Study finds Vioxx took deadly toll

|

By Carolyn Abraham
From Tuesday's Globe and Mail

Vioxx, the blockbuster arthritis and pain medication pulled off the market last September, could have killed more than 40,000 people in the United States, according to an FDA scientist who has said his employer silenced his earlier warnings about the drug's safety.

David Graham, associate director of science for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Office of Drug Safety and lead author of a study published on-line by The Lancet yesterday, found that Vioxx raised a person's risk of coronary heart disease by 34 per cent, compared with other anti-inflammatory drugs, including Celebrex, its onetime rival in the class of drugs known as cox-2 inhibitors.

(Celebrex has also been linked to heart attacks at high doses).

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Arthritis drug linked to heart problems

|

Story from BBC NEWS:
Published: 2005/01/25 01:41:24 GMT

An arthritis drug removed over safety concerns last year could have been linked to thousands of heart problems, and even deaths, researchers estimate.

The Food and Drug Administration study in the Lancet said Vioxx could have caused up to 140,000 cases of coronary heart disease in the US since 1999.

Vioxx was prescribed to 106.7m patients in the US and 400,000 in the UK.

Merck, the firm which makes Vioxx, said it was withdrawn as soon as research confirmed a risk of heart problems.

However, the UK's Arthritis Research Campaign called the latest Lancet study results "shocking".

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

The Independent
By Steve Connor, Science Editor
22 January 2005

Senior scientific advisers to the World Health Organisation (WHO) have recommended the creation of a genetically modified version of the smallpox virus to counter any threat of a bioterrorist attack.

Permitting researchers to engineer the genes of one of the most dangerous infections known to man would make it easier to develop new drugs against smallpox, the scientists said. But the man who led the successful global vaccination campaign to eradicate smallpox from the wild said he opposed the move on the grounds that the scientific benefits were not worth the risks to public health.

Professor Donald Henderson, of the Centre for Biosecurity at the University of Pittsburgh, said he feared that tinkering with the genetic makeup of the variola virus - which causes smallpox - might accidentally produce a more lethal form of the disease.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

Monsanto fined for bribery

|

BBC NEWS:
Published: 2005/01/07 06:22:58 GMT

The US agrochemical giant Monsanto has agreed to pay a $1.5m (£799,000) fine for bribing an Indonesian official.

Monsanto admitted one of its employees paid the senior official two years ago in a bid to avoid environmental impact studies being conducted on its cotton.

In addition to the penalty, Monsanto also agreed to three years' close monitoring of its business practices by the American authorities.

It said it accepted full responsibility for what it called improper activities.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

Doors are closing on GMO's

|

Canadian Press
January 23, 2005

CHARLOTTETOWN (CP) -- Hearings on whether Prince Edward Island should ban the use of genetically modified organisms in its agriculture industry has international experts on both sides of the debate digging in for a fight.

Requests to participate are coming in from as far away as California, mainly from the well-organized anti-GMO lobby, which regards genetically engineered food and crops as "Frankenfood.''

Nadege Adam, a spokeswoman for the Council of Canadians, says the public hearings next month could make the island an international trendsetter.

She says if the island goes ahead with a GMO ban, it will put the province ahead of the pack when it comes to responding to public concerns about genetically altered foods.

"What we have here is a very unpopular product,'' she says.

"Around the world, more and more countries are either closing their doors altogether to GMO foods, or they are putting in strict restrictions. So P.E.I., because it is an island, would have the advantage of being able to provide for this fast-growing niche market.''

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

Vaccines Are Not Mercury Free

|

August 12, 2004
Health Advocacy in the Public Interest (HAPI)

Vaccines Are Not Mercury Free
After much controversy surrounding the mercury content of childhood vaccinations, HAPI raised $500 to have four vaccines tested for heavy metal content at Doctor's Data, an independent lab specializing in heavy metal testing. Many vaccine manufacturers voluntarily began producing supposed "mercury-free" vaccines in 1999. The June, 2004 lab results from Doctor's Data run counter to vaccine manufacturersí claims. For example, some product inserts currently claim that a "trace" amount of mercury still exists in the final product but that the amount has been greatly reduced. Others claim to be producing completely mercury-free products.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

Study Raises Questions on Plavix Safety

|

New York Times
Published: January 20, 2005
By GARDINER HARRIS

Patients taking Plavix, a popular and expensive antistroke drug, experience more than 12 times as many ulcers as patients who take aspirin plus a heartburn pill, a study to be published today in The New England Journal of Medicine found.

Up to half of those now taking Plavix do so because their doctors assume that Plavix is safer on the stomach than aspirin, said Dr. Francis K. L. Chan, the study's lead author. Both the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recommend that heart and stroke patients at risk of developing ulcers be given Plavix instead of aspirin.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Painkillers up heart risk, evidence shows

|

By THE WASHINGTON POST
By Marc Kaufman

WASHINGTON — Two studies released Monday have turned up new evidence that all of the popular arthritis painkillers known as COX-2 inhibitors may put users at greater risk of heart attacks and strokes.

The first of the two papers published online by the journal Circulation found patients who had had heart bypass surgery and were taking Pfizer Inc.’s Bextra, in combination with an experimental medication, were three times more likely to have strokes and heart attacks than patients taking a placebo.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Folic acid 'cuts blood pressure'

|

Pregnant women are advised to take extra folic acid
Folic acid may help keep blood pressure in check, US researchers believe.

The study, in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association, adds to growing evidence of folate's cardiovascular benefits.
The Harvard team looked at data on about 156,000 nurses and found those with the lowest intakes of folate were at greater risk of hypertension.
Last week, researchers said folic acid - found in green leafy vegetables - might benefit people at risk of stroke.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Squeeze Play On Supplements

|

by: Jon Rappoport http://nomorefakenews.com

JANUARY 14, 2004. A new report from a prestigious government-connnected medical institute is calling for tighter regulation of nutritional supplements.

This report is timed to coincide with the final Codex push to place heavy restrictions on what supplements can be traded across national borders.

I'm told that the FDA is working with and watching Codex with great interest, as a possible prelude to trying to lower the boom on supplements sold within the US.

Reading the AP article below, you'll see that several key issues are being folded into the new report and the consequent follow-up from "medical experts": nutritional manufacturers need to step up their quality control procedures (what's actually in the capsule and how much of it is in there---this is a legitimate concern for consumers---although the US regulatory system that could govern this area will go about it in the wrong way); the inherent safety of supplements needs to be investigated in full (this is mostly nonsense because the overwhelming number of supplements are much, much safer than any drugs and have caused very, very, very few, if any, deaths around the world over the last few centuries); the efficacy of supplements in maintaining or restoring health must be tested in the same way that drugs are tested (this is complete crap---efficacy should not be the purview of the government at all, and the cost of studies that could be mandated will drive most supplement companies into bankruptcy); and health claims made by supplement manufacturers should be governed and controlled by the FDA (although some manufacturers make ridiculous health claims, we should err on the side of allowing such claims, since the supplements are inherently safe, and the consumer should be the judge of these claims).

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Health Supreme News

Loading...
Powered by Movable Type 5.13-en

Receive updates

Subscribe to get updates of this site by email:

Enter your Email


Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz

Recent Comments

Other sites of ours