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APA Should End Electroshock for Unruly Kids - Resolution

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In January this year we reported about an institution that has been administering electric shock to kids that are unruly or otherwise difficult to control - the Massachusetts-based organization called the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center. At the time, although a court said the violent treatments in use in the institution should be phased out, the judge was in no hurry to enforce that decision, in effect allowing 30 months time. In June 2009, according to the court, new students should no longer be getting electric shocks but for those already so treated, the torturous regime could be continued.

MotherJones magazine published an article - School of Shock - asking "How many times do you have to zap a child before it's torture?"

Opponents of the shock treatment administered to children as a part of their 'education' want the torture to end immediately. If you agree, you can add your voice. It is rather simple.

Vince Boehm says:

The JRC pursues a course of aversive therapy that uses electrodes attached to a child's body, giving "bee sting" jolts of electricity for such infractions as mouthing off, slouching, nagging, swearing and failure to maintain a neat appearance. They use other forms of aversion therapy as well.

Some of you may know this. The use of electric shocks in an attempt to modify behavior in a certain class of sex crime has been tried for at least 30 years with nil success. Where challenged (10 states), this method has been largely been disallowed as "cruel and unusual punishment". To do this sort of thing to a child who may have the mental age of 3 or 4 (as cited in a court document I read about this place) is beyond human comprehension.

I am asking you to sign on to this open letter to the American Psychological Association to act in accordance with its 'Resolution Against Ture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, and Degrading Treatment or Punishment' and take a stand against The Judge Rotenberg Educational Center. This place must be shut down.

To sign on to this appeal, please send an e-mail to Nancy Weiss or Derrick Jeffries.

- - -

Here is the appeal from Nancy Weiss

Ms. Weiss writes:

Please see the attached letter written by Derrick Jeffries and me. You are invited to sign-on individually or on behalf of your organization.

The letter calls upon the American Psychological Association to stand behind its 'Resolution Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, and Degrading Treatment or Punishment' and take a stand against The Judge Rotenberg Educational Center (formerly BRI) in Massachusetts which has a long history of using electric shock, food deprivation and prolonged mechanical restraint, as well as other painful and dehumanizing aversive techniques to change the behavior of people who have autism, developmental disabilities, and psychiatric diagnoses. The APA's recently released '2007 Reaffirmation of the 2006 Resolution' states that the resolution is "a comprehensive and foundational position applicable to all individuals, in all settings and in all contexts without exception." In addition, APA code calls upon members to report apparent ethical violations that have "substantially harmed or are likely to substantially harm a person or organization."

The letter, which has already been endorsed by over 80 individuals and organizations, calls upon the APA to apply their own code of ethics, and to formally and specifically declare their position regarding the use of skin-shock "treatment", food deprivation, and any other aversive procedures that inflict pain or deprive basic human rights at JRC or elsewhere. The letter also requests that the APA send this letter to its members, post it on their website and/or publish it in a newsletter or other publication that reaches its full membership. Derrick sent this letter to the APA in mid-October and sends them weekly updates with additional signatures.

Derrick writes the following, "As a person with Asperger's Syndrome, and a parent of a child with Autism, and a brother of a sister with Autism, I am asking you to join Nancy Weiss and I, and many others, by participating in this effort. Would you please allow us to include your name, and/or organization name on this document as being one of many individuals and organizations presenting this letter to the American Psychological Association? If the APA will take a decisive stance against torture, it may pave the way to ending such practices that take place at the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center."

If you are interested in signing on, please reply or send an e-mail to Derrick Jeffries at: derrick_jeffries@bestmail.us. Let us know if you are signing on as an individual or on behalf of your organization -- it is not necessary to be a disability advocate to sign on -- just a person concerned about the humane treatment of vulnerable people.

Feel free to forward this to lists or individuals who may have interest .


