Recently in Psychiatry Category

FDA colludes with Big Pharma to cover up deaths in psych drug trials

(NaturalNews) Does the habitual use of antidepressants do more harm than good to many patients? Absolutely, says one expert in a new British Medical Journal report. Moreover, he says that the federal Food and Drug Administration might even be hiding the truth about antidepressant lethality.

In his portion of the report, Peter C. Gotzsche, a professor at the Nordic Cochrane Centre in Denmark, said that nearly all psychotropic drug use could be ended today without deleterious effects, adding that such "drugs are responsible for the deaths of more than half a million people aged 65 and older each year in the Western world."

Gotzsche, author of the 2013 book Deadly Medicines and Organized Crime: How Big Pharma Has Corrupted Healthcare, further notes in the BMJ that "randomized trials that have been conducted do not properly evaluate the drugs' effects." He adds, "Almost all of them are biased because they included patients already taking another psychiatric drug."

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Psychiatric drugs lead to the deaths of over 500,000 people aged 65 and over annually in the West, a Danish scientist says. He warns the benefits of these drugs are “minimal,” and have been vastly overstated.

Research director at Denmark’s Nordic Cochrane Centre, Professor Peter Gøtzsche, says the use of most antidepressants and dementia drugs could be halted without inflicting harm on patients. The Danish scientist’s views were published in the British Medical Journal on Tuesday.

His scathing analysis will likely prove controversial among traditional medics. However, concern is mounting among doctors and scientists worldwide that psychiatric medication is doing more harm than good. In particular, they say antipsychotic drugs have been overprescribed to many dementia patients in a bid to calm agitated behavior.

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You never thought you would find yourself living in a society where 2 or 3 year-olds were legally high on amphetamines every day, did you?

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Iheartintelligence

February 1, 2015

By : Eevee G

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Alcoholism is one of the most dangerous and common addictions of our time. The World Health Organization’s statistics show that over 140 million people worldwide are suffering from it. Alcoholism-related illnesses are the cause of death of more than 80,000 people a year in the US and of over 3 million people in the world. This makes it one of the first preventable causes of death (nearly 6% of all deaths are related to alcoholism).

With so many people having to deal with the problems of such kind of addiction, different studies have been held in order a reliable treatment to be found. One of the most recent studies, conducted at the University of New Mexico, found that using psilocybin can be an excellent way to treat alcoholism. Some of the people who were a part of the research team were Dr. Michael Bogenschutz and Dr. Rick Strassman- the author of “DMT: The Spirit Molecule” who has previously done research on DMT in the 1990s.

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CCHR International

The Mental Health Watchdog

January 7, 2015

“All classes of psychiatric drugs can cause brain damage and lasting mental dysfunction when used for months or years” — Dr. Peter Breggin

American Free Press, January 6, 2014

by Peter Breggin, Psychiatrist

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"All classes of psychiatric drugs cause serious and dangerous withdrawal reactions, and again, it is prudent and safest to assume that any psychiatric drug can cause withdrawal problems. Meanwhile, there is no substantial or convincing evidence that any psychiatric drug is useful longer-term. Psychiatric drug treatment for months or years lacks scientific basis. Therefore, the risk-benefit ratio is enormously lopsided toward the risk."

Psychiatric drugs are more dangerous than you have ever imagined. If you haven’t been prescribed one yet, you are among the lucky few. If you or a loved one are taking psychiatric drugs, there is hope, but you need to understand the dangers and how to minimize the risk.

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Jon Rappoport's Blog

www.nomorefakenews.com

June12, 2014

by Jon Rappoport

I’ve published much information revealing psychiatry is a scientific fraud. Now, courtesy of Dr. Fred Baughman (ADHDfraud.net), I have two more smoking guns.

The first is a letter, dated November 10, 2008, sent from Supriya Sharma, MD, a director general of Health Canada, to a private citizen (name withheld).

Health Canada is the equivalent of the FDA in America.

Dr. Sharma is “responding on the Minister’s behalf”—the Health Minister of Canada, a post roughly comparable to the US Secretary of Health and Human Services.

