The German cancer researcher and medical doctor Ryke Geerd Hamer, has been persecuted for his views that cancer is a natural process in the body, a program which gets triggered by an overwhelming and not consciously understood emotional shock experience. Hamer was arrested in Spain some time ago and extradited to France, where he had been sentenced in absentia to three years in prison.

Languishing in a French prison for several months now, Hamer has apparently been told of his imminent release. The information from a Hamer support group Amici di Dirk, has been forwarded by Emma Holister, an artist and health freedom activist living in France.

Read here what Hamer says:

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Reuters
Wed Mar 16, 2005 08:02 PM ET
By Jim Forsyth

SAN ANTONIO, Texas (Reuters) - Mercury released primarily from coal-fired power plants may be contributing to an increase in the number of cases of autism, a Texas researcher said on Wednesday.

A study to be published on Thursday in the journal "Health and Place" found that autism, a developmental disorder marked by communication and social interaction problems, increased in Texas counties as mercury emissions rose, said Claudia Miller, a family and community medicine professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio.

"The main finding is that for every thousand pounds of environmentally released mercury, we saw a 17 percent increase in autism rates," she said in an interview.

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Cancer hope for green tea extract

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BBC News
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/health/4348059.stm


A chemical extracted from green tea could help scientists to develop new drugs to fight cancer.

Tests by UK and Spanish researchers showed polyphenol EGCG taken from green tea leaves inhibits cancer cell growth.

The effect was seen even at low concentrations, equivalent to drinking two or three cups of green tea a day.

However, the study, published in Cancer Research, also found high concentrations of the chemical may increase the risk of birth defects.

We may be able to develop new anti-cancer drugs based on the structure of the EGCG molecule
Professor Roger Thorneley

Previous research has suggested that drinking green tea helps to cut the risk of certain forms of cancer.

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The New York TimesMarch 5, 2005
By GARDINER HARRIS

WASHINGTON, March 4 - Angered by quality-control problems it said had dragged on for more than two years, the Food and Drug Administration used armed federal marshals to seize millions of tablets of two medicines from facilities in Tennessee and Puerto Rico operated by GlaxoSmithKline, the agency said Friday.

The drugs are the antidepressant Paxil CR, which had $725 million in sales last year and is used by some 450,000 patients in the United States each month; and Avandamet, a diabetes medicine, whose sales are undisclosed but are far smaller.

The F.D.A. said that neither pill was medically necessary and that many alternatives existed for both. It added that it knew of no patients harmed by the poorly made pills and said patients could safely take any pills they had left.

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Labeling Kids Mentally Ill For Profit

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Scoop Independent News
Monday, 14 March 2005, 12:19 pm
By Evelyn Pringle
Miamisburg Ohio

Citing recommendations by the New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (NFC), Bush wants to launch a nationwide mental illness screening program in government institutions, including the public school system, for all students from kindergarten up to the 12th grade.

The New Freedom Commission was established by an Executive Order Bush issued on April 29, 2002. According to a July 22, 2003, press release, the Commission recommends transforming America’s mental health care system.

“Achieving this goal will require greater engagement and education of first line health care providers - primary care practitioners - and a greater focus on mental health care in institutions such as schools, child welfare programs, and the criminal and juvenile justice systems. The goal is integrated care that can screen, identify, and respond to problems early,” the Commission’s press release stated.

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By THERESA AGOVINO
The Associated Press
Thursday, March 10, 2005; 6:39 PM

NEW YORK - Hailed as a blockbuster drug, Vivexx is an antidepressant that its maker claims is so effective it will make standard bearer Prozac seem like “penny candy.”

There’s one hitch: Vivexx has been linked to liver problems that can cause death. But its manufacturer believes that pesky detail can be circumvented by stifling doctors who know about the problem and forbidding its sales representatives to raise the issue with physicians.

Sounds like real life, right?

But this is the plot of “Side Effects” a fictionalized account of the life of former drug sales representative Kathleen Slattery-Moschkau, the film’s writer and director.

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The Sunday Times - Britain
March 06, 2005
Lois Rogers, Medical Editor


EXPERTS are calling for a complete safety review of heart drugs taken by millions of Britons. Government figures released last week show that 92 deaths have been linked to the statin drugs developed to lower cholesterol.

