The Nature of Cancer

by Ernst Krebs, Jr.

Source: Seed of Faith

(Presented before CCS Second annual Cancer Convention, Ambassador Hotel, Los Angeles, California )

It is certainly a pleasure to be here at the Second Annual Convention of the Cancer Control Society-an outgrowth, as you know, of the International Association of Cancer Victims and Friends.

As I look back through the years marketing the emergence of these two fine Societies, I can recall the number of miraculous victories we have had in those intervening years;that it is as true today as it was eleven years ago that Laetrile, Vitamin B17, is the first and last final hope in the prophylacsis in therapy of cancer in man and animals. The reason for this is that Laetrile is a vitamin. It is the 17th of the B vitamins.

We hear a great deal about its use in terminal cancer, but the time to start with vitamin B17 is now before the disease become clinical. The time to start is the same with any matter of adequate nutrition and that is right now. You may start now by commencing to eat the seeds of all common fruits that you eat. The apricot and peach seed contain almost 2 percent of vitamin B17 by weight. The apple seed, although very small, is equally rich in Vitamin B17. So are the seeds of prunes, plums, cherries, and nectarines. The only common fruit on the hemisphere that lacks nitrilosidic seeds, are the citrus fruits. This lack has come about by artificial cultivation by breeding and hybridization, since the seeds of citrus fruits on the African continent still contain Vitamin B17.

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Many Youths Reported Held Awaiting Mental Help
By ROBERT PEAR

Published: July 8, 2004
Source: New York Times

WASHINGTON, July 7 - Congressional investigators said Wednesday that 15,000 children with psychiatric disorders were improperly incarcerated last year because no mental health services were available.

The figures were compiled by the Democratic staff of the House Committee on Government Reform in the first such nationwide survey of juvenile detention centers.

"The use of juvenile detention facilities to warehouse children with mental disorders is a serious national problem,'' said Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, who sought the survey with Representative Henry A. Waxman, Democrat of California.

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Drugmakers prefer silence on test data
Firms violate U.S. law by not registering trials
By Shankar Vedantam
Updated: 5:21 a.m. ET July 06, 2004 (Source: Msnbc.msn.com)

The pharmaceutical industry has repeatedly violated federal law by failing to disclose the existence of large numbers of its clinical trials to a government database, according to the Food and Drug Administration.

Doctors and patients say that compliance with the law would go a long way toward addressing their growing concerns that they are not being given the full picture about the effectiveness of many drugs because they are not told about drug trials that fail. The issue has gained urgency with recent disclosures that the publicly available research on treating children with antidepressants obscured the fact that in most studies, the drugs were no better than sugar pills. Drugmakers chose not to publish those studies.

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There are better ways to handle diabetes
by Wendy Smith

July 8, 2004 • Vol. 14, No. 28
© 2004 Metro Pulse

This is part two of a New Health discussion of type 2 (adult onset) diabetes:

The goal of nutrients such as herbs, minerals and natural supplements in regard to type 2 diabetes is to regulate the body’s blood control system. Since type 2 diabetes generally causes insensitivity to insulin and thus overproduction of the same, many of these treatments help increase sensitivity to insulin.

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For Release 7/6/2004 Contact: Bill Sardi 909 596-9507

LINUS PAULING VINDICATED; RESEARCHERS CLAIM RDA FOR VITAMIN C IS FLAWED
Source: Ask Bill Sardi

Manchester, England- The authors of a new book claim the Institute of Medicine (IM) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) used flawed science to develop the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for vitamin C, a blunder that has likely caused millions of people to prematurely suffer avoidable health problems such as cataracts, strokes, heart attacks and many other maladies.

Steve Hickey PhD and Hillary Roberts PhD, pharmacology professors and graduates of the University of Manchester in Britain, claim they have been in communication with the NIH and the IM for over a year, challenging their rationale which establishes the RDA for vitamin C at 75 and 90 milligrams for males and females respectively. Hickey and Roberts say some basic errors in biology make justification for the current RDA for vitamin C indefensible. Even a recently proposed 200- milligram daily intake would still be inadequate to achieve optimal health says Hickey and Roberts.