Here is Dr. Sharma’s key passage:

“For mental/psychiatric disorders in general, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and ADHD, there are no confirmatory gross, microscopic or chemical abnormalities that have been validated for objective physical diagnosis.”

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CCHR international

By Kelly Patricia O’Meara

June 9, 2013

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“Mental health, psychiatric drugs and violence are the common denominator among the growing list of killers. How many more have to die before the mental health industry is held responsible, and accountable, for this deadly 'treatment?'”

In the last forty-five days there have been three violent killing sprees committed by young men whose only common denominator is a history of mental health services and psychiatric drug use. Given that this is becoming the norm, rather than the exception, one can only wonder how long the mental health community can get away with feigning no responsibility for these ever-increasing senseless acts of violence?

The alleged Seattle Pacific University killer, Aaron Ybarra, is the most recent example of perpetrators with mental health histories and prescribed mind-altering psychiatric drugs as “treatment.” Ybarra’s history includes multiple encounters with the mental health industry and, according to Ybarra himself, he had been taking the antidepressant Prozac and an anti-psychotic Risperdal, to help him with his problems.

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The New York Times

By ALAN SCHWARZMAY

May 16, 2014

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Susanna N. Visser presented a report on Friday at the Georgia Mental Health Forum in
Atlanta on the diagnosis and medication for A.D.H.D. in young children.
Credit Dustin Chambers for The New York Times

ATLANTA — More than 10,000 American toddlers 2 or 3 years old are being medicated for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder outside established pediatric guidelines, according to data presented on Friday by an official at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report, which found that toddlers covered by Medicaid are particularly prone to be put on medication such as Ritalin and Adderall, is among the first efforts to gauge the diagnosis of A.D.H.D. in children below age 4. Doctors at the Georgia Mental Health Forum at the Carter Center in Atlanta, where the data was presented, as well as several outside experts strongly criticized the use of medication in so many children that young.

The American Academy of Pediatrics standard practice guidelines for A.D.H.D. do not even address the diagnosis in children 3 and younger — let alone the use of such stimulant medications, because their safety and effectiveness have barely been explored in that age group. “It’s absolutely shocking, and it shouldn’t be happening,” said Anita Zervigon-Hakes, a children’s mental health consultant to the Carter Center. “People are just feeling around in the dark. We obviously don’t have our act together for little children.”

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PreventDisease.com

April 30, 2012

It's a sign of the times where the medicalization of almost every human behavior is being documented, labeled and categorized as some type of illness or 'disorder.' A psychiatrist who heads the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) wants to broaden the definition of children with mental illness so that unruly and badly behaved kids will soon be diagnosed as having mental disorders.

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It's not terribly shocking anymore to have some so-called expert, academic or psychiatrist label perfectly normal human behaviors as disorders. What a coincidence that this one happens to head the NIMH.

"One reason we haven't made greater progress helping people recover from mental disorders is that we get on the scene too late," said Thomas R. Insel, MD, director of the NIMH and the featured speaker at the American Academy of Pediatrics' Presidential Plenary during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Boston.

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GreenMedInfo

January 30th 2014

By: Sayer Ji, Founder

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As far back as 1954, reports of the full or partial resolution of schizophrenia following a gluten free diet began to surface in the medical literature. We covered this remarkable pattern of associations in a previous article titled, "60 Years of Research Links Gluten Grains to Schizophrenia ." While the explanation for this intriguing connection has remained focused on the disruption of the gut-brain axis and the presence in wheat of a wide range of pharmacologically active and mostly opioid receptor modulating polypeptides, a new and possibly more disturbing explanation is beginning to surface: wheat consumption cuts off blood flow to the brain.

Starting with a 1997 case study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine involving a 33-year-old patient, with pre-existing diagnosis of 'schizophrenic' disorder, who first came to medical attention for severe diarrhea and weight loss (classical symptoms of gluten intolerance), brain scan technology determined that cerebral hypoperfusion (decreased blood flow to the brain) was occurring within the patient's frontal cortex.[i] A gluten free diet resulted not only in the normalization of intestinal damage and autoantibodies, but the return of blood flow to the frontal cortex, and the resolution of schizophrenic symptoms.

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