Pesticides May Be Linked to Rising Child Leukaemia
By Lyndsay Moss and Jennifer Sym, PA News
September 6, 2004
Source: Scotsman.com

Pesticides and other environmental pollution may affect unborn children – and play a role in the rising rates of childhood leukaemia, new research suggested today.

A study, unveiled at the First International Scientific conference on Childhood Leukaemia in London, indicated harmful environmental agents can cross the placenta from mother to foetus.

The study suggests the transfer could affect the immune system of the child, which could be linked to the increasing incidence of the disease.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Fish on Prozac

By Jeff Dankert | Winona Daily News

LANESBORO, Minn. — Potential for human drugs polluting waterways and short circuiting aquatic biochemistry will be the topic of a speech Saturday night in Lanesboro.

Ira Adelman will present a lecture at Eagle Bluff Environmnetal Learning Center titled "Hormones in our water, fish on Prozac." Adelman is a University of Minnesota fisheries biology professor.

The topic may sound like comedy over dinner, but reflects a growing concern about trace chemicals from drugs and other medical compounds creating havoc with aquatic ecosystem functioning.

Prozac is an antidepressant drug manufactured by Eli Lilly Co.

  • Currently 4/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 4/5 (2 votes cast)

Indicting the Drug Industry's Practices
Posted on September 06, 2004
By JANET MASLIN
New York Times
Source: GoUpstate.com

Dr. Marcia Angell is a former editor in chief of The New England Journal of Medicine and spent two decades on the staff of that publication. If much of that time was devoted to reviewing papers on pharmacological research, it must have been spent in a state of near-apoplexy.

Her new book is a scorching indictment of drug companies and their research and business practices. "Despite all its excesses, this is an important industry that should be saved - mainly from itself," she writes.

This turns out to be one of her book's more forgiving pronouncements, since the rest of it is devoted to assertions of shady, misleading corporate behavior. If she is accurate in her assumptions about big drug companies' feistiness and tenacity, Dr. Angell is likely to be on the receiving end of angry rebuttals. She is sometimes vague enough to leave room for such attacks. ("I have heard that morale in some parts of the F.D.A. is extremely low, and I can certainly understand why it might be.")

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

Use of antidepressants by children debated after doctor's shooting

06:18 PM CDT on Monday, September 6, 2004

Source: Associated Press by kvue.com

HOUSTON — The case of a 10-year-old Houston-area boy accused of killing his father is fueling concern about children's use of antidepressants.

The boy's mother, Deborah Geisler, says a psychiatrist prescribed Prozac for her son in early August after he was diagnosed with depression and anxiety.

  • Currently 1/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 1/5 (1 votes cast)

GSK face more legal action over antidepressant drug
Source: Drug Research

06/09/2004 - GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) is facing a number of US lawsuits, which claims the company had covered up negative data that indicated its antidepressant Paxil might increase suicidal tendencies in young people.

The action, instigated by the families of children and teenagers who were prescribed Paxil, known as Seroxat in the UK and Europe, comes after a legal confrontation with New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, who last month sued the firm over the disclosure of research suggesting problems with the drug in children.

  • Currently 3/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 3/5 (1 votes cast)

Women can reduce colon cancer risk if vitamin D blood levels are high
06 Sep 2004
Source: Medical News

Dr. Diane Feskanich of Harvard University reported women can significantly reduce their risk of colon cancer by maintaining high vitamin D blood levels. Women over the age of 60 with the highest vitamin D blood levels had 1/2 the chance of developing cancer of the distal colon and rectum compared to women with the lowest levels.

PMID: 15342452 [PubMed - in process]

Plasma vitamin d metabolites and risk of colorectal cancer in women.

Feskanich D, Ma J, Fuchs CS, Kirkner GJ, Hankinson SE, Hollis BW, Giovannucci EL.

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. diane.feskanich@channing.harvard.edu

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Unnecessary CT scans
Advertising come-ons don't mention the risks.
September 04, 2004
Source: Press Telegram

Here's a suggestion that could save you $800 to $1,500: If you've been planning to treat yourself to a full-body CT scan for your health's sake, don't. For your health's sake.

You've probably read the advertising come-ons about how CT scans can spot diseases before they are otherwise detectable. And maybe you've heard a friend's tale of relief, having had a "clean" scan, or concern, having had a less happy finding. Either had a high probability of being useless.

But not cheap, especially since health insurance plans don't cover elective CT (which stands for computerized tomography). And, it turns out, for good reason. Except in limited circumstances, they can cause more problems than they solve.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Beriberi Seen After Teen Gastric Bypass
Fri Sep 3, 1:39 PM ET

Source: Yahoo News

By Megan Rauscher

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The nutritional disorder, beriberi -- caused by lack of vitamin B1 in the diet -- can appear in teens who have undergone gastric bypass surgery for severe obesity.

Dr. Thomas H. Inge from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and colleagues report three such cases in the Journal of Pediatrics.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (2 votes cast)

Pollution triggers bizarre behaviour in animals
03 September 04
Source: New Scientist

 Hyperactive fish, stupid frogs, fearless mice and seagulls that fall over. It sounds like a weird animal circus, but this is no freak show. Animals around the world are increasingly behaving in bizarre ways, and the cause is environmental pollution.

The chemicals to blame are known as endocrine disruptors, and range from heavy metals such as lead to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and additives such as bisphenol A.

For decades, biologists have known that these chemicals can alter the behaviour of wild animals. And in recent years it has become clear that pollutants can cause gender-bending effects by altering animals' physiology, particularly their sexual organs.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Study says omega-3 acid blocks Alzheimer's
CP  
2004-09-06 03:39:28  
Source: London Free Press

TORONTO -- A new Canadian study suggests a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish such as salmon and sardines, and in fish-oil capsules, can help keep Alzheimer's disease at bay. The research, on mice, provides the strongest evidence so far that a deficiency in a specific dietary component can have a direct impact on a person's risk of developing the devastating neurological disease.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Health Supreme News

Loading...
Powered by Movable Type 5.13-en

Receive updates

Subscribe to get updates of this site by email:

Enter your Email


Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz

Recent Comments

Other sites of ours