Price of AIDS Drug Intensifies Debate on Legal Imports

By GARDINER HARRIS
Published: April 14, 2004
Original: The New York Times

The recent decision by Abbott Laboratories to quintuple the price of its crucial AIDS drug Norvir will be at the center of a federal hearing today in which AIDS groups and consumer advocates plan to argue that the government should begin allowing the import of cheaper drugs.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

October 18, 1997
More vitamin C means fewer cataracts
by J. Raloff
Source: Science News

Women who took vitamin C supplements for at least 10 years proved only 23 percent as likely to develop cataracts as women who received the vitamin only in their diet, a new study finds.

Allen Taylor of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston has been probing the relationship between cataracts and antioxidant vitamins, such as vitamin C, for more than a decade. Initially working with eye tissue in the laboratory, he and his colleagues have shown that vitamin C can slow the chemical reactions that make certain lens proteins clump together, causing cataracts. The group then demonstrated that giving animals the vitamin retarded cataract development.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)


Vitamin C can reduce levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation and chronic disease

By: News-Medical
Source: News-Medical.net
Published: Monday, 12-Apr-2004
 
Vitamin C supplements can reduce levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation and chronic disease risk in humans, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)


Study shows lutein reverses macular degeneration

By Thomas H. Maugh II / Los Angeles Times
Source: The Detroit News
Saturday, April 10, 2004

Lutein, a yellow pigment found in dark green leafy vegetables like spinach, kale and collard greens, can reverse some of the symptoms of age-related macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of visual disability in the United States, according to a new study.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

[ AIDS: Scientific or Viral Catastrophe? - part 1 ]

Disillusionment Over Antiviral Drug Treatments

To escape embarrassment over the failed predictions, AIDS experts have argued that anti-viral drug treatments are responsible for the decline in AIDS. This is hard to reconcile with the fact that the decline started well before the more recent drug treatments were introduced; or with the unsatisfactory record of these treatments.

AZT, the early "gold standard" of treatment, is now widely understood to have killed more patients than it helped (that is putting it kindly - there has been minimal evidence of help, beyond a broad, temporary, anti-microbial effect). The longest and most thorough trial of the drug, the Anglo-French Concorde trial, found 25% more deaths among those treated early than in those for whom treatment was deferred. The difference would almost certainly have been larger if the deferred treatment group had been a genuine control and had been kept AZT-free. The drug made no difference in terms of progression to AIDS or Aids-related illnesses. In a separate analysis of data from the first year there was a slight advantage to being in the immediate-treatment group; this lost statistical significance by 18 months.[76] Despite intense efforts by the drug’s manufacturers to minimise the significance of these results, AZT is now known to have caused much harm, and possibly many thousands of deaths.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Journal of Scientific Exploration, Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 87-120, 2003

AIDS: Scientific or Viral Catastrophe?

by Neville Hodgkinson
Original Source: AltHeal.org
 

Abstract - Despite more than $100 billion spent on AIDS by US taxpayers alone, scientists have not been able to ascertain how HIV causes the AIDS syndrome. Predictions about the course of the epidemic have proved inaccurate. While millions are said to be infected and dying in Africa, AIDS deaths have fallen in Europe and the USA and now total fewer than 250 a year in the UK, which has a population of nearly 60 million. Claims that cocktails of antiviral drugs are responsible for a decline in Western AIDS are unsupported by clear evidence. On the contrary, the US Government has reversed a policy of "hit hard, hit early" in HIV-positive people, citing "unexpected toxicities" from the drugs. The HIV theory of AIDS causation has fulfilled certain social and public health needs, but the scientific community has not acknowledged or addressed serious flaws in AIDS theory and medical practice, in particular a failure to validate "HIV" diagnostic tests against isolation of virus. Genetic and chemical signals produced by disordered immune cells may have been misinterpreted as evidence of the presence of a lethal virus. There is vast over-diagnosis of AIDS and "HIV disease" in Africa and other countries where malnutrition and grossly impoverished living circumstances, with associated infections, are the real killers. The harmful consequences of these mistakes and omissions are increasing now that the World Health Organisation and UNAIDS, convinced of an African pandemic, are urging finance ministers of African countries to devote more domestic funds to HIV/AIDS activities. On the other hand, if debt relief and other emergency aid for which UNAIDS is also campaigning are used appropriately, enormous relief of human suffering will be possible. A reasoned response from the scientific community to the full range of evidence challenging the HIV theory is overdue.

Keywords: HIV---AIDS---HIV test---poverty---Africa---virus isolation

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Vitamin fights prostate cancer
Source: BBC NEWS - Monday, 12 April, 2004

Peppers contain vitamin E
Vitamin E can protect men from prostate cancer, according to researchers.

Men with high levels of the alpha tocopherol form of vitamin E were 53 per cent less likely to develop prostate cancer.

The researchers stressed it was better to take vitamin E from fresh food than supplements.

The US National Cancer Institute study was presented at the American Association of Cancer Research annual meeting in Orlando.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)
Cholesterol Drugs Tied to Birth Defects

U.S. government study finds an unusually high number of abnormalities in babies of women who took statins during first trimester of pregnancy.

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter (Souce: Health Central)

WEDNESDAY, April 7 (HealthDayNews) -- If you're pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant, there's one more group of medications to add to the long list of drugs you shouldn't take because they can harm your baby: the cholesterol-lowering medications called statins.

Researchers from the U.S. National Institutes of Health found that statin use during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with severe central nervous system defects and limb deformities.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)
Indian children living in villages where they are exposed to dangerously high levels of pesticides have poor memories and impaired analytical and motor skills, Greenpeace warned Friday.
Source: Terra Daily

Poisons From Afar Threaten Arctic Mothers, Traditions
Toxins, Coming North by Air and Water, Enter Inuit Food Chain By DeNeen L. Brown
Washington Post Foreign Service - Sunday, April 11, 2004; Page A25

IQALUIT, Nunavut -- The dark season had ended, and a fierce Arctic wind was howling across the icy sea as Lucy Qavavauq finished a supper of caribou soup. After dishes were put away at her friend's home, she sat down to nurse her firstborn child. As the baby fed, the mother wondered whether her 9-month-old boy was drinking poison -- contaminants found in tests of Inuit who eat caribou and other Arctic animals.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)
Antidepressants for kids may be 'hyped'
Anna Salleh
ABC Science Online (Source: News In Science) Monday, 12 April  2004 

Antidepressants in children: do the risks outweigh the benefits?
Children and adolescents are being prescribed antidepressants largely on the basis of industry-funded studies that exaggerate the drugs' benefits and downplay their risks, says an Australian-led team.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Health Supreme News

Loading...
Powered by Movable Type 5.13-en

Receive updates

Subscribe to get updates of this site by email:

Enter your Email


Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz

Recent Comments

Other sites of ours