Health Scout
September 9, 2005

The fatty acid DHA and its natural derivative fight Alzheimer's-related damage, study says

By Karen Pallarito
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Louisiana State University scientists say they have discovered how the fatty acids found in fish oil help protect the human brain from the type of cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Their study shows that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid found in coldwater fish such as mackerel, sardines and salmon, reduces levels of a protein known to cause damaging plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.

What's more, the researchers discovered that a derivative of DHA, which they dubbed "neuroprotectin D1" (NPD1), is made in the human brain. That natural substance plays a key role, too, in protecting the brain from cell death, the study showed.

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Drug Secrets - What the FDA isn't telling

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SLATE
http://slate.msn.com/id/2126918/
By Jeanne Lenzer
Posted Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2005

Traci Johnson's body was discovered on Feb. 7, 2004, hanging by a scarf from a shower rod in an Indianapolis laboratory run by the drug company Eli Lilly. The 19-year-old college student had been serving as a test subject in a clinical trial of the experimental antidepressant duloxetine. Investigators from the Food and Drug Administration rushed to Indianapolis to determine whether the experimental drug was related to her death. The probe was inconclusive.

This left researchers in a quandary: Was the drug safe or not? Could duloxetine trigger suicide, as some experts suggested? Or was Johnson's death an "isolated tragedy," as Eli Lilly claimed? When drug manufacturers fail to publish negative study results, as studies show is often the case, the best source of information about these questions is the FDA. The agency-which was rocked last week by the sudden resignation of Commissioner Lester Crawford-requires companies seeking approval for a drug to provide data from randomized controlled trials, studies in which some patients are given the drug and others are given a placebo. But when researchers and the press started asking about duloxetine, the FDA didn't scour its database and go public. It kept quiet. The FDA gave a legal rationale for its silence: Some clinical trial data are considered "trade secrets," or commercially protected information, and thus are exempted from release under the Freedom of Information Act. Since the FDA doesn't routinely perform comprehensive reviews of drugs once they are on the market, when uncommon but deadly side effects tend to be picked up, independent researchers are often the only hope of catching such flaws. But the trade-secrets rule can leave researchers in the dark about the most worrisome data-negative results that support a failed application to market a drug.

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Daily Mail - Health section
September 28, 2005


Around 40,000 children are prescribed anti-depressant medication when they should be offered 'talking' therapy first, a Government watchdog has warned.

New national guidelines tell doctors not to prescribe pills as a 'first line' defence against depression. Instead GPs should offer three months of 'talking' therapy first, according to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE).

The recommendations come after the revelation that half of children and teenagers on anti-depressants receive no psychological support.

Professor Peter Fonagy, chairman of the NICE guideline development group, said 30 per cent of those who suffer depression in childhood go on to have severe adult discorders.

"No other children's illness damages so many children so seriously," he said.

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Junk Food-Vote With Your Fork

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by: Health Lies Exposed
Date: September 9, 2005
By: Pam Killeen & Marion Nestle
Source: Crusador Investigative Reporter Pam Killeen Interviews Nutritionist Marion Nestle, PhD
http://www.healthliesexposed.com/articles/article_2005_09_10_5241.shtml

From February 3rd - 5th, 2005, the Pennsylvania Association of Sustainable Agriculture (PASA) held their 14th annual conference, Reclaiming Health: Nourishing our Farms and Families, Farming for the Future, 2005 at Penn State, State College, PA. Marion Nestle, PhD was one of the keynote speakers who presented her observations about the current state of the food industry. Marion Nestle is the Paulette Goddard Professor of the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University, a department she chaired for 15 years. Her degrees include a PhD in molecular biology and an M.P.H. in public health nutrition, both from the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of “Food Politics” (2002) and “Safe Food” (2003), both from University of California Press.

As a consumer I have often wondered how processed food companies get away with selling “junky”, sugar-laden cereals to our children. I finally heard the answer to my question when I listened to Dr. Nestle’s keynote address at the recent Pennsylvania Association of Sustainable Agriculture conference. Her most poignant remarks had to do with explaining how companies have been getting away with selling these cereals to our children. According to Dr. Nestle:

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Studies Question Flu Vaccines

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The New York Times
September 21, 2005

By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL

Rome, Sept. 21 - Just as governments around the world are stockpiling millions of doses of flu vaccine and antiviral drugs in anticipation of a potential influenza pandemic, two new research papers published today have found that such treatments are far less effective than previously thought.

