Vaxxed: How did they threaten Robert De Niro?

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De Niro talked to Congressman about censored Vaxxed film

by Jon Rappoport

“On July 26, 2000, the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association published a review by Dr. Barbara Starfield, a revered public-health expert at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Dr. Starfield’s review, ‘Is US health really the best in the world?’, concluded that, every year in the US, the medical system kills 225,000 people. That’s 2.25 million killings per decade.” (Jon Rappoport, The Starfield Revelation)

This is explosive.

This is about a film no one can see, because it exposes lunatics and destroyers in the vaccine industry

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As you are probably aware, the criticism over the pulling of the film Vaxxed: From Cover Up To Catastrophe lead to an in-depth investigation into the actual ownership of the Tribeca Film Festival, leading us down the rabbit hole into the land of billionaires and Big Pharma and, of course, prominent politicians. That story can be found here.

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Parents who fail to vaccinate their children in Uganda will face six months in jail, according to a new law signed by President Yoweri Museveni.

It also requires children to have an immunisation card to allow them to go to school.

The law will help the government reach its vaccination target, Health Minister Sarah Achieng Opendi told the BBC.

Some parents and members of a religious cult have refused to allow their children vaccinated, she says.

The government's vaccination campaign targets several life-threatening diseases including polio and meningitis.

In 2015, the World Health Organization estimated that 70 children out of every 1,000 will die before they reached the age of five in Uganda.

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WHO Backs Trials of Bacteria, Genetic Modification to Fight Zika Mosquitoes

Methods will be used in combination with other traditional tools

By Kate Kelland

LONDON (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) called on Friday for pilot projects to test two experimental ways to curb Zika-carrying mosquitoes, including testing the release of genetically modified insects and bacteria that stop their eggs hatching.

Zika virus, which is sweeping through the Americas, is transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which the U.N. health body has described as an "opportunistic and tenacious menace".

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Overdose on Prescription Opioid Pain Killers

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According to a January 2016 CDC report,1 over 47,000 Americans fatally overdosed on prescription opioid pain killers in 2014. This is a stunning fact. But almost as stunning is the apparent lack of concern expressed by the world's media when reporting it. The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, for example, thought it worth a mere 214 words.2 NBC News was obviously more excited and pushed their coverage to a hefty 223 words.3 And even those who pushed their word totals up slightly higher ignored the real stories hidden behind the headlines.

With that in mind, let's take a look at the CDC report in detail--which virtually no news service did--and then explore the backstory that was pretty much ignored outside of a couple of surprising journalistic players. And finally, I want to take a look a stunning twist to the story that absolutely no one looked at but that to my mind is really the most important takeaway from the whole debacle.

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Pharmaceutical industry: A dose of reality

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Pharmaceutical industry: A dose of reality


FOR years, African countries have paid exorbitant amounts for pharmaceuticals developed in the US, including drugs such as AZT, which is used to treat Aids.

The reasoning was always that it cost pharmaceutical companies upwards of US$1bn to create these drugs — and these costs must be recouped.

But a new investigation of the murky tax breaks used by the industry tell another story entirely.

Take the case of Puerto Rico, a small island in the Caribbean which is officially a US territory. It may seem unlikely, but in the late 1990s and early 2000s, Puerto Rico became a destination for drug companies seeking to make use of its status as a tax haven. There, one of the small coastal towns, called Barceloneta, was even dubbed “Ciudad Viagra”, as it churned out 100m of Pfizer’s little blue pills.

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The report Big Pharma doesn't like at all

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The report Big Pharma doesn't like at all

In case you missed it, the pharmaceutical industry took a beating last year over drug prices.

Remember Martin Shkreli, the grinning, villainous poster child for pharmaceutical greed, who raised the price of a lifesaving drug, Daraprim, by 5,000 percent overnight?

And Valeant Pharmaceuticals, which raised the price of two heart drugs by 500 percent and 200 percent?

And Questcor Pharmaceuticals, which raised the price of a multiple sclerosis drug from $1,235 a vial to more than $29,000?

By early fall, the issue of soaring drug prices reached a boiling point, sparking front page headlines, Congressional hearings, and denunciations by nearly every presidential candidate.

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A Sydney law firm has launched a class action on behalf of people who as children and adolescents were prescribed the anti-depressant drug Paroxetine.

Drayton Sher Lawyers has called for expressions of interest from people who were prescribed the drug, commonly known as Aropax in Australia, when they were 18 or younger.

Solicitor Tony Nikolic​ said hundreds of people had indicated they would join the class action, which he expects to file in the Federal Court at the end of May.


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Vitamin D supplements taken during pregnancy do not improve bone mass in babies compared with placebo overall; however, those born in winter months did gain significant bone benefits from maternal vitamin D supplementation, show results of the Maternal Vitamin D Osteoporosis Study (MAVIDOS) study, published online March 1 in Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology.

MAVIDOS is the first randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of pregnant women taking vitamin D on offspring bone mass, and initial results were reported at the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research meeting last October.

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50% hike in antidepressant use in UK children

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50% hike in antidepressant use in UK children

Prescriptions for antidepressants in children rose 54% between 2005 and 2012 in the UK, an international study has revealed.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) said it was ‘very concerned’ by the rise in use of the drugs in children both in the UK and other countries which it said was ‘not justified’.

Similar increases of 60% in Denmark and 49% in Germany were recorded over the same period, while antidepressant use in children went up by 26% in the USA and 17% in The Netherlands.

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