(HealthDay News) -- If you're breast-feeding, you should stay away from certain drugs, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

These include medications for anxiety, depression, migraines and chemotherapy, the agency says.

Medications whose effects on nursing infants may be cause for concern include:

Anti-anxiety drugs: Alprazolam, Diazepam, Lorazepam, Midazolam, Perphenazine, Prazepam, Quazepam, Temazepam. Antidepressant drugs: Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Bupropion, Clomipramine, Desipramine, Dothiepin, Doxepin, Fluoxetine, Fluvoxamine, Imipramine, Nortriptyline, Paroxetine, Sertraline, Trazodone.

Antipsychotic drugs: Chlorpromazine Galactorrhea, Chlorprothixene, Clozapine, Haloperidol, Mesoridazine, Trifluoperazine. Other drugs: Amiodarone, Chloramphenicol, Clofazimine, Lamotrigine, Metoclopramide, Metronidazole, Tinidazole.

Talk to your doctor if you're not sure about whether any medication you're taking could harm your breast-feeding infant.

Copyright © 2006 http://www.healthday.com - HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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By: www.SixWisecom
February 16, 2006


Americans are prescribed millions of doses of prescription drugs every year. Livestock are given millions more. But after the pill has been swallowed or the injection taken, the active components of the drugs do not become inert or completely absorbed by the body.

One study found that 80 percent of streams tested contained antibiotics, steroids, synthetic hormones or other common drugs.

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Aspartame Safety In Question - Italian Study

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Not so sweet anymore: Aspartame under fire

By Melanie Warner The New York Times

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2006
(original on IHT)

NEW YORK When Dr. Morando Soffritti, a cancer researcher in Bologna, saw the results of his team's seven-year study on aspartame, he knew he was about to be injected into a bitter controversy over the sweetener, one of the most contentiously debated substances ever added to foods and beverages.
 
Aspartame is sold under the brand names NutraSweet and Equal and is found in popular products like Diet Coke, Diet Pepsi, Diet Snapple and Sugar Free Kool-Aid. About 200 million people consume it worldwide, according to the Calorie Control Council, a trade group for makers of artificial sweeteners.
 
Soffritti's study concluded that aspartame may cause cancer.
 

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latimes.com : National News
THE NATION
February 10, 2006

An FDA panel cites heart risks in its advisory on Ritalin and similar medications.

By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer

WASHINGTON — A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel Thursday urged that the strongest possible safety warning be issued for drugs used by millions of children and adults to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, because of emerging concern that they may increase the risks of heart attacks, strokes and sudden death.

The FDA had called the drug safety experts together to help design further research into such risks. But in an unexpected twist, the committee concluded that the evidence of serious risks was so great that a strong new warning — not just more research — was needed.

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By Salynn Boyles
WebMD Medical News Reviewed By Louise Chang, MD
February 06, 2006

Feb. 6, 2006 -- There is growing evidence that babies born to mothers who take antidepressants during pregnancy often experience symptoms of drug withdrawal shortly after birth.

In a new study from Israel, about one out of three newborn infants exposed to antidepressants in the womb showed signs of neonatal drug withdrawal, which included high-pitched crying, tremors, and disturbed sleep.

Researchers concluded that expectant moms who take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants and their doctors should be warned about the potential risk.

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Wall St. Journal
February 1, 2006 Page A1
By Mark Fritz
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

A Doctor's Fight: More Forced Care For the Mentally Ill
Torrey's Push for State Laws Sparks Growing Debate Over Rights of Patients
Mr. Hadd Goes Underground


The BELOW Front Page Story Features two MindFreedom Members and an "Underground Railroad"

Every other week, Jeff Demann drives to a clinic in rural Michigan, drops his pants and gets a shot of an antipsychotic drug that he says makes him sick.

"If I don't show up, the cops show up at my door and I wind up in a mental ward," says the unemployed 44-year-old, who lives on disability in Holland, Mich.

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OpEdNews.com
December 15, 2005
By Sue Weibert

The Genesis of President Bush’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health

Screening for mental illness is the most controversial topic concerning mental health today. Various government entities, private foundations, organizations, think tanks and universities, all flanked by cunning public relations firms, are hard at work trying to make mental health screening as common as a dental checkup. Despite public outrage over screening, these entities are working feverishly to establish this system. With so much clamor of disagreement for such a program, why, then, do these entities push forward with such ferocity? This article reveals exactly how this all got started, who’s really behind “the big push,” and how President Bush was tricked into establishing what might be the most detrimental program in the history of mankind.

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"The main advantage of individual failures is that they give a pretext for virtuous protestations from those whose success is based upon systemic failures." Dr. Marc Girard

For a number of weeks now, we have been treated to a revelations of dishonest medical research reporting, starting with Woo Suk Hwang's stem-cell research in South Korea. Next Jon Sudbo, a Norwegian scientist, was charged with inventing hundreds of patients and making up figures, yet publishing his "research" in a respected journal. Another example is the story of Japanese professor Kazunari Taira, accused of fabricating papers on human enzymes produced by bacteria.

These stories, for whatever truth they may contain, may well act to cover up a larger problem: The research policies that induce dishonesty in science. Pressures on researchers to "publish or perish" and pressures on journals to come up with supportive articles or lose pharma advertising are an open secret to those who work in the sector.

An essay by French mathematician and physician Dr. Girard gives us an interesting view on the subject of fake research and "virtuous protestations" ... (thanks to Vera Hassner Sharav of the Alliance for Human Research Protection who forwarded the essay). Vera introduces the article and says:

An original essay by Dr. Marc Girard, a mathematician and physician who serves on the editorial board of Medicine Veritas, (The Journal of Medical Truth) a peer reviewed, open source journal "Dedicated to Leveling out the Medical Playing Field."

Dr. Girard is not impressed with the disingenuous displays of "outrage" at individual scientists who got caught committing fraud - e.g., Hwang Woo Suk: "the main advantage of individual failures," he writes, "is that they give a pretext for virtuous protestations from those whose success is based upon systemic failures."
Scientific integrity: "Truth" versus method

Here is Dr. Girard's article:

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By Dan Olmsted
UPI Senior Editor

CHICAGO, Dec. 7 (UPI) -- It's a far piece from the horse-and-buggies of Lancaster County, Pa., to the cars and freeways of Cook County, Ill.

But thousands of children cared for by Homefirst Health Services in metropolitan Chicago have at least two things in common with thousands of Amish children in rural Lancaster: They have never been vaccinated. And they don't have autism.

"We have a fairly large practice. We have about 30,000 or 35,000 children that we've taken care of over the years, and I don't think we have a single case of autism in children delivered by us who never received vaccines," said Dr. Mayer Eisenstein, Homefirst's medical director who founded the practice in 1973. Homefirst doctors have delivered more than 15,000 babies at home, and thousands of them have never been vaccinated.

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Depression screenings faulty

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The Minnesota daily
By Brian Hokanson
January 25, 2006


Any combination of answers resulted in recommendations to see a doctor.


At the beginning of fall semester I noticed fliers in my residence hall encouraging students to take the free depression screening test at depression-screening.org.

Having a vague hunch as to what might follow, I visited the Web site. The first section of the test consists of a list of negative behaviors such as "feeling bad about yourself" and "feeling tired or having little energy." The test-taker chooses how often the statements have applied to him or her in the past two weeks, from "not at all" to "nearly every day."

The second part asks you to rate how difficult the behaviors have made it to function in daily life, from "not difficult at all" to "extremely difficult."

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