The scotsman
May 2, 2006
By Louise Gray Scottish political Correspondent

Research found residents were being given drugs without their permission.Picture: Phil Wilkinson

Fears over secret drugs for OAPs

* One in seven nursing homes giving medication without consent
* Research conducted by care homes watchdog Care Commission
* 14 out of the 101 care homes surveyed administered drugs covertly

Key quote ""If I end up in a care home - which one in five of us do - I want to be able to eat my food and drink without worrying about what it might contain," - Mr Watson

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April 10, 2006

PRNewswire

Get the Facts on April 11th, BioETHICS Chicago Conference CHICAGO,

On April 6, a bipartisan Congressional group, with strong support in both Houses, announced plans to introduce legislation amending the National School Lunch Act.

This would prohibit the sale in schools of sugary or fatty junk foods, notably soft drinks and French fries.

This initiative officially endorses longstanding efforts by many school districts to provide only healthy foods, and hopefully reduce the growing incidence of childhood obesity and related diseases.

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SHERYL UBELACKER
Canadian Press

Toronto ˜ Seniors prescribed antidepressants such as Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft are almost five times more likely to commit suicide during the first month on the drugs than those given other classes of medications to treat depression, a new study suggests.

While studies have found an increased prevalence of suicidal thoughts among children and teens taking the drugs--known as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, or SSRIs--little research has been done on the drugs' possible link to self-harm in aging patients.

"Suicides are more common in older people," said Dr. David Juurlink, lead author of the study by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Toronto. "Older people tend to use more violent means, which is why they succeed more often than teenagers, who often use overdoses."

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BBC NEWS
May 1, 2006

The world is failing children by not ensuring they have enough to eat, says the UN Children's Fund (Unicef).

It says the number of children under five who are underweight has remained virtually unchanged since 1990, despite a target to reduce the number affected.

Half of all the under-nourished children in the world live in South Asia, Unicef reported.

And it said poor nutrition contributes to about 5.6 million child deaths per year, more than half the total.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Caspian-Newsletter
April 27, 2006

Levi Strauss Confirms RFID Test, Refuses to Disclose Location

It may be time to ditch your Dockers and lay off the Levi's, say privacy activists Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre. New information confirms that Levi Strauss & Co. is violating a call for a moratorium on item-level RFID by spychipping its clothing. What's more, the company is refusing to disclose the location of its U.S. test.

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a controversial technology that uses tiny microchips to track items from a distance. These RFID microchips have earned the nickname "spychips" because each contains a unique identification number, like a Social Security number for things, that can be read silently and invisibly by radio waves. Over 40 of the world's leading privacy and civil liberties organizations have called for a moratorium on chipping individual consumer items because the technology can be used to track people without their knowledge or consent.

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Salt Lake Tribune
April 20, 2006
By Rob Waters
Bloomberg News

Most of the psychiatrists who helped write a standard manual that guides the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders have financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry, a study found.

The manual, published by the American Psychiatric Association since 1952, lists mental disorders, outlines how to diagnose them and includes diagnostic codes that help determine how patients are treated, what medications should be used and whether insurance companies will pay for services.

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Orthomolecular Medicine News Service

HIV Depletes Body of Selenium and Three Amino Acids

(OMNS, April 26, 2006) New clinical reports from Zambia, Uganda and South Africa indicate that AIDS may be stopped by nutritional supplementation. A number of members of the medical profession have observed that high doses of the trace element selenium, and of the amino acids cysteine, tryptophan, and glutamine can together rapidly reverse the symptoms of AIDS, as predicted by Dr. Harold D. Foster's nutritional hypothesis. (1)

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April 25, 2006
By Evelyn Pringle

Secrecy agreements in litigation hide information about defective products or a company’s negligence, and sometimes go so far as to prohibit the parties from discussing that there ever was a lawsuit. Such is the case with Paxil and as a result, unwitting patients continued to take the drug long after its dangers were known to GlaxoSmithKline.

Many lawsuits filed against Glaxo have been settled out of court, with confidential agreements that prevent the public from knowing about the harmful effects of the Paxil.

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ANH Press Release
19 April 2006
By Dr Robert Verkerk, Executive & Scientific Director, Alliance for Natural Health

On 24 March 2006, The British Medical Journal’ published a meta-analysis (a study of other studies) on omega-3 fatty acids [1] that prompted headlines around the world to the effect that “fish oils don’t work”. This is not the first time a meta-analysis has triggered headlines that discredit natural health supplements.

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By LYNN BREZOSKY
Associated Press Writer
Fri Apr 21, 5:21 PM ET

A state jury found Merck & Co. liable Friday for the death of a 71-year-old man who had a fatal heart attack within a month of taking its since-withdrawn painkiller Vioxx and ordered the company to pay $32 million. Merck said it would appeal.

The damage award will likely be reduced because of a state law capping punitive damages.

The jury of 10 men and two women deliberated for about seven hours over two days before returning the verdict in favor of the family of Leonel Garza, who had suffered from heart disease for more than 20 years and had taken Vioxx for less than a month.

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