HealthSentinel.com
By Janne Larsson,
Press Release
February 16, 2006

Strattera is a failed antidepressant, which Eli Lilly didn’t succeed to get approved. It was recycled and used as an “ADHD medication”, and marketed as the first “non stimulant medication for ADHD”. As many parents, despite all published lies about the “benefits” of stimulants like Ritalin, Concerta and Adderall, don’t want to give dangerous narcotic drugs to their kids, Lilly saw the chance to get a good market share for Strattera.

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By Dr. Ward Dean MD

Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness, accounting for about 42 percent of all cases of blindness worldwide (affecting about 17 million people). Twenty-eight thousand new cases are reported everyday. About 20 percent of all people over 60 have at least the beginning of a cataract in one or both eyes, and that figure rises to 80 percent for people over 75.

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Prescription For an Obsession?

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By Shankar Vedantam
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, March 19, 2006; Page A01

Gambling, Sex Manias Called Surprise Risks Of Parkinson’s Drugs

When Wayne Kanuch received a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease in 1993, the last thing he imagined was that the drug prescribed to treat his illness would turn him into a compulsive gambler and put his libido into overdrive

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Chiron recalls vaccine, revises 2005 earnings

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Chiron recalls vaccine, revises 2005 earnings
Thursday 16 March 2006, 9:51am EST

CHICAGO, March 16 (Reuters) - Chiron Corp. on Thursday said it is recalling and withdrawing its measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, MORUPAR, from Italian and developing world markets because it may be associated with a higher rate of adverse side effects than other such vaccines.

The adverse events on which the recall and withdrawal are based are within a range of those commonly associated with vaccines, such as fever, allergic reactions and swelling of the glands, Chiron said.

As a result of the recall and other adjustments, Chiron said it revised its 2005 net earnings per share to 94 cents from 97 cents per share.

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Eleven patients die in Eisai drug trial

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Eleven patients die in Eisai drug trial
Thu Mar 16, 2006 10:55 AM ET
CHICAGO (Reuters) - Eleven patients have died while taking Alzheimer's disease drug Aricept during a clinical trial, Japan's Eisai Co., which makes the medicine, said on Thursday.

There were no deaths among patients who were taking a placebo, said Eisai, which markets Aricept with Pfizer Inc.

The drug, which treats mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, was being tested in patients with vascular dementia, the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease.

Applications to expand the use of Aricept to vascular dementia, which is caused by a stroke or diseased blood vessels, are pending in both the United States and Europe, said Eisai spokeswoman Judee Shuler.

"We are still working with the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration), discussing it," she said.

Shuler said she could not comment on how the results might affect the status of Aricept. Pfizer officials were not immediately available.

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Fluoride Does Not Prevent Tooth Decay

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Fluoride, as added to the water supply in many locations, is an industrial byproduct, and a hazardous one at that. The mineral is highly toxic but is promoted as a great way to avoid tooth decay. Only, it does not do what its proponents say.

A recent Doctor Yourself newsletter has the lowdown citing scientific studies that show fluoride is not effective for what it's claimed to do. Wonder how long it will take health authorities to catch on to the scam - or is there some other reason why fluoride is so liberally added to our drinks and the water we use?

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Six taken ill after drug trials

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BBC News
March 15, 2006

Six men remain in intensive care after being taken ill during a clinical drugs trial in north-west London.

The healthy volunteers were testing an anti-inflammatory drug at a research unit based at Northwick Park Hospital when they suffered a reaction.

Relatives are with the patients, who suffered multiple organ failure. Two men are said to be critically ill.

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Lawyers and Settlements
lawyersandsettlements.com
March 13, 2006
By Evelyn Pringle*

On January 3, 2006 the Global Exchange Report named the top fourteen "Worst Corporate Evildoers" in the world for 2005. Pfizer, one of the most profitable drug companies on earth, with sales over $52 billion in 2004, made the list of Evildoers.

Pfizer's participation in the cover-up of the deadly side effects of Bextra surely contributed to its membership. Because the drug was promoted and sold off-label for so many unapproved uses, the company made hundreds of millions of dollars in pure profits during Bextra's short life on the market. However, experts predict that when all is said and done, the total amount of the drug's damage to consumers will be in the billions.

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BBC News
March 13, 2006

Tough measures to reduce the use of mercury in Europe are to be debated in the European parliament.

A resolution from Cypriot MEP Marios Matsakis calls for a ban on EU mercury exports by 2010 and steps to extract and collect mercury from all waste.

Mercury collects and concentrates in the aquatic food chain

The resolution describes mercury as a "global threat", particularly harmful to babies as they develop in the womb.

Experts say many fishing communities in the Mediterranean and Arctic have already absorbed unsafe levels.

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Physorg.com
Science, Technology, Physics
March 13, 2006

Scientists from Old Dominion University and Eastern Virginia Medical School say they've killed melanomas in mice using high-powered jolts of electricity.

Using extremely short, high-voltage doses of electricity, the researchers told the Virginian-Pilot they've never had a tumor that did not respond to the treatment.

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