Top Stories – Yahoo! India News
April 8, 2006

By Indo Asian News Service

Toronto, April 8 (IANS) Women who take a type of antidepressant medication during pregnancy face the risk of a stillborn baby, warns a study.

Canadian researchers at the University of Ottawa compared the health of babies born to 972 women taking SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) with that of babies born to mothers who did not use anti-depressants.

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Vitamin C: Good for Gout

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Healthnotes Newswire
By Alan R. Gaby, MD

Supplementing with vitamin C may help prevent gout by lowering blood levels of uric acid, reports Arthritis and Rheumatism (2005;52:1843-7). While a previous study showed that taking a large dose of vitamin C (8 grams per day) can lower blood levels of uric acid, this is the first study to show that a relatively modest amount (500 mg per day) has the same effect.

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NewScientist.com news service
April 5, 2006
By Gaia Vince

A catastrophic drug safety trial which left six healthy volunteers fighting for their lives was the result of “a powerful pharmacological effect of the product in humans”, the UK government agency charged with investigating the incident said on Wednesday.

The novel drug, called TGN1412, caused multiple organ failure in the six men injected with it at a Northwick Park Hospital, London, UK, on 13 March.

The severe patient reaction in the first human phase I safety trial of the drug was not due to a dosing error, product contamination or manufacturing problems, and the trial was conducted properly according to the agreed protocol, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) said, announcing its interim findings.

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The Times
April 5, 2006
By Sam Lister, Health Correspondent

ONE in four medications may not work properly if taken with St John’s wort or echinacea because they cause the drugs to be moved out of the body too quickly, research suggests.

A study by an American pharmacologist indicates that the two herbal extracts, often taken for depression and to boost the immune system, increase activity of an enzyme involved in the processing of many drugs.

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News Target Insider
NewsTarget.com
April 5 2006
By Alexis Black

Over the years, countless studies have shown that when it comes to infant nutrition, breast milk is best. This fact remains true, as there is simply no infant formula product on the market that can match the superior nutrition of mother's milk. In fact, some infant formulas actually contain ingredients that can be harmful to your baby.

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NewsTarget.com
April 4 2006
By Mike Adams

This is an article about the disease economy. That's a term I coined because I could find no other existing term to describe what I'm observing in our economy today. I call it the disease economy because such a huge percentage of the economic activity and economic growth I see in this country is based on the manufacturing, marketing and selling of products and services based on disease. That is, products and services that either cause diseases or "treat" those diseases.

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by www.SixWise.com

Radio Frequency Identification Tags (RFIDs) are a type of automatic identification method that's already being used to track everything from prescription drugs to pets and, in some cases, even humans.

Experts predict 33 billion of these tiny chips will be produced by 2010 -- 30 times the number produced in 2005.

An example of the rice-sized "Verichip," an implantable RFID tag.

Some tout these information tags as the new-and-improved bar code, as RFIDs are capable of holding much more information and do not require line-of-sight scanning, meaning they can be read from a distance.

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Physorg.com
Science, Technology, Physics, space News
April 4, 2006

Japanese researchers say mice lacking vitamin C age four times faster than normal mice, suggesting the vitamin might help slow aging in humans.

The scientists from the Tokyo Medical and Dental University and the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology analyzed a specific protein that decreases as aging proceeds and found it was the same as an enzyme that synthesizes vitamin C, the Mainichi news service reported.

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From Dr. Betty Martini, D. Hum
April 3, 2006

Aspartame (NutraSweet/Equal/Spoonful, E951, Benevia, Canderel, etc.) is an excitoneurotoxic carcinogenic drug that interacts with all drugs and vaccines. http://www.wnho.net/aspartame_interacts.htm Because it's an actual chemical poison it causes polychemical sensitivity syndrome or MCS, so even if victims get off this toxin they often think they are allergic to other things, react to genetically engineered products, and synthetic sweeteners which are
toxins themselves like Sucralose (Splenda) a chlorocarbon poison. http://www.wnho.net/splenda_chlorocarbon.htm These are toxic, not allergic reactions.

Neurosurgeon Russell Blaylock, M.D., author of Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills on aspartame and MSG, and Health & Nutrition Secrets To Save Your Life, described the toxic effects of aspartame: "Aspartame, an L aspartyl L-phenylalanine methyl ester, is composed of two amino acids, aspartate and phenylalanine, linked by methanol. Inside the gastrointestinal tract, especially in the stomach, it's broken down into its constituent components. In some instance the dipeptide is lysed within the cells of the gut. As a consequence the methanol is rapidly absorbed and distributed throughout the tissues of the body. Within the tissues, substantial amounts of methanol's two metabolic breakdown products (formaldehyde and formic acid) have been shown to accumulate in many tissues."

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The Austrialian
Clara Pirani, Medical reporter
March 27, 2006

CHILDREN as young as five have suffered strokes, heart attacks, hallucinations and convulsions after taking drugs to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Documents obtained by The Australian reveal that almost 400 serious adverse reactions have been reported to the Therapeutic Goods Administration, some involving children as young as three.

Cases include the sudden death of a seven-year-old, and a five-year-old who suffered a stroke after taking Ritalin. Children also experienced heart palpitations and shortness of breath after taking Dexamphetamine.

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