Avian Flu: Protect Yourself And Your Family

|

How to Protect Yourself and Your Family

Please Pass This Along To Everyone You Care About

by Rima Laibow

Worried about Avian Flu? Don't be. As a physician and a scientist, I want to share the best news of this flu season: You can prevent or treat the Avian Flu (IF it develops the ability to infect humans) easily, simply, cheaply, safely and naturally. And I know that there are things you can do to make the problem much, much worse. The choices are yours. Please share what you are about to read with everyone you know. This information could save huge numbers of lives.

Please remember, though, that this information is not a diagnosis or a treatment plan. It is educational material intended to help you develop your own personalized disease prevention or treatment strategy. You might want to consult a nutritional professional or natural physician to help you personalize it for you and your family.

  • Currently 4/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 4/5 (1 votes cast)

Free speech is not a right where certain corporations and criticism of their products are concerned, comments Robin Good of masternewmedia.org.

"In an alternative health newsletter I read came some interesting and disturbing news about free speech on the Internet. Dr. Joseph Mercola, whose Mercola.com website and newsletter are among the most widely read sources of alternative health-care information, has been coerced into blocking readers in the U.K. from reading his opinions about a controversial sugar alternative called Splenda.

Tate & Lyle, whose researchers developed sucralose (later branded as Splenda), joined forces with multinational firm Johnson & Johnson to market sucralose under the auspices of a new company, McNeil Nutritionals. So you can see why Mercola might feel compelled to respond to a legal threat from an entity with very deep pockets.

I find it sad that a corporation would try to squelch legitimate criticism of its product in this manner. Indeed, I'd suggest that it's counterproductive. These types of situations tend to get lots of publicity, and Splenda's safety as a food likely will become a larger issue. I wonder when corporations will get on the Cluetrain (http://www.cluetrain.com/) and understand that in our digitally networked world, it's better to publicly engage critics in a dialog rather than try to shut them down with brute force.

Silencing Mercola's point of view will only spawn a thousand other Internet critics who won't be cowed."

As we have already seen with Aspartame, the FDA and other countries' health authorities are largely standing by the side of manufacturers, when there are public doubts and complaints of adverse effects regarding artificial sugar substitutes, or any of their 'approved' products including pharmaceutical medicines. Once approved, these things seem to have a strange immunity to critical questions and even to voluminous information about actual adverse effects associated with them. We have seen this with Vioxx, the painkiller withdrawn only after tens of thousands of deaths were linked to it. We are seeing it again with psychiatric drugs that lead to suicide and violence and are still available.

With suppression of information and a public system of "health protection" that does not seem to function, we will just have to arm ourselves with information and make some conscious choices. After all, it's us who are buying or not buying, and there is no way any corporation will continue producing something they can't sell...

Here is the article in The Ecologist:

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Polly Want a Flu Shot?

|

Doctor Yourself Newsletter
by Andrew W. Saul
October 21, 2005

My daughter's parakeet is in grave danger.

Need you ask why? Because the Bird Flu is coming!

With all this terrifying talk about bird flu, I have a lingering question: Has anyone thought about protecting the birds? Living near Lake Ontario, I regularly feed entirely too many seagulls. They come inland as well. Just this weekend, I fed a characteristically ravenous flock of them at an interstate highway parking lot. The gulls encircled me like a Hitchcock movie. Another time, I was ungraciously harassed by a renegade herd of emus that I was, perhaps unwisely, attempting to feed. I had to climb up onto some boulders to get out of range.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

Settlement in Marketing of a Drug for AIDS

|

The New York Times
October 18, 2005
By Eric Lichtblau

WASHINGTON, Oct. 17 - A Swiss biotechnology company agreed on Monday to pay more than $700 million to settle federal charges that it illegally marketed an AIDS drug by concocting a dubious medical test for those with the disease and offering doctors an all-expenses-paid trip to France to prescribe the drug.

The agreement between the Justice Department and the company, Serono, is the third-largest settlement recovered by the federal government in a health care fraud case, officials said.

Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales said the company "put its desire to sell more drugs above the interest of patients."

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Life After Aspartame

|

The Ecologist, September 2005 issue - Volume 35, No.7.
By Pat Thomas
October 21, 2005

Aspartame should never have reached the marketplace. But even if the authorities were to remove it from sale tomorrow, how much faith should consumers place in the other artificial sweeteners on the market?

