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Corporate links of global health foundations may conflict with philanthropic interest


Summary:
Major philanthropic foundations in global health, which often influence and shape the international global health agenda, have links with food and pharmaceutical corporations that could constitute a conflict of interest to the foundations' philanthropic work, reveals a new analysis.
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Taking paracetamol while pregnant 'could harm your daughter's fertility': Study links popular painkiller to smaller ovaries and fewer eggs

  • Female offspring had smaller ovaries and gave birth to fewer babies
  • Prolonged use also causes levels of the hormone testosterone to plummet
  • Medicines appeared to have a similar effect on subsequent generations
  • Experts advise against prolonged use of the painkiller during pregnancy

Pregnant women who take common painkillers like paracetamol could unwittingly be putting the fertility of their daughters at risk, a study suggests.

Paracetamol is the most widely-used painkiller in the world - and is deemed the only painkiller that is safe for mothers-to-be.

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Warning as up to 15 kids COLLAPSE after having 'duff jabs' at school


HORROR unfolded at a secondary school after paramedics were called out to treat up to 15 pupils who collapsed after having their jabs.

Between 10 and 15 Year 10 students keeled over after having their vaccinations at Northampton School for Boys yesterday.

One parent, whose son saw the drama unfold, said children were seen "on their backs on the floor with their legs up on chairs".

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Half of drugs prescribed in France useless or dangerous, say two specialists

The doctors claim that the state wastes money on unnecessary medicine that they blame for up to 20,000 deaths annually

Half of all medicines being prescribed by doctors in France are either useless or potentially dangerous for patients, according to two eminent medical specialists. They blame the powerful pharmaceutical companies for keeping these drugs on sale at huge expense to the health system and the taxpayer.

Professor Philippe Even, director of the prestigious Necker Institute, and Bernard Debré, a doctor and member of parliament, say removing what they describe as superfluous and hazardous drugs from the list of those paid for by the French health service would save up to €10bn (£8bn) a year. It would also prevent up to 20,000 deaths linked to the medication and reduce hospital admissions by up to 100,000, they claim.

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CE Collective Evolution

November 1, 2015

by Arjun Walia.

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It seems as if it was yesterday when the masses were completely unaware of the concerns being raised by a number of internationally recognized scientists regarding Genetically Modified Foods (GM). Now, dozens of countries in Europe have completely banned or have severe restrictions on GMOs, which includes the pesticides that go along with them. In fact, 19 new countries in Europe recently banned the growing of Genetically Modified foods in their countries, citing a number of health and environmental concerns. You can read more about that here.

The Difference Between Organic Food & Conventional Food

According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), organic farms and processors must not use any genetically modified ingredients. This means that organic farmers can’t plant GMO seeds, an organic cow can’t eat GMO feed, an organic soup producer can’t use any GMO ingredients, and so on. Farmers and processors must show that they aren’t using GMOs and that they are protecting their products from contact with prohibited substances from farm to table. In order for something to qualify as organic, it must also be free from most synthetic materials, like pesticides and antibiotics. (source)(source)

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Pharmaceutical industry, under scrutiny for prices, has history of big political wins


Soaring drug prices already had customers unhappy. The pharmaceutical industry hardly needed a new poster boy to add volume and passion to the complaints.

But that’s just what it got last week when Martin Shkreli, the CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, made a name for himself after he hiked the price of a drug for AIDS and cancer patients by more than 4,000 percent. Now, some lawmakers are scrutinizing another company, Valeant Pharmaceuticals, for increasing the price of two heart drugs this year.

Meanwhile, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, vying for the Democratic presidential nomination, have both released plans for lowering prescription drug prices.

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, acutely aware of its image problem – 72 percent of Americans say prescription drug costs are unreasonable, according to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll – promptly distanced itself from Turing (whose CEO has now said he will lower the price of Daraprim, the drug involved in the controversy). And the powerful industry trade group itself is in reboot mode with a new president and CEO, Stephen Ubl.

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The Legal Drug That Kills More People Than Heroin

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The Legal Drug That Kills More People Than Heroin

Since Nixon declared a “war on drugs” during a speech in 1971 drug policy has been dominated by a certain style of aggressive tactics and rhetoric to curb recreational drug-use, arguably driven less by science and statistics and more by economics and emotion. Last year, over $51 billion (£34 billion) was spent towards this cause in the U.S. alone.

This graph from Business Insider, below, shows the rates of overdose deaths in America from 1999 to 2013, giving an insight into how unsuccessful, if not counterintuitive, this initiative has become.

Since 1999, America has seen rising rates of fatal heroin, cocaine and opioid overdoses, with an estimated 300,000 more people addicted to heroin today than a decade ago. This increase in use can largely explain the rise in deaths caused by the drug, which is closely linked to the growth of prescription opioid abuse. While cocaine overdoses have dropped since 2006, they still remain higher in 2013 than they were 14 years previously.

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Germ-Killing Bathroom Sprays Appear to Weaken Fertility


Some products impact sperm production and ovulation in mice


Common ingredients in the cleaning sprays for your kitchen and bathroom make mice less fertile, suggesting the compounds could do the same to humans, according to a new study.

Health researchers are concerned about specific chemicals used in cleaners—including popular brands like Lysol, Clorox and Simple Green—called quaternary ammonium compounds, used to kill microorganisms. Recent laboratory work from Virginia Tech University scientists found that when mice are exposed, both males and females have some unsettling impacts, such as weaker sperm and decreased ovulation.

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Update on Medical Practices That Should Be Questioned in 2015.


Abstract

Importance:

Overuse of medical care, consisting primarily of overdiagnosis and overtreatment, is a common clinical problem.

Objectives:

To identify and highlight articles published in 2014 that are most likely to influence medical overuse, organized into the categories of overdiagnosis, overtreatment, and methods to avoid overuse, and to review these articles and interpret them for their importance to clinical medicine.

Evidence Review:

A structured review of English-language articles in PubMed published in 2014 and a review of tables of contents of relevant journals to identify potential articles that related to medical overuse in adults.

Findings:

We reviewed 910 articles, of which 440 addressed medical overuse. Of these, 104 were deemed most relevant based on the presentation of original data, quality of methods, magnitude of clinical effect, and number of patients potentially affected. The 10 most influential articles were selected by author consensus using the same criteria. Findings included lack of benefit for screening pelvic examinations (positive predictive value <5%), carotid artery screening (no reduction in stroke), and thyroid ultrasonography (15-fold increase in thyroid cancer). The harms of cancer screening included unnecessary surgery and complications. Head computed tomography was an overused diagnostic test (clinically significant findings in 4% [7 of 172] of head computed tomographic scans). Overtreatment included acetaminophen for low back pain, perioperative aspirin use, medications to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, stenting for renal artery stenosis, and prolonged opioid use after surgery (use >90 days in 3% [1229 of 39 140] of patients).

Conclusions and Relevance:

Many common medical practices should be reconsidered. It is anticipated that our review will promote reflection on these 10 articles and lead to questioning of other non-evidence-based practices.

Suore: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26551354

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At top U.S. hospital, almost 50 percent of surgeries have drug-related error

Nearly half of all surgeries at one of the nation's top hospitals involve some kind of medication error or unintended drug side effect, a rate likely to be found at other U.S. hospitals, researchers said.

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found that 124 of the 277 operations they watched in 2013-2014 included at least one medication error or drug-related incident that harmed a patient. Among the most frequently observed errors were mistakes in labeling, incorrect dosages and medications that should have been given but were not.

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