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This Is Your Brain On Aspartame

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GreenMedInfo

April 9th 2014

By: Margie King, Health Coach

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Controversy continues to rage over the artificial sweetener aspartame. Since it was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1981, aspartame has made its way into more than 6,000 food items.

The FDA claims aspartame is safe but has set an acceptable daily intake of no more than 50 mg per kilogram of body weight. In other words, an adult weighing 165 pounds should consume no more than 3,750 mg of aspartame a day. A can of diet soda typically contains about 180 mg of the chemical. That means the FDA's "safe" limit equates to about 21 cans of diet soda per day.

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Sugar: Killing Us Sweetly

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GreenMedInfo

February 3rd 2014

By: Gary Null, PhD

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In September 2013, a bombshell report from Credit Suisse's Research Institute brought into sharp focus the staggering health consequences of sugar on the health of Americans. The group revealed that approximately "30%–40% of healthcare expenditures in the USA go to help address issues that are closely tied to the excess consumption of sugar."[1] The figures suggest that our national addiction to sugar runs us an incredible $1 trillion in healthcare costs each year. The Credit Suisse report highlighted several health conditions including coronary heart diseases, type II diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which numerous studies have linked to excessive sugar intake.[2]

Just a year earlier in 2012, a report by Dr. Sanjay Gupta appearing on 60 Minutes featured the work of Dr. Robert Lustig, an endocrinologist from California who gained national attention after a lecture he gave titled "Sugar: The Bitter Truth " went viral in 2009. Lustig's research has investigated the connection between sugar consumption and the poor health of the American people. He has published twelve articles in peer-reviewed journals identifying sugar as a major factor in the epidemic of degenerative disease that now afflicts our country. The data compiled by Lustig clearly show how excessive sugar consumption plays a key role in the development of many types of cancer, obesity, type II diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. His research has led him to conclude that 75% of all diseases in America today are brought on by the American lifestyle and are entirely preventable.[3]

Until the airing of this program, no one in the "official" world acknowledged anything wrong with sugar, here is a sampling of some the latest research available to them if they chose to look:

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National Post
Jane Macdougall
Illustration by Sarah Lazarovic
February 1, 2014


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What got my attention was his remark about celery.

You know: the dieters’ wishful thinking on whether eating celery is a sum negative activity, or not.

He was certainly entitled to speak. His name is Dr. Gerald Krystal and he’s a professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at University of British Columbia, as well as Distinguished Scientist at the Terry Fox Laboratory at the BC Cancer Agency.

We were perched like vultures over a buffet table, commenting on the many ways to die. Fats, salts, sugars, alcohol: pick your delicious poison. I like ’em all.

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GreenMedInfo

November 30th 2013

By: Sayer Ji, Founder

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A new, in-depth review on the synthetic sweetener sucralose (marketed as Splenda), published in the journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, is destined to overturn widely held misconceptions about the purported safety of this ubiquitous artificial sweetener.

Found in tens of thousands of products and used by millions of consumers around the world, sucralose's unique ability to dissolve in alcohol and methanol as well as water, makes it the most versatile and therefore most widely used artificial sweetener in production today. And yet, its popularity is no indication nor guarantee of its safety, as is evidenced by the widespread use of other artificial sweeteners like aspartame, which while being safety approved in 90 nations around the world , has been linked to a wide range of serious health conditions including brain damage.

But the tide may be turning...

Already this year , the Center for the Public Interest in Science downgraded Splenda from "safe" to "caution," citing their need to evaluate a forthcoming Italian study linking the artificial sweetener to leukemia in mice as a basis for their decision.

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Huffington Post

October 18, 2013

Michael F. Jacobson

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If you know a child with ADHD, you know hyperactivity can make it difficult for parents trying to raise happy, healthy children. And you know that the day after Halloween is one of the most disruptive days of the year!

But did you know that many food and candy companies use unnecessary ingredients that can trigger hyperactivity, adding additional stress to families already coping with ADHD?

Petroleum-based artificial food dyes are found in everything from cereal, yogurt, and granola bars to candy, chips, and even children's medicines! Numerous scientific studies have demonstrated that dyes can cause hyperactivity in sensitive children. In fact, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration acknowledges that. But the FDA has refused to ban dyes or even require a warning notice on labels, as the European Union does for most dyes.