Life After Aspartame


There is not a single artificial sweetener on the market that can claim, beyond all reasonable doubt, to be safe for humans to consume.
Saccharin, cyclamate and acesulfame-K have all been show to cause cancer in animals. Even the family of relatively benign sweeteners known as polyols, such as sorbitol and mannitol, can cause gastric upset if eaten in quantity.

NutraSweet believes that its new aspartame-based sweetener, Neotame, is 'revolutionary'; but, seemingly, it is only a more stable version of aspartame. This leaves the market wide open for sucralose.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

News Target Insider
http://www.newstarget.com/011581.html
October 19, 2005
By Dani Veracity

Piglets worldwide may have a new mother pig… Monsanto Company. In case you haven't heard, Monsanto invented the pig. Well, not all pigs, just the really profitable ones. Nature can keep all the regular pigs, but if this company gets its way, Monsanto will own the prodigies.

In February 2005, Monsanto published multiple patent applications at the World Intellectual Property Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. These proposed patents encompass nearly the entire lifespan of a pig destined for slaughter, from conception to selection.

In application WO 2005/015989, Monsanto essentially attempts to patent careful selection of parentage and crossbreeding, elements of farming that have existed since the birth of agriculture and human civilization. According to Greenpeace writer Brian Thomas Fitzgerald, "The main 'invention' is nothing more than a particular combination of these elements designed to speed up the breeding process for selected traits." If a combination of techniques is patentable, what if some poor pig farmer "invented" the combination first, but without the craftiness or self-righteousness to believe that he could own it? We will probably never know.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION (AHRP)
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org
October 18, 2005

A front page report in The New York Times Science section pulls the rug out from yet another of psychiatry's myths. Benedict Carey reports:

"Not long ago, scientists predicted that these images, produced by sophisticated brain-scanning techniques, would help cut through the mystery of mental illness, revealing clear brain abnormalities and allowing doctors to better diagnose and treat a wide variety of disorders. And nearly every week, it seems, imaging researchers announce another finding, a potential key to understanding depression, attention deficit disorder, anxiety.

Yet for a variety of reasons, the hopes and claims for brain imaging in psychiatry have far outpaced the science, experts say.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Cannabis cancer risk played down

|

BBC News
October 17, 2005

Cannabis smoke is less likely to cause cancer than tobacco smoke, a leading US expert says.

Dr Robert Melamede, of the University of Colorado, said that, while chemically the two were similar, tobacco was more carcinogenic.

He said the difference was mainly due to nicotine in tobacco, whereas cannabis may inhibit cancer because of the presence of the chemical THC.

But health campaigners warned against complacency.

Cannabis remains the most commonly-used drug in the UK with one in 10 people using it in the last year, according to the British Crime Survey.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Don't Worry About Bird Flu

|

October 18, 2005
by Charley Reese
http://www.lewrockwell.com/reese/reese230.html

As of now, so far as we know, on Planet Earth about 60 people out of 6 billion have died of bird flu. All were involved in handling sick birds. There is, as of now, no recorded case of bird flu being transmitted from one human to another – something that is necessary before even an epidemic, much less a pandemic, could occur.

An epidemic is a widespread outbreak of a disease in a particular community at a particular time. A pandemic is an outbreak of disease in a whole country or in several countries. Pandemics occur, on the average, every 30 to 40 years.

What I'm trying to do is add some perspective to the current semihysteria being whipped up by politicians and the media. Certainly the virus that causes bird flu could mutate so that it could be transmitted from human to human. Such mutations, while typical of viruses, ordinarily occur over a period of years, not overnight.

  • Currently 4/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 4/5 (1 votes cast)

Toxic chemicals found in many new cars

|

Mail&Guardian - International
Berlin, Germany
12 October 2005 08:51

The intensive odour in many new cars results from a toxic cocktail of more than 100 different chemicals that can have serious health effects, the German environmental organisation Bund has warned.

"The concentration of chemicals surpasses the legal limit substantially in some cases," Bund chemical expert Patricia Cameron said.

"Even months after the car's production the chemicals leak into the car interior, endangering the health of the driver and passengers," according to the expert.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Health Supreme News

Loading...
Powered by Movable Type 5.13-en

Receive updates

Subscribe to get updates of this site by email:

Enter your Email


Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz

Recent Comments

Other sites of ours