It is believed that the death toll could be higher because doctors are reluctant to blame drugs they prescribe for harming patients.

More than 37 of the deaths were attributed to a formulation called simvastatin which is now being sold over the counter in low doses under the brand name Zocor.

Many specialists are concerned that the drug, produced by Merck, should be available without a prescription. A statin called Lipitor, made by Pfizer, was associated with 36 of the deaths.

Three other leading statin brands — Novartis’s Lescol, BMS’s Lipostat and AstraZeneca’s Crestor — have been associated with 19 deaths since they were introduced in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

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Dr. Harald Foster, a professor of geography with an interest in the influence of nutrient availability on disease, proposes to prevent suffering and death from Aids by a simple expedient: supply the nutrients that Aids patients are deficient in.

Andrew Saul of www.doctoryourself.com has interviewed Foster and published the interview in his excellent newsletter.

Here the introduction by Abram Hoffer, M.D, Ph.D.:

"What can one say about a scientist as accomplished, as brilliant, as knowledgeable as Harry Foster? I am delighted I have known him for so may years as a friend and colleague. His scientific writing is superb. He has a remarkable ability to examine all the data and to draw from that data conclusions that are going to be of the greatest value to mankind. I know of no one who has a better grasp of the relation between the soil that nourishes us and the diseases we get when that soil is not nourishing enough, and/or contains toxic elements. His three "What Really Causes" books (on Schizophrenia, AIDS and Alzheimer's Disease) are superb and ought to be required text books for medical students due to their insights and for the therapeutic potential that arises from them."

"I am especially excited bout his AIDS book which proves that while HIV plays an important role in the causation of AIDS, it is only one factor, and perhaps least important, since it only attacks in the absence of the essential components of glutathione peroxidase, especially selenium, the key variable. Much as the addition of niacinamide in 1942 to white flour by the US government eradicated pellagra from the South East United States, so will the addition of selenium to our staple foods lead to the eradication of AIDS. The virus may still spread and attack, but in the presence of ample amounts of selenium and three amino acids in the body it will do little harm. His work must be taken very seriously and followed up."

(Editor's note: I'd like to add my comment on to Dr. Hoffer's. Years from now, when your great-grandson perches on your knee, when the final history of AIDS has been written, I think it will show that the turning point in AIDS research was nutrition; that the pioneering figure was Harold Foster; and that the key was his book, What Really Causes AIDS.)

Now on to the interview...

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Doctor Contrary to Vaccinations

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Los Angeles Times
March 7, 2005
By Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer

Parents fearful of vaccines flock to him; experts denounce his stance.


A pregnant mother from Topanga Canyon has brought her toddler son to Dr. Jay Gordon for a checkup. Her son received all the recommended vaccinations, but she wonders aloud if she should do the same for her second child, who is due in a few months.

It’s a topic about which Gordon is passionate. Parents from around Southern California choose Gordon for his outspoken and controversial stance on vaccinations, driving from as far away as Santa Barbara and Long Beach.

They know he will lend a sympathetic ear to their concerns about the possible adverse side effects of childhood vaccinations — even though several large scientific studies have failed to find a connection.

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The New York Times
March 7, 2005
By ALEX BERENSON

A drug that could be one of the most promising new heart treatments in a decade is generating controversy even before it is approved, because its maker, Pfizer, plans to sell it only in combination with the company's best-selling cholesterol treatment, Lipitor.

At a cardiology conference in Orlando, Fla., today, researchers sponsored by Pfizer are expected to present positive new results about the drug, which has been shown in preliminary studies to substantially raise levels of what is known as good cholesterol, a novel approach to preventing heart disease.

The new drug, called torcetrapib, still must clear many hurdles before it is approved, including concerns that it may raise blood pressure, a serious side effect for a heart medicine. It would not reach the market before 2007, at the earliest. Still, scientists say the medicine could be an important new treatment, while Wall Street views its success as crucial for the future of Pfizer, the world's largest drug company.

Pfizer's critics, who include prominent cardiologists, say the company should offer torcetrapib as a stand-alone pill, so that patients can take it either with Lipitor or with similar drugs not from Pfizer that may work better for them. For some patients, torcetrapib might even work best by itself, they say.

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