The Huffington Post
Dr. Peter Breggin
May 21, 2006

Getting the FDA to move forward by presenting it with scientific data is like using a peacock feather to tickle a sleeping giant tortoise on its shell. Many people die before the agency opens its eyes and then it barely reacts at all.

Bloated with conflicts of interest, under the best of conditions the FDA is barely able to drag itself along the ground.

Slowly, oh, so slowly, it inches its way toward the obvious conclusion it can never quite reach: Antidepressants cause suicide; therefore, they aren't antidepressants at all. These drugs don't cure depression--and they frequently cause or worsen it. Regarding the most dreadful risk of depression, suicide, so-called antidepressants put depressed people of all ages at much greater risk of killing themselves.

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The Ultimate Spy Tool

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Wired News
By Robert Poe|
May 17, 2006

The equipment that technician Mark Klein learned was installed in the National Security Agency's "secret room" inside AT&T's San Francisco switching office isn't some sinister Big Brother box designed solely to help governments eavesdrop on citizens' internet communications.

Rather, it's a powerful commercial network-analysis product with all sorts of valuable uses for network operators. It just happens to be capable of doing things that make it one of the best internet spy tools around.

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NewsTarget.com
Originally published May 23 2006

Did you know that many drugs are used legally in the United States today for diseases and conditions they were never approved for? It's called off-label drug use, and it's a common practice that promotes the sale of prescription drugs and circumvents the so-called "gold standard" drug safety procedures the FDA claims to enforce.

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Psychiatric Times
By Stephen Barlas,
May 2006, Vol. XXIII, No. 6

Concerns about the appropriate use of psychiatric medications in children continue to be the subject of discussion by regulatory agencies. In late 2004, the issues were possible suicidal ideation and suicide attempts as side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressants. This past February, concerns arose about potential cardiovascular effects of drugs used to manage attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). At the same time, questions remain about the effectiveness of SSRIs for depression in children.

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ALERT OVER NEW 5-IN-1 BABY JABS

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SUNDAY EXPRESS
MAY 14 2006
FRONT PAGE STORY EXCLUSIVE
By Lucy Johnston
HEALTH EDITOR

Brain damage fears after trial results show that two-thirds of patients experience bad reaction

Babys given the new five-in-one jab face a risk of convulsions, brain damage or even death.

Results of medical trials by the firm which makes the vaccine have revealed that the "superdose" vaccination, which was introduced 18 months ago, can have serious side-effects.

The five-in-one is designed to protect children against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, Hib influenza and polio in a single shot.

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The Los Angeles Times
COLUMN ONE
By Denise Gellene
Times Staff Writer
May 23, 2006

Drugs that relieve Parkinson's symptoms may also trigger odd urges: jet skiing up the coast, collecting toys or gambling compulsively.

Faced with steady deterioration from Parkinson's disease, Jim Sweet leapt at the chance to try a new drug that promised to relieve the tremors brought on by the death of cells deep in his brain.

Like older Parkinson's medicines, Mirapex could bolster the fading supply of a critical brain chemical called dopamine. It was a blessing for Sweet — until something unusual started happening.

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I am one of the only few "Nutra Sweet Dissidents" to ever see the first (original) pre-marketing Aspartame toxicity studies. It has to be strongly emphasized! These first studies were done at only 1/1000th the legally required Aspartame dosage levels. (And for
only sixty days!) The law specifies that one hundred times the "greatest possible maximum human consumption" must always be used in pre-marketing testing of animals. This law is entirely conservative, because it only allows for only a ten fold species to
species variation of effect, and only a ten fold variation of individual effect within a given species: In order to protect all humans who may ever ingest a given chemical! Only 3 cans of pop per day (level) scaled down the weight of each given animal species, was ever used, in spite of the thousands of ways Aspartame is presently dosed into us, even being "sneaked" in with yogurts, chewing gums, etc! (The FDA recently got a law enacted that "ASPARTAME" does not now even have to be at all mentioned on the product label itself!)

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 18, 2006
CASPIAN Newsletter

VERICHIP INJECTS ITSELF INTO IMMIGRATION DEBATE

Scott Silverman, Chairman of the Board of VeriChip Corporation, has alarmed civil libertarians by promoting the company's subcutaneous human tracking device as a way to identify immigrants and guest workers. He appeared on the Fox News Channel earlier this week, the morning after President Bush called for high-tech measures to clamp down on Mexican immigrants.

Privacy advocates Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre are warning that a government-sanctioned chipping program such as that suggested by Silverman could quickly be expanded to include U.S. citizens, as well.

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Bastyr Center for Natural Health

Dr. Alan R. Gaby

Chromium supplementation may relieve symptoms in people with a mood disorder known as atypical depression, according to the Journal of Psychiatric Practice (2005;11:302ˆ14). These findings are good news for the many people who suffer from this often difficult to treat condition.

Atypical depression, the most common form of depression in outpatients, is characterized by increased appetite, excessive sleepiness, sluggishness, and increased sensitivity to being rejected by another person and improved mood when something good happens (mood reactivity). Compared with other forms of depression, atypical depression tends to be more chronic and is associated with more suicidal thoughts and greater disability. Medical therapy usually consists of a specific type of antidepressant drug (monoamine oxidase inhibitors).

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The New York Times
By David G. Savage
Times Staff Writer
May 13, 2006

WASHINGTON — While Capitol Hill debated the issue Friday, many lawyers voiced surprise that three major telephone companies had agreed to make available to the National Security Agency the phone records of tens of millions of Americans.

That's because Congress made it illegal 20 years ago for telephone companies and computer service providers to turn over to the government records showing who their customers had dialed or e-mailed.

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