National Autism Association Questions IOM and CDC Cover-Up -- How Far Will They go to Protect Toxic Vaccines?

18/05/2004
Source: PrNewswire.com

Riddled With Conflicts of Interest, Institute of Medicine Releases Report
         Derived From Flawed Data, Says National Autism Association

   WASHINGTON, May 18 /PRNewswire/ -- A report released today has parents and
researchers shocked at how far the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and Centers for
Disease Control (CDC) will go to protect the reputation of the vaccination
program. After CDC-funded hearings were held in front of an IOM panel on
February 9th regarding the connection between vaccines and autism, IOM
released its decision today by stating there is no connection, despite strong
clinical evidence from accredited doctors and researchers that suggests
otherwise.

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Taxpayers bear cost of vaccine risk
Chris Jones, national political reporter
17may04

THE manufacturer of Australia's emergency supply of smallpox vaccine has been indemnified by the Government against any compensation claims lodged by people who experience "adverse reactions" to the medication.

The guarantee exposes taxpayers to possible compensation claims worth billions of dollars from the 50,000 defence personnel, emergency medical staff and laboratory workers who would be injected with the vaccine in the event of a bioterrorism attack.

Last week's Federal Budget disclosed the compensation guarantee in a 17-page list of future risks to the Government's coffers.

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U.N. supports genetically modified crops despite public opposition

By NICOLE WINFIELD
Associated Press Writer
Source: NPI center

ROME -- Genetically modified crops are helping poor farmers and have posed no adverse health or environmental effects so far, the U.N. food agency said Monday in a report on how biotechnology can help feed the world's hungry.

The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization called for greater government regulation and monitoring of genetically modified, or transgenic, products to ensure they are safely used and said more research is needed on their long-term health and environmental impacts.

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Protein marker troponin I predicts possible heart damage after chemotherapy
18 May 2004   
Source: Medical News Today

High levels of troponin I (TNI) protein in the blood helps identify possible heart damage after cancer treatment, according to a report in today's rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

The report also suggests that tracking TNI levels can help doctors form a heart disease prevention plan for some chemotherapy patients. "Damage to the heart is one of the most worrisome long-term side effects of high-dose chemotherapy," said lead author Daniela Cardinale, M.D., deputy director of the cardiology unit at the European Institute of Oncology in Milan, Italy. "Therefore, it is important to identify biochemical markers that might indicate which patients are at greatest risk and how severe their heart disease might be."

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Angioplasty or bypass surgery patients with money problems have double the mortality rate
18 May 2004   
Source: Medical News Today

Heart patients who had angioplasty or bypass surgery and felt burdened by medical costs were more than twice as likely to die within a year of their procedure as patients who didn't have trouble paying for healthcare, according to a study presented today at the American Heart Association's 5th annual Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke.

Many studies have found an association between socioeconomic status and cardiovascular death, but they had not analyzed how patients' perceptions of economic burden affect cardiovascular survival.

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Consumer Group Seeks Cholesterol Drug Ban
Source: Dr Koop.com

The consumer advocacy group Public Citizen is once again calling on the federal government to ban a newly marketed cholesterol-lowering drug because of what it calls dangerous side effects.

In a letter to the acting director of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Public Citizen said AstraZeneca's Crestor (rosuvastatin) could lead to a life-threatening muscle disease called rhabdomyolosis. Users are also at greater risk of kidney failure, the group said, citing FDA statistics.

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AstraZeneca Cautions Doctors on High Dose Crestor
Mon May 17, 2004 05:39 PM ET

By Mark Potter and Ben Hirschler
Source: Reuters.com

LONDON (Reuters) - AstraZeneca Plc has warned British doctors to stick to the label and not start patients on high doses of new cholesterol drug Crestor following four cases of a condition that can lead to kidney damage.

The company said on Monday it had told health-care professionals in a letter that patients should not be started directly on the higher 40 mg dose but should be given 10 mg initially, with doses increasing to 20-40 mg as required.

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A Dietary Mineral You Need (and Probably Didn't Know It)
By JANE E. BRODY

Published: May 18, 2004
Source: New York Times

A health-conscious woman asked me the other day whether she should be taking magnesium with her calcium. I thought not, but that was before I had examined the many studies defining the role of this too-often-ignored mineral nutrient.

Magnesium is important to nearly every function and tissue in the body, from the heart to the bones and nearly everything in between. It plays a critical role in a vast array of acute and chronic diseases. Some 350 enzyme functions depend on it, including the enzyme that generates energy for every cell in the body.

But studies strongly suggest that when it comes to magnesium, most of us may be running on less than a full tank.

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Making Drugs, Shaping the Rules
By MELODY PETERSEN
1 February 2004 The New York Times

THE drug industry has created vast markets for products like Viagra, Celebrex and Vioxx by spending billions of dollars on consumer advertising.

But to sell medicines that treat schizophrenia, the companies focus on a much smaller group of customers: state officials who oversee treatment for many people with serious mental illness. Those patients -- in mental hospitals, at mental health clinics and on Medicaid -- make states among the largest buyers of antipsychotic drugs.

For Big Pharma, success in the halls of government has required a different set of marketing tactics. Since the mid-1990's, a group of drug companies, led by Johnson & Johnson, has campaigned to convince state officials that a new generation of drugs -- with names like Risperdal, Zyprexa and Seroquel -- is superior to older and much cheaper antipsychotics like Haldol. The campaign has led a dozen states to adopt guidelines for treating schizophrenia that make it hard for doctors to prescribe anything but the new drugs. That, in turn, has helped transform the new medicines into blockbusters.

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The natural treatment of hypertension
Wilburn AJ, King DS, Glisson J, Rockhold RW, Wofford MR.
Source: Pub Med

University of Mississippi Medical Center, Division of Hypertension, Jackson, MS 39216 mwofford@medicine.umsmed.edu

The goal of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of commonly available dietary supplements in the treatment of hypertension, using the average blood pressure reduction achieved with the implementation of lifestyle modifications as a standard.

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