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Chuck Norris connects vaccines, allergies

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Many experts are already pointing to 2014 as clouding up to be one of the worst allergy seasons on record. It will certainly be among the longest, starting weeks earlier than in the past and estimated to extend through October. Fueling this “pollen vortex,” as some reporters are calling it, are higher-than-normal carbon dioxide levels in the air, which trigger more pollen production – maybe as much as five times more pollen than usual. A lack of rainfall to wash it away and increasing drought conditions around the country worsen the situation.
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How Conflicts of Interest Have Corrupted the CDC

by Joseph Mercola, MD

Conflicts of interest have become more the rule than the occasional exception. Even the trusted US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) receives heavy funding from industry.

How this conflict of interest may have affected the organization’s decisions is the topic of an article1 in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), penned by the journal’s associate editor, Jeanne Lenzer, who notes:

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Victims suffering side effects from cervical cancer vaccines that were once recommended by the government announced Wednesday they will file a lawsuit against the state and drugmakers.

“Many victims are still suffering from side effects of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines Cervarix and Gardsil, which include overall pain and disorders of perception, movement and memory,” lawyer Masumi Minaguchi, a representative from the planned lawsuit’s defense team told a news conference in Tokyo.

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A new article in the journal Pediatrics is calling on health professionals to stop saying that breastfeeding is natural, arguing that doing so gives the impression that natural parenting practices are healthier. The authors have started a public campaign to end the positive use of the word natural, claiming that it is associated with such "problematic" practices as home birth, homeschooling and the rejection of GMO foods, and that natural parenting movements are interfering with vaccination efforts.

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Parents who fail to vaccinate their children in Uganda will face six months in jail, according to a new law signed by President Yoweri Museveni.

It also requires children to have an immunisation card to allow them to go to school.

The law will help the government reach its vaccination target, Health Minister Sarah Achieng Opendi told the BBC.

Some parents and members of a religious cult have refused to allow their children vaccinated, she says.

The government's vaccination campaign targets several life-threatening diseases including polio and meningitis.

In 2015, the World Health Organization estimated that 70 children out of every 1,000 will die before they reached the age of five in Uganda.

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WHO Backs Trials of Bacteria, Genetic Modification to Fight Zika Mosquitoes

Methods will be used in combination with other traditional tools

By Kate Kelland

LONDON (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) called on Friday for pilot projects to test two experimental ways to curb Zika-carrying mosquitoes, including testing the release of genetically modified insects and bacteria that stop their eggs hatching.

Zika virus, which is sweeping through the Americas, is transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which the U.N. health body has described as an "opportunistic and tenacious menace".

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Pharmaceutical industry: A dose of reality

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Pharmaceutical industry: A dose of reality


FOR years, African countries have paid exorbitant amounts for pharmaceuticals developed in the US, including drugs such as AZT, which is used to treat Aids.

The reasoning was always that it cost pharmaceutical companies upwards of US$1bn to create these drugs — and these costs must be recouped.

But a new investigation of the murky tax breaks used by the industry tell another story entirely.

Take the case of Puerto Rico, a small island in the Caribbean which is officially a US territory. It may seem unlikely, but in the late 1990s and early 2000s, Puerto Rico became a destination for drug companies seeking to make use of its status as a tax haven. There, one of the small coastal towns, called Barceloneta, was even dubbed “Ciudad Viagra”, as it churned out 100m of Pfizer’s little blue pills.

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A Sydney law firm has launched a class action on behalf of people who as children and adolescents were prescribed the anti-depressant drug Paroxetine.

Drayton Sher Lawyers has called for expressions of interest from people who were prescribed the drug, commonly known as Aropax in Australia, when they were 18 or younger.

Solicitor Tony Nikolic​ said hundreds of people had indicated they would join the class action, which he expects to file in the Federal Court at the end of May.


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50% hike in antidepressant use in UK children

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50% hike in antidepressant use in UK children

Prescriptions for antidepressants in children rose 54% between 2005 and 2012 in the UK, an international study has revealed.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) said it was ‘very concerned’ by the rise in use of the drugs in children both in the UK and other countries which it said was ‘not justified’.

Similar increases of 60% in Denmark and 49% in Germany were recorded over the same period, while antidepressant use in children went up by 26% in the USA and 17% in The Netherlands.

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A rise in the use of anti-depressant drugs among children is a concern, the World Health Organization has said.

A warning in 2004 brought a fall in use of the drugs, after fears that some could lead to suicidal behaviour.

But a new study shows that between 2005 and 2012 there was a 54% increase in the number of young people prescribed them in the UK.

It also showed rises in Denmark (60%), Germany (49%), the US (26%) and the Netherlands (17%) in the same period.

'Matter of concern'

World Health Organization (WHO) director of mental health Dr Shekhar Saxena said the research, published in the European Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, raises serious questions.

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