Vaccinating The World's Poor
Glaxo is betting it can combat Third World scourges -- and still make money
Source: Business Week

Jean Stephenne is an unlikely revolutionary. The president of GSK Biologicals, the vaccine subsidiary of GlaxoSmithKline PLC (GSK ), is unusually soft-spoken, almost shy. But his gentle demeanor belies a bold risk-taker willing to gamble hundreds of millions of dollars on vaccines to combat diseases in the world's poorest countries.

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Stevia: A miracle sweetener, and you can grow your own
By Laurel Dewey
April 23, 2004
Source: Post Indipendent

Dear Humorous Herbalist,
I hear that stevia is a sweetener that is supposed to be good for you. Is it too good to be true? How about the stuff it’s mixed with, including maltodextrin in the powder or some form of alcohol in the extracts? Are those okay or do they counteract the good in it? Why are the pure varieties more expensive? Are they that much better? Also, can a person grow their own? If so, where can one pick up the plant, and how would a person use the fresh leaves? Thanks.
— Sharon (via e-mail)

Dear Sharon,
Stevia has been used for thousands of years as a natural, safe, non-addictive, virtually non-caloric sweetener. However, stevia does not have any sugar compounds — it simply tastes sweet and tricks the body and mind into believing one is eating sugar.

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Animal Pharm
by Mark Purdey
Source: Weston A. Price Foundation

Note: As an organic farmer, Mark Purdey resisted the order to spray his cattle with organophosphates for warble fly and went to court for a judicial review; he won and was exempted from using the spray. No cows born in his herd developed BSE (mad cow disease). He has contributed numerous articles on the subject of BSE to scientific journals. He farms in Somerset, UK. This article appeared in Wise Traditions in Food, Farming and the Healing Arts, the quarterly magazine of the Weston A. Price Foundation, Spring 2000
As the first snowstorm of winter hit the isolated hill where I farm, I pitched out the last forkfuls of hay to my cattle before nightfall. Much like the whirlwinds of snow surging all around me, my brain was turning over and over the catalogue of injustices that successive governments had levied onto the farming community over BSE. I felt paralysed and powerless in the encroaching snowstorm.
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Pesticides too harmful to use in any form, doctors warn
By ALANNA MITCHELL
Saturday, April 24, 2004 - Page A1
Source: Globeandmail.com

The link between common household pesticides and fetal defects, neurological damage and the most deadly cancers is strong enough that family doctors in Ontario are urging citizens to avoid the chemicals in any form.

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The protective effects of ascorbic acid on arterial haemodynamics during acute hyperglycaemia.
Source: Pub Med
1: Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2004 Apr 15 [Epub ahead of print]

Mullan BA, Ennis CN, Fee HJ, Young IS, McCance DR.

Department of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine, Queen's University, Belfast, United Kingdom; Regional Centre for Endocrinology & Diabetes, The Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, United Kingdom.

Mortality increases when acute coronary syndromes are complicated by stressinduced hyperglycaemia. Early pulse wave reflection can augment central aortic systolic blood pressure and increase left ventricular strain.

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Prozac linked to increased cancer growth
NewScientist.com news service
18:35 26 March 02

 Prozac may encourage the development of certain types of cancer by blocking the body's natural ability to destroy the diseased cells, new research suggests.

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Unpublished data reverses risk-benefit of drugs
NewScientist.com news service
16:20 23 April 04

 Unpublished studies on the effects of anti-depressant drugs on children suggest some are both ineffective and potentially harmful, according to a new review of research. The unpublished data contradict published results, fuelling the debate on how pharmaceutical companies reveal trial data.

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Negative drug research 'withheld'
Source: BBC News

Drug companies have been accused of failing to publish drug trials which do not give the "right" result.

Regulatory bodies found it harder to make balanced decisions when negative information was not available, the Lancet medical journal said.

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You Can't Trust The Drug 'Experts'
April 13, 2004 - The Ottawa Citizen (CN ON)
By Dan Gardner

Source: The November Coalition

'One night's ecstasy use can cause brain damage," shouted a newspaper headline in September 2002, after the journal Science published a study that found a single dose of the drug ecstasy injected into monkeys and baboons caused terrible brain damage. Two of the 10 primates in the study had even died.

The media trumpeted the news around the world and drug enforcement officials held it up as definitive proof of the vileness of ecstasy.

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Depressing News on Depression
New York Times

Published: April 23, 2004

Antidepressant drugs are being widely administered to children and adolescents despite increasing concern that the benefits have been oversold and some potentially dangerous side effects minimized. The jury is still out on whether the modest benefits of some of these drugs outweigh the small risks they impose. But the escalating debate makes us wonder, uneasily, whether doctors have been dispensing the pills far too cavalierly despite a dearth of evidence to support their value.

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