Los Angeles Times Health
By Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
April 3, 2006

Rare instances of jaw decay are being linked to medicines used to prevent bone loss.

Sue Piervin never suspected the pills she took to strengthen her bones could severely damage her jaw. Twelve years ago, a routine X-ray revealed her bones were thinning, so her doctor prescribed a drug to help stop the erosion of bone density. Then, in 1999, Piervin developed a painful bone spur in her jaw that had decayed to such an extent that it had to be surgically removed.

At the time, doctors were puzzled. But when she had a recurrence last year, they had a pretty good idea what was causing the trouble: Fosamax, the medication she was taking to prevent bone loss.

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The Washington Times
UPI Consumer Health Correspondent
Christine Dell'Amore
Feb. 22, 2006

Children who switched their diets for only a few days to organic foods dramatically and immediately lowered the amount of toxic pesticides in their bodies, researchers report.

Lead author Chensheng Lu of Emory University found that when kids eat organic foods, pesticides in their body plummet to undetectable levels -- even when following the diet for only five days.

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Source: Life Extention

http://www.lef.org

(Author's name withheld due to the controversial nature of this article.)

George Washington cut down one tree. Bureaucrats in Washington, DC, are trying to pull up the whole orchard. On October 17, 2005, letters went out from the Food and Drug Administration warning cherry purveyors that they had better quit telling people that cherries have health benefits or dire things are going to happen. The lucky recipients were warned that it's illegal to say things like, "The same chemicals that give tart cherries their color may relieve pain better than aspirin and ibuprofen." estimonials such as "I no longer take any drugs!" had better cease-or else.

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by www.SixWise.com

Capsaicin, the active ingredient in chili peppers, is so hot that it can make your mouth feel like it's on fire.

This phytochemical exists in peppers, most likely, to deter animals from eating them, and is also the active component of pepper sprays used for self-defense. Yet for humans, when capsaicin is consumed in a somewhat diluted form, such as in hot sauce, chili peppers or cayenne peppers, it offers a myriad of health benefits.

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March 18, 2006

Dr. Sherri Tenpenny cracks the bird flu code in this explosive interview with IO editor Don Harkins and sheds amazing light on what is turning out to be one of the biggest propaganda campaigns in the history of modern medicine.

We've all been hearing the news about bird flu. Daily reports tell us that this "so-called" deadly and dangerous strain of influenza is going to jump the species barrier and cause millions of people around the world to get sick and possibly die.

In this enlightening interview, Dr. Sherri Tenpenny will forever change the way you view environmental policy, the pharmaceutical industry and the government's role in the dissemination of public health information. Dr. Tenpenny looks beyond the hysteria and exposes the vested interests poised to exploit the fear being generated about bird flu.

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The Washington Times
United Press international
By Dan Olmsted
UPI Senior Editor
Dec. 7, 2005 at 2:08PM

It's a far piece from the horse-and-buggies of Lancaster County, Pa., to the cars and freeways of Cook County, Ill.

But thousands of children cared for by Homefirst Health Services in metropolitan Chicago have at least two things in common with thousands of Amish children in rural Lancaster: They have never been vaccinated. And they don't have autism.

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Is it really ADHD?

| | Comments (0)

By Kenneth W. Thomas, RN *


You child can be labelled "ADHD" based on a certain list of behaviors. Yet, how can you be sure that your child really has a permanent, incurable brain disorder? Could the symptoms of ADHD indicate something else?


"Doctor, my child doesn't sleep well. He stays busy all the time. One minute he's happy, the next he's crying. He still has some bed-wetting problems and complains about headaches and stomach pains. He's a finicky eater. His teacher says he's restless and doesn't concentrate well, particularly after lunch. When the other students are ready to take their nap, he's just buzzing all over the place and rather unruly."

According to some of the "experts" in the fields of child behavior and "mental illness", this child obviously has a brain chemical imbalance, which causes Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). As the parent of this child, you may be told that your child's only hope is to take mind-altering drugs to control this behavior. The diagnosis of ADHD can be made in a psychiatrist's or physician's office, without any laboratory tests or any objective testing at all. Even a school psychologist can diagnose ADHD. The list of symptoms is all that's required.

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The West Virginia Record
Thursday, March 23, 2006
By Steve Korris - Point Pleasant Bureau

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CommonDreams.org
by Lewis Seiler & Dan Hamburg
March 22, 2006 by

Top Republican so-called leaders—Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) and House Speaker Dennis Hastert (R-IL)—recently sold the future of our children to Big Pharma for a paltry $4 bucks a pop. That’s the additional cost to produce a safe vaccine, a vaccine minus the mercury-based preservative thimerosal. Mercury is a deadly neurotoxin that has long been known to cause serious learning disabilities, autism, and death.

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Psychosis in kids - Possible tie to ADHD meds

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Feds alarmed by psychosis in kids
Possible tie to attention-deficit-disorder meds

BY PAUL H.B. SHIN
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

More than 500 children on medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have reported bouts of psychosis, federal health officials revealed yesterday at a hearing to determine if tougher warnings were warranted for the popular stimulants.

And at least five kids on Adderall XR - one of the most prescribed ADHD drugs - have died from possible heart failure since it was approved for pediatric use in October 2004, the Food and Drug Administration said.

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