Thanks -

-- Nancy

Nancy R. Weiss
The National Leadership Consortium on Developmental Disabilities
Center for Disabilities Studies
University of Delaware

461 Wyoming Road
Newark, DE 19716
home office: 410-323-6646
www.nlcdd.org


A Call for Ethical and Unprejudiced Leadership and Practice in the Field of Psychology

An Autism & Mental Health Community Letter

October 10, 2007

This letter is to the American Psychological Association (hereafter referred to as APA), and to all professionals in the field of psychology. This letter calls upon APA and professionals who adhere to the APA Code of Ethics to act in a manner that is ethical and consistent with that Code of Ethics. Two recent APA documents are relevant to this call to action. They are, the 2006 "Resolution Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, and Degrading Treatment or punishment" (hereafter referred to as 2006 Resolution), and the 2007 "Reaffirmation of the American Psychological Association Position Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Punishment and Its Application to Individuals Defined in the United States Code as "Enemy Combatants"" (hereafter referred to as 2007 Resolution). With fervor, we are advocating for people with autism, developmental differences, and mental health challenges; urgently entreating that they may be given the same respect with regard to human rights as alleged "Enemy Combatants," or any other human beings. As professionals who adhere to the APA Code of Ethics, nothing less than an unprejudiced stance in this matter should be considered acceptable.

Currently, children and young adults with autism, developmental differences, and mental health challenges are being treated in a manner that clearly meets the definition of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, and Degrading Treatment or Punishment, as defined by the two previously
mentioned APA documents. The Judge Rotenberg Educational Center (hereafter referred to as JRC) in Massachusetts has a long history of using electric shock, food deprivation and prolonged mechanical restraint, as well as other painful and dehumanizing aversive techniques.

The use of the phrase "effective treatment," does not make such techniques humane or acceptable. Furthermore, attempting to justify them as "treatments" of "last resort" may not be completely accurate. It has been clearly demonstrated that positive behavioral approaches, based on a careful analysis of the functions dangerous or disruptive behaviors may be serving are as effective and more enduring than behavior change techniques based on pain and fear.

JRC uses a device that they call the Graduated Electronic Decelerator (GED), to deliver painful electric shocks. Reporters, legislators and others who have experienced the 2-second shock from this device describe it as incredibly painful. A report from the New York State Educational Department noted that JRC was not only using electric shock for dangerous and self-injurious behaviors but also for behaviors that are benign or idiosyncratic such as "nagging, swearing and failure to maintain a neat appearance," or "slouching in a chair."

The director of the Judge Rotenberg Center testified at a legislative hearing that one student received 5,300 electric shocks in one day. In his testimony, he stated that over a 24-hour period, this student, a teenager who weighed only 52 pounds, was subjected to an average of one shock every 16 seconds. During some periods, the student was automatically shocked every second if he lifted his hand off a paddle. A copy of the New York State Report can be found here: http://boston.com/news/daily/15/school_report.pdf and a myriad of additional information on the school and its practices can be found by googling the Judge Rotenberg Center.

Proponents of behaviorism have voiced their opposition to these practices.

Although the Director of the Judge Rotenberg Center often defends his practices by stating that he was trained by B. F. Skinner, Dr. Skinner made it very clear that he did not condone such practices. At the age of 83, he was interviewed by Daniel Goleman of the New York Times. In an article published August 25th, 1987, titled, "Embattled Giant Of Psychology Speaks His Mind," his view is stated. “The use of punishment is another issue Dr. Skinner still feels impassioned about. He is an ardent opponent of the use of punishment, such as spanking, or using ''aversives'' -such as pinches and shocks - with autistic children. ''What's wrong with punishments is that they work immediately, but give no long-term results,'' Dr. Skinner said. ''The responses to punishment are either the urge to escape, to counterattack or a stubborn apathy. These are the bad effects you get in prisons or schools, or wherever punishments are used.''

The 1965 experimental research of O. Ivar Lovaas, Benson Schaeffer, and James Q. Simmons, conducted at the University of California, Los Angeles, concluded that electric shock applications did not have enduring effectiveness. In conclusion, they questioned the need for shocking children with Autism by stating, “A basic question, then, is whether it is necessary to employ shock in accomplishing such an end or whether less drastic methods might suffice.” (Journal Of Experimental Research in Personality 1, 99-109 (1965))

A recent Mother Jones article about this institution began like this, “Rob Santana awoke terrified. He'd had that dream again, the one where silver wires ran under his shirt and into his pants, connecting to electrodes attached to his limbs and torso. Adults armed with surveillance cameras and remote-control activators watched his every move. One press of a button, and there was no telling where the shock would hit—his arm or leg or, worse, his stomach. All Rob knew was that the pain would be intense.” (Mother Jones, August 20, 2007). A horror from the Abu Ghraib prison scandal? No, torture carried out in the name of treatment, right here in the State of Massachusetts, against the most vulnerable of our young people -- and designed and implemented by Psychologists.