"The studies published today reinforce the shortcomings of our efforts to control influenza," wrote Dr. Guan Yi, a virologist at the University of Hong Kong, in an editorial that accompanied the papers. The two studies were published early online by the British medical journal, the Lancet, because of their implications for the upcoming flu season.

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by Roger J. Williams, PhD.[1]
Summary and comments by Doctor Yourself volunteer Robert Sarver

Aside from the frank starvation there are three levels of nutrition that human beings have experienced: Poor, fair and good. "Supernutrition" (total nutrition in the most sophisticated sense) is above and beyond all these. It is concerned with the quality of nutrition, and is antithetical to caloric overnutrition.

"Poor nutrition" brings about in human populations severe underdevelopment of the young as well as deficiency diseases: beriberi, scurvy, pellagra, rickets, kwashiorkor and all the ill-defined combinations and variations of these afflictions.

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Ninety Percent of Babies Given Off-Label Drugs

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September 7, 2005
Dr. Joseph Mercola
Mercola.com

Babies and children are being given medicines not been approved for use by them, according to studies conducted in Britain. One estimate indicated they suffer as much as three times more side effects as a result.

When a "suitable alternative" did not exist, doctors used unlicensed or "off label" medicine in:

* 90 percent of babies in neonatal intensive care units
* 70 percent of children in pediatric intensive care units
* Two-thirds of children on general medical and surgical pediatric wards in the UK

Two studies suggest that children taking these medicines face a higher risk of side effects, with one estimate suggesting they suffer up to three times more side effects as a result. Part of the problem is that dosages for children are often not provided.

Information on how children react after taking the drugs, and what the side effects are, is not being collected.

Telegraph September 7, 2005

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Health Sciences Institute e-Alert
September 21, 2005

It might go something like this:

“I was feeling really, really sick and unhappy. Started eating. Feel great. I feel really good now. I feel so good it’s crazy.”

The word “eating” is the giveaway that this line isn’t spoken by a junkie; it’s spoken by a man who has eaten way too much fast food. The man is Morgan Spurlock, the documentary filmmaker who produced and directed “Super Size Me,” which I finally saw this past weekend.

If you haven’t seen or heard of this movie, here’s the nutshell: A healthy young man eats nothing but McDonald’s food for 30 days. Pretty simple. But it’s not just footage of a guy indulging in a junk food binge. He also reveals some surprising facts about how American’s eat, along with useful insights for a nation that needs to get back on track to better dietary choices.

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telegraph.co.uk
By Roya Nikkhah
18/09/2005

The number of children being prescribed drugs for so-called behavioural disorders has soared to a record high, causing alarm that children are being unnecessarily “drugged into submission”.

Prescriptions of Methylphenidate - most commonly sold as Ritalin - rose to 359,100 last year, a rise of 344,400 since 1995. Figures from the Prescriptions Pricing Authority reveal that there has been a 180-fold increase in prescriptions since 1991 when only 2,000 were issued in England.

Dawn James says her son Sam became withdrawn on Ritalin

The growing use of Ritalin - an amphetamine-based stimulant which improves concentration and is nicknamed the “chemical cosh” because of its calming effects - has alarmed critics. It is almost entirely prescribed to children under 16 in this country. Controversially, it has been estimated that one in 20 children suffers behavioural disorders such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD, for which Ritalin is prescribed.

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Hospital Deaths Rise Over Weekends

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The New England Journal of Medicine
August 30, 2001;345:663-668

Lower levels of hospital staffing on weekends may increase the risk of death among patients with some life-threatening disorders.

The study of nearly 3.8 million emergency hospitalizations in Canada found that patients with certain medical conditions were more likely to die if they were admitted on a Saturday or Sunday compared with patients admitted from Monday through Friday.

For instance, patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm — a tearing in the artery wall that causes potentially fatal bleeding — were 28% more likely to die when they were admitted on a weekend, the investigators found.

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