Public 'fear pesticide in foods'
26 June, 2004
Source: BBC News

Most Britons are worried about traces of pesticides in food, a poll by organic milk suppliers suggests.

Of the 1,000 people questioned in an NOP survey, 77% said people should be concerned about food pesticide levels.

Half of those questioned were not convinced maximum pesticide residue levels set by the government are safe.

But Dr Ian Brown, of the government's Pesticide Residues Committee (PRC), said only "absolutely minute" traces were ever found and tests were robust.

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Sud African Defies AIDS Through Diet, Will to Live
Tue Jun 29, 8:13 AM ET
By Jonah Fisher
Source: Yahoo News

ASMARA, Eritrea (Reuters) -  David Patient is no ordinary man. Diagnosed HIV-positive 21 years ago, the tanned South African has the confidence of a man who knows that every day he defies medical odds just by being alive.

He doesn't take anti-retroviral drugs and attributes his longevity to a tough dietary regime and an unbending will to live.

Now at age 43 he's taking his message around Africa in the hope of encouraging other HIV-positive people to do the same and offering ways for those who are not infected to stay that way.

"I'm not saying let's stop condoms, let's stop awareness," he said during a break in a course he was running for the United Nations in Eritrea.

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Drug Maker Acknowledges Some Negative Test Results
By BARRY MEIER
Published: June 26, 2004
Source: New York Times

Forest Laboratories has said a recently concluded test found that its antidepressant Lexapro did not help depressed children and adolescents, an announcement that comes amid the growing controversy over clinical drug tests.

The company's announcement is significant because Lexapro contains essentially the same active ingredient as another Forest antidepressant, Celexa, which is widely prescribed for pediatric use.

The company made its announcement late Thursday, when it also released a second statement addressing how it had handled its disclosure of results from two trials of Celexa in depressed children.

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As Doctors Write Prescriptions, Drug Company Writes a Check
By GARDINER HARRIS
Published: June 27, 2004
Source: New York Times

he check for $10,000 arrived in the mail unsolicited. The doctor who received it from the drug maker  Schering-Plough said it was made out to him personally in exchange for an attached "consulting" agreement that required nothing other than his commitment to prescribe the company's medicines. Two other physicians said in separate interviews that they, too, received checks unbidden from Schering-Plough, one of the world's biggest drug companies.

"I threw mine away," said the first doctor, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of concern about being drawn into a federal inquiry into the matter.

Those checks and others, some of them said to be for six-figure sums, are under investigation by federal prosecutors in Boston as part of a broad government crackdown on the drug industry's marketing tactics. Just about every big global drug company — including  Johnson & Johnson,  Wyeth and  Bristol-Myers Squibb — has disclosed in securities filings that it has received a federal subpoena, and most are juggling subpoenas stemming from several investigations.

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Infant Fluoride Intake Risky And Unnecessary
Originally Published: 2004-04-01
Source: HealthWorld Online

Infant formulas prepared with fluoridated water increase dental fluorosis risk, according to the April 2004 Journal of the American College of Nutrition and other studies. To prevent this tooth staining, researchers caution against mixing infant formulas with fluoridated water.

Fluorosis, white-spotted, yellow or brown stained, sometimes pitted or crumbly teeth, is the too-late warning sign that babies overdosed on fluoride. Neither a nutrient nor essential to health, fluoride can also damage bones.

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Aspirin therapy does not prevent strokes in about half the population
27 Jun 2004
Source: Medical News Today

If you have a stroke, or a transient ishcemic attack (TIA) that is caused by a blocked blood vessel you will go to hospital and be put on aspirin therapy. According to Dr. Mark Alberts, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, 47% of us are resistant to aspirin therapy – it offers us no protection. He said 47% of us have ‘aspirin resistance, this is defined as a clotting time of 171 seconds or less.

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Dynamic flow: resolving the vitamin C controversy
28 Jun 2004
Source: Medical New Today

“The dynamic flow model is the most important result in the history of vitamin C”
The Vitamin C Foundation

Summary

Ten years after the death of Linus Pauling, a new scientific model validates his ideas and resolves the vitamin C controversy. It explains how vitamin C can prevent, treat or cure the major diseases of modern times.

This year is the tenth anniversary of the death of Linus Pauling. Pauling was one of the greatest scientists who ever lived: a colossus of chemistry. In his early years, he revolutionised chemistry before moving on to biology and medicine.

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82 percent of doctors admit seeing colleagues making fatal errors
London | June 28, 2004 4:44:01 PM IST
Source: Web India
 
82 percent of doctors in Britain have admitted to having seen their colleagues making mistakes while treating patients.

According to the survey conducted on 2500 doctors by website, doctors.net,uk., only 15 percent of these errors were reported with 13 percent leading to patient death or disability.


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Doubt cast over Alzheimer's drugs
24 June, 2004
Source: BBC News

Drugs widely used to treat Alzheimer's disease have little actual benefit, controversial research suggests.

The National Institute for Clinical Excellence recommended in 2001 that cholinesterase inhibitors should be prescribed on the NHS.

But a five-year Lancet study by the University of Birmingham concludes that routine prescribing of the drugs is a waste of scarce resources.

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Waxman: U.S. Imposes New Limits on Scientists
Fri Jun 25, 2004 12:32 AM ET
Source: Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. government is making it harder for scientists to speak to their global colleagues and restricting who can attend an upcoming major AIDS conference, a congressman charged on Thursday.

Rep. Henry Waxman said he has a letter showing that the Health and Human Services Department has imposed new limits on who may speak to the World Health Organization.

Under the new policy, WHO must ask HHS for permission to speak to scientists and must allow HHS to choose who will respond.

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