Ascorbic Acid in the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer
by Kathleen A. Head, N.D.
Source: Vitamin C & Cancer, by the way of Chris Gupta

Abstract

Proposed mechanisms of action for ascorbic acid (ascorbate, vitamin C) in the prevention and treatment of cancer include enhancement of the immune system, stimulation of collagen formation necessary for "walling off" tumors, inhibition of hyaluronidase which keeps the ground substance around the tumor intact and prevents metastasis, prevention of oncogenic viruses, correction of an ascorbate deficiency often seen in cancer patients, expedition of wound healing after cancer surgery, enhancement of the effect of certain chemotherapy drugs, reduction of the toxicity of other chemotherapeutic agents such as Adriamycin, prevention of free radical damage, and neutralization of carcinogenic substances. Scottish as well as Japanese studies have pointed to the potential benefit of high dose vitamin C for the treatment of "terminal" cancer. Mayo Clinic studies, however, have contradicted the Scottish and Japanese findings, resulting in accusations of methodological flaws from both sides. Numerous epidemiological studies have pointed to the importance of dietary and supplemental ascorbate in the prevention of various types of cancer including bladder, breast, cervical, colorectal, esophageal, lung, pancreatic, prostate, salivary gland, stomach, leukemia, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (Altern Med Rev 1998;3(3):174-186)

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Aloe May Save Lives on Battlefield, Study Finds
Mon Jul 26, 2004 03:11 PM ET
Source: Reuters.com

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The aloe vera plant could provide a fluid to help keep alive trauma victims such as battlefield casualties until they can get a blood transfusion, U.S. researchers said on Monday.

Tests on rats show that the sticky fluid found inside the leaves of aloe vera can help preserve organ function after massive blood loss, the team at the University of Pittsburgh said.

Writing in the journal Shock, they said just small injections of the substance helped counteract the more immediate deadly effects of blood loss.

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Fla. Fails to Renew Drug Company Program
THERESA AGOVINO
Posted on Mon, Jul. 26, 2004
Associated Press
Source: The Mercury News


NEW YORK - Highly touted programs sponsored by drug companies in Florida to illustrate the role medicines can play in controlling health care costs failed to save the state enough money to warrant their renewal.

Facing soaring drug costs, Florida began demanding rebates from pharmaceutical companies in 2001 to have their medicines included on the preferred list for the state's Medicaid population.

Pfizer Inc. struck a deal that allowed it to fund disease management programs instead of paying rebates. The theory was that if patients took the appropriate medicines and learned how to take care of their conditions they would have fewer expensive emergency room visits and hospital stays. Hailed as a major innovation, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co, AstraZeneca PLC and GlaxoSmithKline PLC quickly followed with similar, smaller programs.

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How Tightly Do Ties Between Doctor and Drug Company Bind?
By ABIGAIL ZUGER, M.D.
Published: July 27, 2004
Source: New York Times

My patient scanned the prescription I had handed her, then idly glanced at the elegant ballpoint pen I had used to sign it. The same drug brand name appeared on both.

She said nothing, but I knew just what she was thinking.

I had the same thoughts a few months before, listening to a researcher at a medical conference present the results of a new treatment combination for hepatitis C. The data were unambiguous: The drugs were mediocre at best. Still, the researcher methodically minimized the drugs' problems and urged us all to begin prescribing them.

"I wonder whose pocket he's in," I muttered to myself.

Earlier this month, consumer groups raised exactly the same issue when they questioned a federal panel's recommendation that Americans at risk for heart disease sharply lower their cholesterol levels. Most of the panel members had financial ties to pharmaceutical companies that make statins, powerful cholesterol-lowering drugs whose use will soar with the new guidelines. Were the panelist's recommendations truly impartial, or was their integrity suspect? The consumer groups also criticized the press, including this newspaper, for not explicitly addressing the financial links. However, resolving these apparent conflicts of interest is far from easy. It is becoming one of the biggest medical challenges of the 21st century. Sometimes drug company ties taint a doctor's or researcher's judgment. Often though, they do not. How is it all to be sorted out?

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Brassica vegetables kill colon cancer cells in similar way to some cancer drugs
26 Jul 2004
Source: Medical News Today

When you prepare some vegetables plant chemicals are created which could destroy cancer cells the same way some cancer drugs do. The chemical is called allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC).

