1: Schweiz Rundsch Med Prax. 2004 May 12;93(20):857-63.
Souce: Ncbi - Pub Med

Forgotten metabolic side effects of diuretics: lipids, glucose and vitamin B1 (thiamin) metabolism

Suter PM.

Medizinische Poliklinik, Universitatsspital Zurich.

Diuretics could lead to an impairment of lipid and glucose metabolism. These potentially adverse effects of the diuretics could be compensated by non-pharmacological strategies such as weight loss or physical activity.

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AARP: Drug Prices Increase Faster Than Inflation
Drug Makers Say Increases Match The Rise In All Healthcare Costs

POSTED: 5:11 pm EDT July 1, 2004
Source: nbc6.net

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- A new study finds that prescription drug prices are rising faster than the rate of inflation. The nation's senior advocacy group AARP is calling it an outrage.

The new study concludes that prescription drug prices are soaring, confirming the worst fears of seniors

"They're angry and they're scared because these are drugs that they need to stay healthy and stay alive," said John Rother of AAPR

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Monsanto Likely Phasing Out Controversial Bovine Growth Hormone
Are Rats Jumping Off Posilac Ship?

From Milkweed, Issue #299, June 2004

While Monsanto remains quiet about the fate of its genetically
engineered cow hormone, Posilac, signs are that more rats are jumping off
the ship.

In late January 2004, Monsanto announced a 50% reduction in sales of
Posilac to regular customers. That followed a December 19, 2003
announcement of a 15% cutback.

The Milkweed reported of a Posilac sales force meeting in March, at
which numerous sales persons were terminated by Monsanto. Other Posilac
sales personnel are rumored to be aggressively seeking their next employment
opportunity.

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Medicines 'killing 10,000 people'
Source: BBC News
BBC News Thursday, 1 July, 2004, 23:28 GMT 00:28 UK

More than 10,000 Britons may be dying each year because of bad reactions to medication, a study suggests.


Researchers at the University of Liverpool assessed 18,820 people admitted to two hospitals in Merseyside between November 2001 and April 2002.

They found that one in 16 had been admitted because of an adverse reaction to drugs such as aspirin. Some 28 died.

Writing in the British Medical Journal, they said nationally the number of deaths could top 10,000 a year.

Adverse reaction

The researchers found that 1,225 people were admitted to these two hospitals over the six-month period because of an adverse drug reaction.

Many were taking aspirin or other painkillers, known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

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Vitamins found to slow AIDS

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Vitamins found to slow AIDS
Researchers say effects of vitamins B, C and E are especially important in Africa, where people are often malnourished and can't get AIDS drugs

By ANNE McILROY
SCIENCE REPORTER
Thursday, July 1, 2004 - Page A15
Source: The Globe and Mail

Multivitamin supplements can delay the need for anti-retroviral drugs in people with HIV-AIDS, new research has found.

In an eight-year experiment involving 1,078 Kenyan women, scientists found that vitamins significantly slowed the progression of the infectious disease. They say their findings could be especially important in Africa, where the World Health Organization plans to treat three million people with drug cocktails that have saved the lives of thousands of patients in Western countries.

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Our Deadly Diabetes Deception

Greed and dishonest science have promoted a lucrative worldwide epidemic of diabetes that honesty and good science can quickly reverse by naturally restoring the body's blood-sugar control mechanism.

Extracted from Nexus Magazine, Volume 11, Number 4 (June-July 2004)
PO Box 30, Mapleton Qld 4560 Australia. editor@nexusmagazine.com
Telephone: +61 (0)7 5442 9280; Fax: +61 (0)7 5442 9381
From our web page at: http://www.nexusmagazine.com

by Thomas Smith © 2004
PO Box 7685
Loveland, CO 80537 USA
Email: Valley@healingmatters.com
Website: http://www.Healingmatters.com

Introduction
If you are an American diabetic, your physician will never tell you that most cases of diabetes are curable. In fact, if you even mention the "cure" word around him, he will likely become upset and irrational. His medical school training only allows him to respond to the word "treatment". For him, the "cure" word does not exist. Diabetes, in its modern epidemic form, is a curable disease and has been for at least 40 years. In 2001, the most recent year for which US figures are posted, 934,550 Americans died from out-of-control symptoms of this disease.1

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Mercury is in tuna, flu shots

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Editorial: Mercury is in tuna, flu shots
Know the risks and avoid them

July 1, 2004
Source: Ventura County Star

Tuna and flu vaccines have one thing in common: mercury. That has put them in the news of late, and the public needs to pay attention, as mercury at certain levels can damage the brains of fetuses and children.

Regarding tuna, California Attorney General Bill Lockyer sued the three largest producers of tuna in the country June 21 for not posting warnings to consumers about mercury levels in the popular fish.

Regarding flu vaccines, Assemblywoman Fran Pavley, D-Agoura Hills, is pushing a bill to ban mercury from vaccines given to infants and pregnant women. The flu vaccine is the latest recommended universal childhood immunization that contains the mercury-containing preservative, thimerosal. Assembly Bill 2943 was passed June 23 on a 10-to-2 vote by the state Senate Committee on Health and Human Services.

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Multivitamin found to slow pace of HIV
Study examined Tanzanian women

By Stephen Smith, Globe Staff  | July 1, 2004
Source: Boston.com

A simple multivitamin taken once a day dramatically slowed the progression of HIV in pregnant women in Tanzania, Harvard researchers report today, a finding that could herald a low-cost option for reducing disease and prolonging life in countries where more expensive treatments remain out of reach.

The study from the Harvard School of Public Health offers the most robust evidence ever that nutritional supplements can help keep the AIDS virus in check and delay debilitating symptoms.

It is also an illustration of how, in the quest to find novel treatments, scientists sometimes overlook off-the-shelf products that come with few side effects and modest price tags.

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The defiance of science

More than 4,000 scientists have signed a petition accusing George Bush of twisting their work to further his political agenda. Andrew Buncombe investigates the war between the White House and the men in white coats

29 June 2004
Source: The Indipendent

For Michael Greene, there was little hesitation. The Harvard professor has spent much of his life working in the field of reproductive health, and when - in his capacity as a member of a federal advisory committee - he was asked his opinion about a new emergency contraception, he had few doubts about recommending that it be licensed.

And neither did the overwhelming majority of his colleagues on the committee, formed by the US federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Indeed, the distinguished panel voted 23-4 in favour of selling the "morning after" pill Plan B without prescription. The FDA almost always follows its experts' recommendations.

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Vitamin C May Ward Off Stroke

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Vitamin C May Ward Off Stroke
Source: ajc.com/health

TUESDAY, Nov. 11 (HealthDayNews) -- People who eat a diet rich in vitamin C may be at lower risk of suffering strokes, and smokers who do so may benefit the most.

A new Dutch study finds people with the lowest amount of vitamin C in their diets were 30 percent more likely to have a stroke than people with the highest amount of it.

People with the highest amount of vitamin C in their diets consumed more than 133 milligrams of vitamin C per day. People with the lowest amount in their diets got less than 95 milligrams per day. The recommended daily amount is 60 milligrams a day.

Smokers with diets high in vitamin C were more than 70 percent less likely to have a stroke than smokers with diets low in vitamin C.

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