CCHR Human Rights Awardee:Maryanne Godboldo

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Detroit mother Maryanne Godboldo receiving a Human Rights Award from actors Danny Masterson and Ethan Suplee at the CCHR International annual human rights awards banquet in Los Angeles. Former Human Rights awardees include members of Congress, state legislators, psychologists, medical doctors, attorneys, whistleblowers, civil and human rights activists.


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Huffington Post
By Catherine Lagrange and Marion Douet
LYON/PARIS, Februrary 13, 2012

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* Case against Monsanto 1st such claim to reach French court

* Monsanto lawyer says "disappointed", envisages appeal

* Pesticide makers see no evidence of major health risk

(Reuters) - A French court on Monday declared U.S. biotech giant Monsanto guilty of chemical poisoning of a French farmer, a judgment that could lend weight to other health claims against pesticides.

In the first such case heard in court in France, grain grower Paul Francois, 47, says he suffered neurological problems including memory loss, headaches and stammering after inhaling Monsanto's Lasso weedkiller in 2004.

He blames the agri-business giant for not providing adequate warnings on the product label.

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Irish Times
CARL O'BRIEN
Februrary 13, 2012

THE SWINE flu vaccine has topped the list of drugs responsible for the largest number of suspected adverse reactions, new figures show.

A total of 779 suspected adverse reactions were linked to the vaccine between 2010 and 2011.

Most of these were relatively mild, such as localised swelling, gastrointestinal problems and flu-like symptoms.

However, health authorities have identified up to 30 cases of young people with the sleeping disorder narcolepsy as part of an investigation into a possible link between the condition and the swine flu vaccine, Pandemrix.

Health authorities insist the vaccine is safe and that the risk-benefit balance for the jab remains positive.

The Irish Medicines Board said the high reporting rate linked with the pandemic vaccine reflected “both the extent of usage and repeated requests and reminders by the IMB and Health Service Executive for reporting of experience with their use”.

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Foodmatters
Written by Sally Fallon


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We have always processed our food; this is an activity that is uniquely human. We chop, soak, cook and ferment our food - as well as grind and dry - these are all types of processing.

Traditional processing has two functions: to make food more digestible and to preserve it for use during times when food isn’t readily available. Nutritious, long-lasing processed foods including pemmican, hard sausage and old-fashioned meat puddings and haggis, as well as grain products, dairy products, pickles—everything from wine and spirits to lacto-fermented condiments. Farmers and artisans—bread makers, cheese makers, distillers, millers and so forth—processed the raw ingredients into delicious foods that retained their nutritional content over many months or even years, and kept the profits on the farm and in the farming communities where they belonged.

Unfortunately, in modern times, we have substituted local artisanal processing with factory and industrial processing, which actually diminishes the quality of the food, rather than making it more nutritious and digestible. Industrial processing depends upon sugar, white flour, processed and hydrogenated oils, synthetic food additives and vitamins, heat treatment and the extrusion of grains.

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GMOs in Europe - The Anglerfish deception...

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Consumers in Europe have been vocal in rejecting genetically modified foods. This opposition has led to member states adopting similar positions, in defiance of the EU Commission, which sees genetic modification as a triumph of industry and a potential way of increasing crop yields and agricultural profits.

The situation has now become so serious that the EU Commission is looking for ways to change the laws that govern the acceptance of such technologies, recognizing that a common EU stance on genetic modification is becoming an ever more distant dream. It proposed to let countries decide for themselves whether to accept genetic modification on their territory, but there is a hidden intent behind the proposed changes. No longer should, according to the EU bureaucrats, the member states have the possibility to challenge a decision regarding GMOs on scientific grounds. The reason: The European Food Safety Authority is the highest and indeed the unchallengeable authority on such scientific matters.

That is of course the same EU scientific body that treats vital nutrients (vitamins and minerals) as if they were a threat to human health, in need of "toxicological" assessment, while considering toxic fluoride to be a nutrient to be sold alongside vitamins and minerals in food supplements.

Fern Wickson of the GenØk Centre for Biosafety in Norway and Brian Wynne of the Centre for Economic and Social Aspects of Genomics in the Uk say the EU efforts at GMO policy reform are deceptive and have coined an apt term - the anglerfish deception - for them.

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Anglerfish are predators that live in the eternal darkness of the deep oceans and have a distinctive way of catching their prey. They use a long light-emitting filament that extends from their head to lure organisms in the darkness. Those attracted to the shimmering light and movement are then unwittingly caught in front of the anglerfish's wide-open jaws.

Such is the nature of the European Commission (EC)'s proposal for a new European Union (EU) policy on the regulation of genetically mod- ified organisms (GMOs)--it looks alluring at first glance, but there are hidden dangers lurking in the background.

Read more about this...

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AlterNet
By Anna Lekas Miller
February 6, 2012

Occupy comes out to support a lawsuit that hopes to turn the tables on corporate farming behemoth Monsanto.


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Monsanto, if you will, is the 1 percent of Big Agriculture--the scourge of small farmers everywhere. But now those farmers are fighting back, backed by activists from Occupy Wall Street.

