Wed Feb 2, 2005 07:18 PM ET


LONDON (Reuters) - Whether it is herbs, homeopathy or vitamin and mineral supplements, more than a third of cancer patients in Europe use alternative medicine.

Usage varies from less than 15 percent of patients in Greece to nearly three-quarters in Italy, according to the first Europe-wide study of complementary and alternative therapies (CAM) published in the Annals of Oncology on Thursday.

"Irrespective of what health professionals believe about CAM and how dismissive they might be, our findings show that patients are using, and will continue to use CAM," said Dr Alex Molassiotis, of the University of Manchester School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, in England.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Study U.S.: Many Blacks Cite AIDS Conspiracy

|

Prevention Efforts Hurt, Activists Say

By Darryl Fears
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, January 25, 2005; Page A02

More than 20 years after the AIDS epidemic arrived in the United States, a significant proportion of African Americans embrace the theory that government scientists created the disease to control or wipe out their communities, according to a study released today by Rand Corp. and Oregon State University.

That belief markedly hurts efforts to prevent the spread of the disease among black Americans, the study's authors and activists said. African Americans represent 13 percent of the U.S. population, according to Census Bureau figures, yet they account for 50 percent of new HIV infections in the nation, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Nearly half of the 500 African Americans surveyed said that HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is man-made. The study, which was supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, appears in the Feb. 1 edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

More than one-quarter said they believed that AIDS was produced in a government laboratory, and 12 percent believed it was created and spread by the CIA.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Pfizer rises; management defends Celebrex

|

By Val Brickates Kennedy, MarketWatch
Last Update: 6:02 PM ET Feb. 2, 2005  

BOSTON (MarketWatch)-Shares of Pfizer Inc. moved higher Wednesday after senior management defended the company's handling of clinical data for its drug Celebrex.

Shares of Pfizer closed up 0.9 percent at $24.07 on Wednesday.

Pfizer released a statement Tuesday refuting claims by consumer watchdog group Public Citizen that the company delayed reporting negative data about Celebrex to the Food and Drug Administration. The data, compiled in 1999, purportedly showed that Celebrex could cause cardiac problems in certain users.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

The Italian minister of health Girolamo Sirchia, formerly head of the Blood Transfusion Center of Milan's Policlinic, denied having received payments from Immucor, a multinational blood bank technology and diagnostics firm. However documentary evidence obtained by Italian judges Maurizio Romanelli e Eugenio Fusco from Immucor seem to indicate that checks made out to Sirchia were sent to Switzerland and cashed there.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

Fewer Kids Prescribed Drugs for Depression

|

Sharp Decrease Seen After Reports of Risks

By Shankar Vedantam
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, February 2, 2005; Page A08


The number of American children taking antidepressant drugs fell sharply last year, after months of controversy over evidence that the medications increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior among some children.

The steep decline among children is a dramatic reversal of a decade-long trend of soaring prescription rates for drugs such as Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft, and the pattern of the data suggests the numbers could fall even further.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

By ANTHONY CRONIN
Day Staff Writer
Published on 2/1/2005

The nation's largest health maintenance organization said Monday that its pharmacies would no longer dispense the Bextra pharmaceutical made by Pfizer Inc. because of concerns over the arthritis drug's overall safety.

Kaiser Permanente, the Oakland, Calif.-based not-for-profit HMO, said it was concerned about the cardiovascular risks associated with Bextra, which is a COX-2 inhibitor drug that is used to treat acute pain and inflammation, such as that suffered by those with arthritis-related conditions.

Beverly Hayon, a spokeswoman for Kaiser Permanente, said the company's pharmacies would not dispense the drug until the managed-care provider feels more comfortable with the drug's safety record concerning heart attacks and strokes. She said the decision affects Kaiser Permanente's pharmacies and does not affect its HMO coverage. “If Bextra is absolutely necessary for a patient, it won't be denied,” she said.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

1999 Trials Revealed Risks With Celebrex

|

New York Times
Published: February 1, 2005
By ALEX BERENSON and GARDINER HARRIS

Celebrex, the popular arthritis and pain medicine from Pfizer, sustained another blow yesterday when the company acknowledged that a 1999 clinical trial found that elderly patients taking the drug were far more likely to suffer heart problems than patients taking a placebo.

