Recently in Psychiatry Category

Antidepressants can raise the risk of suicide, biggest ever review finds

Antidepressant use doubles the risk of suicide in under 18s and the risks to adults may have been seriously underestimated, researchers found   


(Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment: systematic review and meta-analyses based on clinical study reports

http://www.bmj.com/content/352/bmj.i65 )

Antidepressants can raise the risk of suicide, the biggest ever review has found, as pharmaceutical companies were accused of failing to report side-effects and even deaths linked to the drugs.

An analysis of 70 trials of the most common antidepressants - involving more than 18,000 people - found they doubled the risk of suicide and aggressive behaviour in under 18s.

Although a similarly stark link was not seen in adults, the authors said misreporting of trial data could have led to a ‘serious under-estimation of the harms.’

"It is absolutely horrendous that they have such disregard for human lives."

Professor Peter Gotzsche, Nordic Cochrane Centre


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Maternal Antidepressant Use Tied to Autism

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Maternal Antidepressant Use Tied to Autism


In a major study, published yesterday in JAMA Pediatrics, the use of SSRI antidepressants during pregnancy was found to increase the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by 87-percent. Previous studies reveal that more than 13-percent of women currently use SSRI antidepressants during pregnancy.
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Research raises questions over ADHD drug effects

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Research raises questions over ADHD drug effects

Researchers voiced concern on Wednesday about poor quality studies on the popular ADHD treatment Ritalin, saying evidence of some benefits, but also of sleep problems and appetite loss, suggests the drug should be prescribed with caution.

Ritalin is sold by Swiss pharmaceutical firm Novartis NOVN.VX, known generically as methylphenidate and also sold under the brand names Concerta, Medikinet and Equasym. It has been used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)for more than 50 years.

The Cochrane Review researchers, who conducted a full assessment of studies on the benefits and harms of the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) drug, said evidence on its use in children was poor.

"Our expectations of this treatment are probably greater than they should be," said Morris Zwi, a London-based consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist, who worked on the review.


Read more at Reutershttp://www.reuters.com/article/2015/11/25/us-health-adhd-ritalin-idUSKBN0TE01320151125#LigkTRWhgBfFUpBU.99
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Researchers Urge Caution In Prescribing ADHD Drug: Ritalin May Not Treat Symptoms


A team of health experts warned via a new Cochrane Review that physicians should take caution in prescribing the drug methylphenidate, commonly known for its brand name Ritalin, to patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder because despite the drug's health benefits, it may also cause harmful side-effects.

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Many Antidepressant Studies Found Tainted by Pharma Company Influence

A review of studies that assess clinical antidepressants shows hidden conflicts of interest and financial ties to corporate drugmakers

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Does your child really need Ritalin?

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Does your child really need Ritalin?

Prescriptions for Ritalin have doubled in the the last decade for children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder but is this chemical cosh an easy option when it should be the drug of last resort


Ben Napier wasn’t your typical ADHD child, more of a daydreamer than a misbehaver, remembers his mother, Pauline. 'He’d forget to hand in his homework, even though it was in his bag and have trouble understanding instructions or copying anything down off the board,’ she says. 'He was struggling at school and I knew something was wrong.’ When Ben was 12, his teacher recommended Pauline take him to see a doctor.

After a two-year process of assessment, Ben was finally diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Though Ben was relieved, 'I know I’m not stupid now,’ his mother was heartbroken. 'I felt powerless,’ says Pauline. By way of help, the only option offered to Ben was the medication methylphenidate, otherwise known as Ritalin, which works by stimulating a part of the brain that modifies mental and behavioural reactions. 'There was no offer of behavioural or parenting support, nothing,’ says Pauline. 'I felt it was my only option. It’s a terrible decision to have to make; to medicate your child.’

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Thousands of children are being medicated for ADHD – when the condition may not even exist


Most epidemics are the result of a contagious disease. ADHD – Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder – is not contagious, and it may not even be a genuine malady, but it has acquired the characteristics of an epidemic. New data has revealed that UK prescriptions for Ritalin and other similar ADHD medications have more than doubled in the last decade, from 359,100 in 2004 to 922,200 last year. In America, the disorder is now the second most frequent long-term diagnosis made in children, narrowly trailing asthma. It generates pharmaceutical sales worth $9bn (£5.7bn) per year. Yet clinical proof of ADHD as a genuine illness has never been found.

Sami Timimi, consultant child psychiatrist at Lincolnshire NHS Trust and visiting professor of child psychiatry, is a vocal critic of the Ritalin-friendly orthodoxy within the NHS. While he is at pains to stress that he is “not saying those who have the diagnosis don’t have any problem”, he is adamant that “there is no robust evidence to demonstrate that what we call ADHD correlates with any known biological or neurological abnormality”.

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CCHR International

June 18, 2015

There is overwhelming evidence that psychiatric drugs cause violence. 22 International drug regulatory warnings cite violence, mania, hostility, aggression, psychosis and even homicidal ideation. Individuals under the influence of such drugs and committing these acts of senseless violence are not limited to using guns are not limited to just schools. Recent examples of individuals under the influence of such drugs including Navy Yard shooter Aaron Alexis and Fort Hood shooter Ivan Lopez.

Fact: Despite 22 international drug regulatory warnings on psychiatric drugs citing effects of mania, hostility, violence and even homicidal ideation, and dozens of high profile shootings/killings tied to psychiatric drug use, there has yet to be a federal investigation on the link between psychiatric drugs and acts of senseless violence.

Fact: At least 35 school shootings and/or school-related acts of violence have been committed by those taking or withdrawing from psychiatric drugs resulting in 169 wounded and 79 killed (in other school shootings, information about their drug use was never made public—neither confirming or refuting if they were under the influence of prescribed drugs).

Fact: Between 2004 and 2012, there have been 14,773 reports to the U.S. FDA’s MedWatch system on psychiatric drugs causing violent side effects including: 1,531 cases of homicidal ideation/homicide, 3,287 cases of mania & 8,219 cases of aggression. Note: The FDA estimates that less than 1% of all serious events are ever reported to it, so the actual number of side effects occurring are most certainly higher.

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nomorefakenews

The Real News

by Jon Rappoport

June 18 , 2015

"Long-term covert ops sometimes disguise themselves by claiming that the hidden cause of a problem is the cure. So it is with psychiatric drugs, like SSRI antidepressants, which push people into committing murder. In the aftermath of these killings, leaders call for expanded psychiatric screening---which will result in further prescription of those very same drugs." (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

Police report the suspect in the Charleston church shooting, Dylann Roof, has been captured.

This is the latest in a string of crimes in which black-white conflict has been highlighted, pressed, argued, and used, for the purposes of: fanning flames of racial discord, exercising further gun control, and fatuously claiming that universal psychiatric screening and drugging is an answer.

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Pfizer Report Warns of Possible Zoloft and Birth Defect Link

A Pfizer Inc. report shows a scientist warned executives last year about a potential link between the anti-depressant drug Zoloft and birth defects and recommended changes to the medication’s safety warning.

The document from a Pfizer drug-safety official might complicate the company’s efforts to fend off lawsuits brought by parents of children with malformed hearts. Pfizer has consistently rejected suggestions Zoloft caused newborn abnormalities and said Monday the document was taken out of context by lawyers suing the company.

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