First, some history. In 1982, Monsanto scientists were the first to genetically modify a plant cell. Three years later, the US Patent Office ruled that plants were a patentable subject matter.

By 1985, Monsanto had already become a corporate giant by creating RoundUp, the most popular herbicide in the world. Now that it had the legal protection of seed patents in addition to the biotechnology to genetically manipulate its seeds, Monsanto scientists engineered a specific brand of Monsanto seeds that were RoundUp-resistant—unlike organic, natural seeds, these seeds are sterile and have to be re-planted each year, ensuring that customers return year after year to replenish their supply.

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Daily Mail

8th February 8, 2012


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Girls as young as 13 are being given contraceptive implants at school without their parents’ knowledge.

Nurses insert devices into their arms which temporarily prevent pregnancy by releasing hormones into the blood.

Last year 1,700 girls aged 13 and 14 were fitted with implants, while 800 had injections which have the same effect.

The 2010/11 NHS figures also show that 3,200 15-year-old girls were fitted with implants, and 1,700 had injections.

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AlterNet
January 27, 2012
By Kristen Gwynne

Myths about marijuana convince people that alcohol is safer, but science shows pot is the healthier choice.

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Alcohol kills approximately 70,000 people per year. Prescription pills, which have helped overdose become the leading cause of accidental death in America, result in more than 20,000 deaths per year. Marijuana has never killed anybody.

Although scientific research is available to show that pot is relatively harmless, and in fact medically beneficial, myths and propaganda about the plant’s alleged harm lead to marijuana laws so severe they often have the unintended consequence of driving people to drink alcohol, a much more dangerous substance than pot.

Many people do not understand just how harsh some marijuana legislation is. In America, pot possession so minor it is not even a misdemeanor can cause caring parents to lose custody of their children, because welfare offices may charge them with neglect, regardless of how good a parent they are. The legal ramifications of pot use may make parents who want to smoke marijuana more likely to drink alcohol, which is much more likely to create abusive or otherwise harmful behavior.

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Mad in America
January 23, 2012
by Jonathan Leo, Ph.D. / Jeffrey Lacasse, Ph.D. RSS


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The psychiatry profession has finally come clean and confessed on a national media outlet that there is no evidence to support the Serotonin Theory of Depression. Today, on NPR’s Morning Edition there is a segment about the chemical imbalance theory, and virtually all the psychiatrists who are interviewed acknowledge that the there was never any evidence in support of the idea that low serotonin causes depression. But then, amazingly, they go on to say that it is perfectly fine to tell patients that serotonin imbalance causes depression even though they know this isn’t the case.

Several years ago in PLoS Medicine we wrote a long piece about the serotonin theory and the disconnect between what research psychiatrists say in professional journals and textbooks and what the advertisements say. While the advertisements presented the theory as scientific fact, the scientific sources clearly did not. Given the enormous marketing programs that pushed this theory combined with the media’s lack of skepticism, we were sympathetic to the general public who could hardly be faulted for thinking that theory had some foundation in fact. Following the publication of our piece a reporter contacted us and suggested that we were attacking a well accepted theory. We pointed out to the reporter that we weren’t attacking a sacred cow but that instead we were pointing out the mainstream psychiatry didn’t even accept this theory. We urged the reporter to contact the FDA, NIMH, APA, etc and ask them about the science behind the advertisements. He did, and as expected, an expert from the FDA explained that the theory was really just a metaphor. The problem is that patients who heard their physician explain the serotonin theory thought they were hearing real science. They weren’t told it was a metaphor and hence thought it was a fact. When a doctor talks about high cholesterol, diabetes, or hypothyroidism, they are talking about scientific measurement, not a metaphor. How is a patient with high cholesterol and depression who listens to their doctor’s explanation of their conditions supposed to know when the doctor has moved from science to metaphor?

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The Independent
22 January 2012
By Sarah Morrison and Jaymi McCann

A drug intended to prevent miscarriage is blamed for causing cancer in the daughters – and possibly even granddaughters – of women who took it decades ago.

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Tens of thousands of British families are to be asked if they are victims of a drug given to pregnant women which can cause fatal illness in the second, and possibly even third, generations. Some women given the drug in this country have already obtained compensation in America.

Diethylstilboestrol (DES), a drug given to women for 30 years up to 1973, has been found to cause a rare form of vaginal and cervical cancer in some of the daughters of the women who took it, as well as fertility problems. Compensation of an estimated $1.5bn has been paid out in the US. There is even a suspicion that DES – known as the "silent Thalidomide" – can affect the grandchildren of those who took it.

Legal action against the 14 different drug companies that sold and promoted DES from the early 1940s to 1970s is being brought by at least 80 women in the US, who all believe that the synthetic form of oestrogen, given to their mothers in an effort to reduce miscarriages, caused them to develop breast cancer years later. Their lawyer, Aaron Levine, will travel to the UK in two weeks' time to co-ordinate a hunt for the "DES daughters" in this country who have been unable to get compensation in British courts.

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