The company sought to play down the trial's significance yesterday, saying that it was flawed. But the disclosure of the study contradicts earlier public statements by Pfizer, the world's largest drug maker, about the safety of Celebrex. Concerns about the risks of Celebrex have risen since last fall, when Merck withdrew a similar drug, Vioxx, after a trial linked it to heart attacks.

Responding to the Vioxx withdrawal, Pfizer said in October that no completed study had ever shown any increased heart risks related to Celebrex. Then, in December, when a colon cancer prevention study by the company indicated that Celebrex was associated with heart attacks and strokes, Pfizer said the results were unexpected.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Painkiller withdrawn over suicide risk

|

The Guardian co uk
Staff and agencies
Monday January 31, 2005

A widely used painkiller is to be phased out in the UK because of its links to around 400 accidental and intentional fatal overdoses per year, the government's medicines watchdog is expected to announce tomorrow.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will announce the phasing out of the drug, co-proxamol, over 18 months, starting almost immediately. Letters will be sent to GPs informing them of the decision.

A Department of Health spokeswoman said the decision had been taken because of health professionals' concerns that the strength of the drug posed a "small, but fatal risk of people accidentally or intentionally overdosing on it".

The drug, used to treat a range of conditions including back pain and arthritis, is linked to around 400 of these deaths every year.

Measures have already been taken to address concerns about the medicine including making advice more prominent on the packaging, but they did not seem to affect the number of deaths, the spokeswoman said.

Last year, the MHRA held a public consultation looking for further evidence about the risks and benefits of the medicine but it came to the decision to withdraw co-proxamol.

A spokeswoman for the agency said that people who are taking the drug did not need to come off it immediately. She added: "At their next routine appointment with their GP they need to go along and talk about alternative treatment."

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Edited by Iman Khaduri,
http://abutamam.blogspot.com
http://globalresearch.ca/articles/KHA501A.html

For the record: "U.S. declares Iraqis can not save their own seeds"

"As part of sweeping "economic restructuring" implemented by the Bush Administration in Iraq, Iraqi farmers will no longer be permitted to save their seeds, which include seeds the Iraqis themselves have developed over hundreds of years. Instead, they will be forced to buy seeds from US corporations. That is because in recent years, transnational corporations have patented and now own many seed varieties originated or developed by indigenous peoples. In a short time, Iraq will be living under the new American credo: Pay Monsanto, or starve ."

  • Currently 1/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 1/5 (1 votes cast)

Researchers Seek Plastics From Fruit

|

ABC News Original Report
By Paul Eng

Natural Chemicals May Yeild Earth-Friendly Polymers

Jan. 25, 2005 — Think of "plastic" and "fruit" and what pops into mind is probably an eye-catching bowl of artificial produce. But one day, the ties between the two may be a lot closer than just an artistic display of phony fruit.

Researchers at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., have stumbled upon a novel discovery: Citrus fruits, such as oranges and lemons, could become a key building block to environmentally friendly plastics and polymers.

"Basically, all polymers that you come into contact with today are amazing materials," said chemistry professor Geoffrey Coates, leader of the Cornell research team. But "one of the concerns is that they are all made from oil. And most producers are using oil up faster than they're finding it."

So for the past seven years, Coates and graduate students Chris Byrne and Scott Allen have been concentrating on producing plastics from more sustainable, or renewable, sources. And the fruits of their work were published in a recent edition of the Journal of American Chemical Society.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Health Supreme News

Loading...
Powered by Movable Type 5.13-en

Receive updates

Subscribe to get updates of this site by email:

Enter your Email


Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz

Recent Comments

Other sites of ours