AITC undermines the cell division of colon cancer cells.

Cancer cells, unlike normal cells, do not shut down and kill themselves. They go on indefinitely and carry on dividing. A normal cell destroys itself and a new one is created.

When some vegetables, brassica vegetables, are chopped, chewed, cooked, processed and digested they create AITC. AITC is the result of the breakdown of a chemical compound called Sinigrin. Sinigrin is found in mustard, cabbage, horseradish, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, swede, kale and wasabi.

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CHILD WELFARE: Maker of drug admits hiding its risks Provided by Miami Herald
by CAROL MARBIN MILLER
7/24/2004
Source: Healthy News

The maker of a billion-dollar antipsychotic medication has acknowledged misleading doctors and other healthcare providers about the safety of its product, minimizing potentially deadly side effects.

The drug, Risperdal, has been commonly prescribed to Florida children in state care, including to a handful of boys who developed lactating breasts after taking it.

On Wednesday, drug maker Janssen Pharmaceutica wrote a two-page letter to doctors, warning them that the company, in promotional material, had "minimized potentially fatal risks, and made misleading claims" that the medication was more safe in treating mental illness than other drugs in the same category.

Most physicians received the letter Friday.

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Summary of Teflon-Related TSCA 8(e) Action Against DuPont

EPA finds DuPont guilty of withholding Teflon blood and water pollution studies
Company faces fines of up to $313 million
Source: Enviromental Working Group

JULY 15, 2004 — In an extraordinary announcement on July 8, 2004, the Environmental Protection Agency revealed the results of a year-long investigation into DuPont's failure to disclose to the agency internal company studies showing pollution of human fetal cord blood and local tap water with a toxic Teflon ingredient, known as C8 or PFOA. Acting on a petition filed by the Environmental Working Group, the Agency found that DuPont engaged in unlawful behavior on three separate counts of hiding critical study results in company file cabinets for up to 20 years.

QUICK LINKS
- EPA findings against DuPont
- The law that DuPont violated: TSCA 8(e)

EPA's legal action is all the more extraordinary when the scathing, no-holds-barred language of the agency's complaint is contrasted with the unwillingness of politically appointed agency higher-ups to announce a potential fine amount against the company. The amount, apparently, will be calculated at a later date, after the Agency begins "negotiations" with the company to determine the outlines of a possible out of court settlement.

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Let sun shine on clinical results
The push is on for more transparency in the clinical trial process. A comprehensive registry could help achieve it.
Editorial. July 26, 2004.
Source: amednews.com

Shock waves rumbled through the medical community in February when the Food and Drug Administration convened a hearing to investigate the possibility that certain antidepressants did not help young patients and, in some cases, actually might have increased their risk of suicidal behavior. The previously unavailable clinical trial data that surfaced because of these deliberations changed the understanding of how the medications should be used -- especially among young patients.

It also was part of a series of events, including the agency's initial June 2003 caution regarding the antidepressant paroxetine and second expanded advisory issued in March, that highlighted the life-and-death nature of making clinical trial results more accessible. The unfolding story since has become a rallying cry for efforts to open up the clinical trial process.

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Chromium supplementation may improve glucose and insuling metabolism
23 Jul 2004
Source: Medical News Today

Richard A Anderson, PhD, a US Department of Agriculture nutrition research scientist presented clinical findings about the role of chromium supplementation in maintaining metabolic health and improving insulin resistance at the American Diabetes Association 64th Scientific Session symposia "Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Diabetes."

Anderson provided evidence showing that chromium supplementation may lead to improvements in glucose and insulin metabolism in people with glucose intolerance, depression, and gestational and type 2 diabetes.

In association with the improvements in insulin function, supplemental chromium also improves blood lipids and decreases the risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases.

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Deaths from Asbestos Exposure Surge in U.S. - Report
July 22, 2004
By Paul Simao
Source: Reuters.com

ATLANTA (Reuters) - Deaths from asbestos exposure have surged in the United States and are set to keep rising in the next decade as more workers succumb to the lung disease caused by the industrial mineral, federal health experts warned on Thursday.

The number of Americans who died of asbestosis, which is caused by inhalation of asbestos particles, jumped to 1,493 in 2000 from 77 in 1968, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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