Journals, authors cited for conflicts of interest
By Robert Davis, USA TODAY
Posted 7/12/2004

Some leading scientific and medical journals do not always enforce their conflict of interest policies with the authors of published studies, according to a new report.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest found that in some cases the journals did not disclose contributing authors' financial conflicts of interest even though the journals' own rules require such disclosures.

"There is a consistent pattern here," says Merrill Goozner, CSPI project director. "This is an unacceptable level, and the journals need to take action."

The findings come amid growing concern over the influence that private industry has on scientific research. For example, journal editors, including those responsible for some of the content that was studied by CSPI, are considering requiring drug companies to register all clinical trials in a database for more accountability.

The study examined 163 articles in The New England Journal of Medicine, TheJournal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Environmental Health Perspectives, and Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology and found that the authors of 13 articles had relevant conflicts of interest that were not reported to readers.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Bias alleged in cholesterol guidelines
Doctors got money from drug companies
07/07/2004
Source: The Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. - Most of the heart-disease experts who this week urged more people to take cholesterol-lowering drugs have made money from the companies that sell those medicines.

Consumer groups on Friday blasted the new cholesterol guidelines as being tainted by the influence of major pharmaceutical companies that make blockbusters such as Lipitor and Pravachol.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Cannabis extract reduces pain in multiple sclerosis patients
16 Jul 2004
Source: Medical News Today

The cannabis extract, dronabinol, reduces pain in patients with multiple sclerosis, finds new research published on www.bmj.com today.

The study involved 24 patients with multiple sclerosis and central pain attending a hospital clinic in Denmark.

Patients were given either dronabinol capsules or identical looking placebo capsules for three weeks. Pain intensity in the last week of treatment was assessed and patients completed a quality of life questionnaire.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Cholesterol panel has drugmaker ties
Provided by United Press International on 7/15/2004
Source: Healthy News

NEW YORK, Jul 15, 2004 (United Press International via COMTEX) -- A government panel's guidelines urging the use of statins to lower cholesterol in certain cases neglected to mention the panel's link with the drug.

Aggressive statin medications were recommended for people at high risk of a heart attack.

Not mentioned, however, Newsday said, was that six of the nine panelists had received grants or fees from companies that produce some of the most popular statins on the market.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

Food, Not Fluoride, Reduces Cavities
From New York State Coalition Opposed to Fluoridation
Tuesday, February 03, 2004
Source: ENN - Enviromental News Network

New York - February 2004 - Cavities occur in sixty-percent of U.S. preschool children, and more often in the poorly nourished, according to the January 2004 Journal of the American Dental Association(1). Federal statistics indicate poor health is closely associated to bad teeth regardless of fluoridation levels.

About 2/3 of Americans drink fluoridated water. But those skipping breakfast and fruits and vegetables still have more cavities, according to researchers, Dye et al.

Sixty percent of Northern Ireland prechoolers have tooth decay also and they aren't served fluoridated water.(1a) Food, not fluoride, reduces cavities.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (2 votes cast)

Aspirin Not Good for People with Heart Failure
Wednesday, July 7, 2004
Source: Reuters Health
By Will Boggs, MD

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People with heart failure are often put on blood-thinning regimens with aspirin or sometimes Coumadin (warfarin), but a new study indicates that this is not helpful and could even be harmful.

Heart failure patients have an increased risk for thrombosis-related events like stroke or heart attacks, but as the authors of the study point out in the American Heart Journal, "Just because patients are at increased risk of events does not mean that antithrombotic therapy is safe or effective."


  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Antioxidant Found in Broccoli and Broccoli Sprouts Protects Eyes From Light Damage
Source: NpiCenter.com
Discovery May Lead to Dietary Strategies for Preventing Macular Degeneration

BALTIMORE, Jul 13, 2004 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- Carrots may be the first vegetable that comes to mind when people think of protecting their eyesight, but a new study shows broccoli and broccoli sprouts should be added to the list. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that sulforaphane, the naturally-occurring antioxidant in broccoli and broccoli sprouts, protects the eye from damage caused by UV light which can lead to macular degeneration. The study is published in the July 13, 2004 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

FDA: Glaxo Vaccine Information Wrong
Tue Jul 13, 2004 01:39 PM ET
Source: Reuters.com

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Product materials for several GlaxoSmithKline Plc hepatitis vaccines contain false information about flu vaccines that could lead to public health problems, U.S. regulators said in a letter released on Tuesday.

Hepatitis vaccines Havrix, Twinrix and Engerix-B all included the company's version of general U.S. government vaccine guidelines but listed false flu vaccine recommendations, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration wrote.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

Dietary niacin (vitamin B3) may protect against Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline
15 Jul 2004
Source: Medical News Today

Dietary niacin (vitamin B3 ) may protect against the development of Alzheimer's disease and the cognitive decline associated with ageing in older people, suggests research in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry.

Rich sources of niacin include lean meat, fish, legumes, nuts, dairy products, enriched grains and cereals, and coffee and tea.

[Dietary niacin and the risk of incident Alzheimer's disease and of cognitive decline J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2004; 75: 1093-99]

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Health Canada fires whistle-blowing scientists
Three criticized department drug-approval process
Jul. 14, 2004. 07:00 PM
Source: TheStar.com

OTTAWA (CP) — Health Canada has fired three scientists who repeatedly criticized the department's drug-approval policies, and who claimed they were being pressured to approve unsafe veterinary drugs.

Chiv Chopra, Margaret Haydon and Gerard Lambert, probably the country's best-known whistle-blowers, received letters of termination today, said Steve Hindle, president of the Professional Institute of the Public Service.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Health Supreme News

Loading...
Powered by Movable Type 5.13-en

Receive updates

Subscribe to get updates of this site by email:

Enter your Email


Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz

Recent Comments

Other sites of ours