Ahead of October 31 this year, the Center for Science in the Public Interest is working with the Shutters family from Jamestown, N.Y. to publicize renewed attention to the link between artificial dyes and hyperactivity in kids, get the word out to families affected by ADHD, and encourage companies to stop coloring foods with these harmful dyes.

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Globe News Wire

August 30, 2013

Source: Weston A. Price Foundation

Deficiencies of vitamins A, D, K, B1, B3, B6, B12 and folate, and of minerals iodine, potassium, iron, magnesium, zinc, chromium and manganese can all contribute to mental instability and violent behavior, according to a report published in the Spring 2013 issue of Wise Traditions, the journal of the Weston A. Price Foundation.

The article, Violent Behavior: A Solution in Plain Sight by Sylvia Onusic, PhD, CNS, LDN, seeks reasons for the increase in violent behavior in America, especially among teenagers.

"We can blame violence on the media and on the breakdown of the home," says Onusic, "but the fact is that a large number of Americans, living mostly on devitalized processed food, are suffering from malnutrition. In many cases, this means their brains are starving."

In fact, doctors are seeing a return of nutritional deficiency diseases such as scurvy and pellagra, which were declared eradicated long ago by public health officials. Many of these conditions cause brain injuries as well.

Symptoms of pellagra, for example, include anxiety, hyperactivity, depression, fatigue, headache, insomnia and hallucinations. Pellagra is a disease caused by deficiency of vitamin B3. Zinc deficiency is linked with angry, aggressive, and hostile behaviors that result in violence. The best dietary sources of zinc are red meat and shellfish.

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Posted by Xeno

June 30, 2013


Aspartame — best known by the names of Nutrasweet and Equal — is believed to be carcinogenic and accounts for more reports of adverse reactions than all other foods and food additives combined.

Yet, this artificial sweetener continues to be used in more than 6,000 products (often sugar-free or “diet” versions), and millions of people consume this toxic chemical daily, believing it to be a healthy alternative to sugar.

If you’re one of them, or know someone who is, watching the 90-minute documentary Sweet Misery, above, could literally save your life. You might find you have something in common with filmmaker and narrator Cori Brackett’s own personal story, which starts out the film.

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GreenMedInfo
June 1st 2013
By: Nancy Elizabeth Shaw

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Nutritional Healing from Cancer: The Fundamentals of an Alkaline Diet

There is something that every cancer patient should hear from their oncologist when they are first diagnosed. They should be told that by making certain dietary changes, they could increase their chances of healing from cancer dramatically, no matter what course of treatment they pursue.

Cancer patients should be informed that nutrition is their first and best defense when starting down the path of healing from cancer. Information should be provided about how to switch to an alkaline diet,[i] composed of primarily vegetables, with a small amount of fruit, grains and protein. This diet is similar to the ketogenic[ii] diet, which is much discussed in the oncology press, but with further reduction in total protein consumption as well as grains, processed fats and sugar, to help control inflammation in the body.

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GreenMedInfo

May 2nd 2013

By: Sayer Ji, Founder

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Promoted for decades as a "safe" sugar alternative, presumably to prevent or reduce symptoms of diabetes, Splenda (sucralose) has been found to have diabetes-promoting effects in human subjects.

The artificial sweetener sucralose, which is approximately 600 times sweeter than sucrose (table sugar), and marketed under a variety of brand names, such as Splenda, Cukren, Nevella and SucraPlus, has recently been found to diabetes-promoting effects in human test subjects, despite containing no calories and being classified as a 'nonutritive sweetener.'

A new study published in the journal Diabetes Care, lead by researchers at the Center for Human Nutrition, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, set out to test the metabolic effects of sucralose in obese subjects who did not use nonnutritive sweeteners.

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PreventDisease

April 11, 2013

by MARCO TORRES

That’s the conclusion of a large cohort study from the Netherlands which compared generational shifts in a range of well established metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Assessing the trends, the investigators concluded that “the more recently born generations are doing worse”, and warn “that the prevalence of metabolic risk factors and the lifelong exposure to them have increased and probably will continue to increase”.

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Life expectancy at birth rose by a few years for both men and women in the last two decades of the 20th century. This has come at an enormous cost in the quality of life of our elders, for they are suffering with more pain and greater disability than ever before in last 15 years of life. People globally are living longer but chronic debilitating conditions are becoming more prevalent.

A recent Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 involved 486 authors in 50 countries who aimed to offer a comprehensive update on diseases and injuries since the last such report in 1990. It found the leading risk factor accounting for the disease burden in most developed nations is diet.

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