Haunted By AIDS Misdiagnosis
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 30, 2004
Source: Cbs News

Malone, who is gay and has lost friends to AIDS, said he is relieved but angry at his doctor.

(AP) A California man who once tested positive for the virus that causes AIDS has learned the diagnosis made eight years ago was mistaken and he was never infected.

Jim Malone spent years battling depression and losing weight, expecting to die at any time. He attended support group meetings and accepted free meals from an AIDS charity.

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The "Teflon* Tactic": Deny, Deny, Deny

Source: http://www.uwsp.edu/geo/courses/geog100/Plastics-DenyDamage.htm

*Trademark for polytetrafluoroethylene, a substance used to provide a nonsticking coating on some cookware and industrial products

To keep their profitable chemicals on the market, corporations commonly deny, and deny time and again, that their products cause any harm.  With this Teflon™ tactic companies attempt to escape blame by metaphorically coating their "chemical-X" with a non-sticking shield to repel censure. 

This approach has been practiced not only by chemical companies, but also by tobacco companies, asbestos companies, drug companies, nuclear power companies and many other industries.

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American parents sue GSK over Seroxat
Heather Tomlinson
Monday September 6, 2004
Source: The Guardian

A lawsuit has been filed against GlaxoSmithKline in the United States seeking refunds for children and adolescents given the antidepressant, Seroxat, following claims that the firm suppressed data showing the drug did not work and increased suicidal tendencies in young people.

The class action suit follows an inquiry by New York state attorney general Eliot Spitzer that made similar accusations.

Last month GSK settled with Mr Spitzer for $2.5m (£1.4m), without admitting liability.

The amount surprised the industry because Mr Spitzer had originally said he wanted to recover all the money GSK had made from selling Seroxat - named Paxil in the US - which analysts have estimated at about £200m.

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Attorney for family of drug trial suicide victim questions FDA probe
Sep. 04, 2004
Associated Press
Source: CentreDaily.com

INDIANAPOLIS - An attorney for the parents of a woman who committed suicide during a clinical trial of a new Eli Lilly and Co. antidepressant is questioning whether her death was thoroughly investigated before the drug was approved for sale.

According to Lilly, the Food and Drug Administration concluded last month that 19-year-old Traci Johnson's death wasn't caused by duloxetine, the antidepressant she was testing as part of a Lilly clinical trial.

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Fluoride: the pros, the cons, the court
By ROGER TALBOT
Sunday News Staff
Source: The Union Leader and New Hampshire Sunday News

With a Washington-based scientist visiting Manchester and the possibility of an appearance by a former surgeon general, the debate on water fluoridation could come to a boil this week as voters weigh their options and a judge hears a lawsuit that could affect a referendum scheduled for Sept. 14.

The government scientist is John William Hirzy, a chemist who works for the Environmental Protection Agency and is an outspoken opponent of fluoridation. The former surgeon general is C. Everett Koop, who has long been a proponent of adding fluoride to drinking water to reduce tooth decay.

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Researcher says symptoms of mercury contamination rising in some Ont. natives
Source: Canada.com

WINNIPEG (CP) - A renowned Japanese neurologist who sounded the alarm decades ago about mercury poisoning in residents of two northern Ontario aboriginal bands says some people there are experiencing an increase in symptoms even though the chemical's level is dropping in their bodies.

Dr. Masazumi Harada visited Grassy Narrows and Wabaseemong reserves over the last week. On Thursday, he said while mercury levels in band members - measured through hair samples - are dropping, some residents' symptoms from long-term exposure, such are impaired motor skills and fatigue, are increasing.

Harada's findings prompted the reserves' leaders to call on the federal and Ontario governments to launch a public inquiry.

"It should not be the Canadian way to permit this . . . . to linger any longer," Grassy Narrows chief Simon Fobister told reporters.

"If this was a Walkerton . . . . governments would have acted much more swiftly and decisively," Fobister said.

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Mercury symptoms rising in natives, doctor says
Friday, September 3, 2004 - Page A5
Source: The Globe and Mail

Winnipeg -- A renowned Japanese neurologist who sounded the alarm decades ago about mercury poisoning in residents of two Northern Ontario aboriginal bands says some people there are experiencing an increase in symptoms, even though the level in their bodies is dropping.

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Harvard Health Letter Unravels New Cholesterol Guidelines
Thursday September 2, 4:28 pm ET
Source: Yahoo News

Press Release
Source: Harvard Health Publications

BOSTON, Sept. 2 /PRNewswire/ -- A federal panel of experts (8 of 9 paid by the Pharmaceuticals, statins producers - Editor's note) released cholesterol guidelines revisions in July. The overall message on "bad" LDL cholesterol is that lower is better and how low depends on your cardiovascular risk factors. The September issue of the Harvard Health Letter unravels the new guidelines and provides answers to the LDL-level discussion.

Currently, the average American LDL level is about 130. The new guidelines decrease the thresholds for prescribing cholesterol-lowering medications so that more people may be prescribed statins to meet LDL targets. The Health Letter notes that if recommended target LDL levels continue to decrease, cholesterol-lowering statin drugs will continue to become part of a daily routine for more and more people.

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SSRI Citizen announces antidepressant “Unsafe At Any Dose” national awareness campaign. Dangers of Paxil, Zoloft, Prozac and Effexor are targeted by group.

Source: PRWeb.com

In a bold move reminiscent of Ralph Nader’s 1960’s “Unsafe At Any Speed” campaign a consumer activist group which calls itself “SSRI Citizen” has launched a national awareness campaign designed to educate the general public about the serious health risks associated with the use of popular antidepressants such as Paxil, Zoloft, Effexor and Prozac.

(PRWEB) August 11, 2004 -- In a bold move reminiscent of Ralph Nader’s 1960’s “Unsafe At Any Speed” campaign a consumer activist group which calls itself “SSRI Citizen” has launched a national awareness campaign designed to educate the general public about the serious health risks associated with the use of popular antidepressants such as Paxil, Zoloft, Effexor and Prozac.

The group’s web site (see u) sells bumper stickers emblazoned with drug names followed by the warning ‘Unsafe At Any Dose’. “Our hope is the proliferation of the stickers will help raise public awareness of the dangers these drugs present and encourage people to visit our web site where they will discover drug safety information and other resources which heretofore have not been readily available to the consumer,” said Rob Robinson, the organization’s founder and spokesperson.

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Fluoride is added to Escondido water amid complaints
By Craig Gustafson
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER
August 31, 2004
Source: SignOnSanDiego.com

ESCONDIDO – The city began adding fluoride to its water supply yesterday, and officials reported more than two dozen complaints since they announced their plans Thursday.

Meanwhile, two City Council members who oppose the plan said they would like to see the city track the much-publicized benefits of fluoride.

Workers at the city's water treatment plant began the process at noon, with nearby homes and businesses receiving fluoride-treated water shortly thereafter. It will take about 24 hours for the fluoridated water to flow through the entire system, which reaches about 75 percent of the city's 140,000 residents.

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