It is additionally noted that programs that are built around scientific knowledge and principles will generally welcome peer review and a continual improvement process. Currently and historically, JRC practices are remarkably deficient in these areas. As leaders in the field of psychology, and as professionals who are intolerant of torture, APA has an opportunity, if not an obligation, to demonstrate leadership in this matter. Please consider the following facts and arguments.

Section 1 of the American Psychological Association Code of Ethics, creates a standard of excellence in regards to the personal accountability of psychologists to their Code of Ethics. It also establishes a means for resolving professional ethical issues between psychologists and with organizations with which Psychologists may be affiliated.

Sub-Section 1.05 of the Code of Ethics covers the topic of Reporting Ethical Violations. This sub-section related to reporting, places a grave responsibility upon APA members to report apparent ethical violations that have "substantially harmed or are likely to substantially harm a
person or organization." This reporting "may include referral to state or national committees on professional ethics, to state licensing boards, or to the appropriate institutional authorities."

Within the 2007 Reaffirmation, reference is made to the 2006 Resolution, stating emphatically that it is "a comprehensive and foundational position applicable to all individuals, in all settings and in all contexts without exception." We are in agreement with this position.

We are pleading with APA psychologists, and all psychologists who independently and voluntarily follow the APA Code of Ethics, to consider that the 2006 Resolution is inclusive of all human beings. We ask that it be applied toward those who are receiving treatment/services related to symptoms associated with autism, developmental differences, and mental health challenges, including such that may cause or contribute to self-injurious behavior. This letter is an earnest appeal to APA leadership and all professionals in the field of psychology to demonstrate ethical practices and adhere to the principles of the 2006 Resolution and the 2007 Reaffirmation in opposing the use of skin-shock and food deprivation that are currently being administered as "treatment" for self-injurious behavior, aggressive behavior, and other behaviors that are being considered as precursors. Skin-shock or food deprivation under any other context, or being administered to any other population segment would be considered an inhumane form of punishment that in reality is truly torture. According to the 2006 Resolution, there can be no exception for this type of degrading treatment.

Although there are some children and young adults who are able to communicate how they have been "substantially harmed by a person or organization," there are many others who are unable to do so. Even those young people with the ability to communicate how they are being harmed are virtually unheard. Regardless of the individual’s ability to communicate and describe torture and its physical, mental and emotional effect upon them, this type of "treatment," is still inherently wrong. Is it not the responsibility of a professional or any human being to take action when they are personally aware of acts that are inhumane and degrading forms of torture?

At the JRC this "treatment" is being authorized under court order. While Judges may have extensive expertise within the framework of law, they are reliant upon the testimony of experts (in these cases, Psychologists) to assist them in making decisions. Experts within the field of psychology need to see an example of leadership from organizations such as APA. Good leadership provides guidance and constraints in all areas that are conducive to professionalism and best practices.

In conclusion, we are respectfully appealing to APA members and leadership on the basis of professionalism and unprejudiced application of your own code of ethics, and consistent with your 2006 Resolution and 2007 Reaffirmation, to formally and specifically declare your position
regarding the use of skin-shock "treatments," food deprivation, and any other aversives that inflict pain or deprive basic human rights at JRC or elsewhere. We are calling upon APA members to apply the Code which condemns the treatment that is currently taking place at JRC.

We respectfully request that the APA send this letter to its members, post it on their website and/or publish it in a newsletter or other publication that reaches its full membership. We request that the APA as a professional organization, and as professional individuals actively and vociferously advocate for best practices while opposing that which is torture. We furthermore request that the APA, as an organization, make a formal and specific declaration of its stance in this matter and exercise appropriate discipline, thereby demonstrating that the Code of Ethics will be applied without prejudice. Your example in this will be a voice of hope for those who have been locked away, subjected to daily torture and unseen and unheard for too long.

Written and Presented by:
Derrick Jeffries
Person with Asperger’s Syndrome

Nancy Weiss
Co-Director, The National Leadership Consortium on Developmental Disabilities, Center for
Disabilities Studies, University of Delaware



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