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Switzerland Starts 'Vitamin Initiative'

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A Swiss pro-health association - ProGesundheitSchweiz - has started an initiative to collect signatures for a citizens' legislative proposal to promote free access to food supplements. The signature-collection has taken off officially on 27 April 2004 and will run for 18 months. The aim is to collect at least 100,000 signatures of Swiss citizens within that time and if successful, the Swiss parliament will have to deal with the issue and put the proposal - possibly with a parliamentary counter-proposal - up for the Swiss to vote on in a direct vote referendum.

In Switzerland, food supplements are very much restricted in dosage, as in some other countries of Europe. Although the European Union has passed a directive that may eventually allow higher dose supplements on the market, Switzerland is not affected as it is not a European Union member. That is the reason for a separate initiative, which asks for a constitutional amendment to allow free commerce of health supplements, even if they exceed RDA dosages.

The proposed constitutional amendment is an article that would allow food supplements containing vitamins, minerals, aminoacids and other nutritional ingredients to be freely produced, promoted and sold in the Alpine nation.

2008: Unfortunally the Information in German, French and Italian, can't be found anymore.

E-mail enquiries: fredy.henrich@bluewin.ch

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Adverse drug reactions cause too many hospital admissions
BMJ  2004;329 (3 July), doi:10.1136/bmj.329.7456.0
Source: British Medical Journal

One in 16 admissions to hospital is due to adverse drug reactions. Analysing 18 820 admissions to hospital in Merseyside, Pirmohamed and colleagues (p 15) found that 1225 admissions (6.5%) were related to adverse drug reactions. Patients were in hospital for eight days on average, accounting for 4% of bed capacity, and 28 (0.15%) died. Most reactions were due to aspirin, diuretics, warfarin, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; the most common reaction was gastrointestinal bleeding. Adverse drug reactions are likely to cost the NHS £466m every year, say the authors, and most are avoidable.

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Hospital infections in the USA, how to reduce them
05 Jul 2004
Souce: Medical News Today

In the last 20 years, hospital infections have increased nearly 40 percent in the USA. Nearly 100,000 people die from these infections every year, which is more than those who die from breast cancer, prostate cancer and skin cancer, combined.

Each year, about 2 million Americans develop a potentially fatal infection during a hospital stay. Many of those infections are developing a strong resistance to the antibiotics used to treat them, leaving few effective therapies. Now two new therapies are packing a powerful punch against these infections.

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Just let me get my teeth into those fluoride fans

Carmen Reid
Sun 4 Jul 2004
Source; Scotland on Sunday

APOLOGIES for being so Texan, but the word ‘fluoride’ makes me want to reach for my metaphorical gun.

Call me a Luddite, but the idea of taking a relatively pure, essential resource - water - and then pumping it full of a waste product from the aluminium industry - fluoride - in the name of dental health, it just doesn’t sit well with me. Or lots of other people, which is why the Scottish Executive has decided it won’t be making the decision to mass ‘medicate’ us - it will hand this over to our health boards: those unelected bodies so well known for passing unpopular hospital closure decisions in the face of mass opposition.

There are too many doubts about fluoride. It’s carcinogenic - in what doses, we’re not too sure. It’s certainly linked to brittle bones. People in fluoridated areas have less fillings, but in later life, more broken bones and hip fractures. And then there’s fluoridisis. The mottling, caused by over-exposure to fluoride, which spoils teeth for life.

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ADRs account for 6% of hospital admissions
NT Online News
02 07 2004
Source: The Nursing Time

Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) account for 1 in 16 hospital admissions and cost the NHS £466m a year, according to new research.
A study published today by the British Medical Journal assessed 18,820 patients aged over 16 years who were admitted to two NHS hospitals in Merseyside over a six-month period.


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