by www.SixWise.com

A three-foot long, unmanned aircraft, similar to a high-tech model plane, is being tested as the latest secret weapon against crime by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.

The drone aircraft, known as the SkySeer, would give police in the area a major advantage, but some consumer activists are concerned about the drone's potential to invade the public's privacy.

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In Crap Shoot
by Evelyn Pringle
July 3, 2006
http://www.opednews.com

Complications from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAID, have been linked to 103,000 hospitalizations and more than 16,000 deaths per year in the US, according to a study published in the American Journal of Therapeutics.

A lack of information, experts say, is the root cause of the lack of concern over the health risks associated with NSAIDs. A report in the January 16, 2005, Science Daily said: "More people die each year from NSAIDs-related complications than from AIDS and cervical cancer in the United States."

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
By Jim Gottstein
June 30, 2006

FREEDOMS FOR ALL, IN TIME FOR THE 4th

In a resounding affirmation of personal liberty and freedom, the Alaska Supreme Court issued its long-awaited decision in Myers v. Alaska Psychiatric Institute today. The court found Alaska's forced psychiatric drugging regime to be unconstitutional when the state forces someone to take psychiatric medications without proving it to be in their best interests or when there are less restrictive alternatives.

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NewsTarget.com
June 30 2006

Public trust in conventional medicine has plummeted to such an all-time low that the industry is now resorting to the threat of violence in order to market its services. Gunpoint medicine is alive and well in Seattle, Washington, where county law enforcement officers, prompted by Child Protective Services (CPS), arrested and jailed 34-year-old Tina Marie Carlsen for her "crime" of rescuing her infant from overzealous hospital staff who demanded they perform kidney surgery on the infant.

Terrorized by the incident, charged with second-degree kidnapping of her own child, and threatened with bail of $500,000, Tina Carlsen was jailed for several days, during which she was unable to provide lifesaving mother's milk to her baby (which is crucial for a child's brain and immune system). She has still not been allowed physical contact with her infant son.

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Townsend Letter
July 2006

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently noted the frequency of prolactin-producing pituitary tumors in patients taking risperidone, a drug widely prescribed for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. 1 Of 64 patients with pituitary tumors receiving anti-psychotics, 48 had been using risperidone.

I have reported (a) the stimulation of prolactin by phenylalanine, of the amino acids in aspartame, 2 and (b) the occurrence of prolactin-secreting pituitary tumors among persons taking aspartame in "diet" products. 3 I also have reviewed the occurrence of brain tumors in persons consuming aspartame products, 4, and I am maintaining a registry thereon.

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By Missy Stoddard
South Florida Sun-Sentinel
June 22, 2006

An appeals court on Wednesday overturned the conviction of a Delray Beach hair stylist who gunned down his estranged wife's lover in 2000.

The court ruled that a jury should have been allowed to hear evidence that the man was under the influence of antidepressants at the time of the killing.

Saying a judge erred by refusing to allow an "involuntary intoxication defense," the 4th District Court of Appeal reversed the murder conviction and life sentence of Eugene Lucherini, who testified that he was "in a fog" when he shot Edward Wallace after breaking into his apartment.

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NewsTarget.com
June 28 2006

(NewsTarget) -- New evidence showing that beta blocker drugs increase patients' risk of strokes, heart attacks and diabetes has led to 2 million Britons being taken off the blood-pressure drugs.

A 2005 study found that beta blockers cut a patient's risk of stroke by 20 percent, whereas newer treatments are shown to prevent 40 percent of strokes and 15 percent more heart attacks. The study results led the British National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence to issue new prescribing guidelines. The new recommendations now make drugs such as ACE inhibitors, diuretics and calcium channel blockers the first choice for treatment.

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By Dr. Betty Martini
Mission Possible International
June 17 2006

Dear Denise,

If you're going to write you need to research. To try and discredit the impeccable Ramazzini Study is obscene. You can understand the influence of the aspartame industry with people on government committees with links to manufacturers like Ajinomoto. The FDA whenever the word gets out big time about aspartame dangers has a policy of saying they will do an investigation, just so they can allay the fears of the public, and say everything is fine. So don't expect them to tell the truth. The FDA knows all about the dangers of aspartame. They tried to have the manufacturer indicted for fraud but the defense team hired both US prosecutors and the statute of limitations expired. When that didn't work they revoked the petition for approval: http://www.wnho.net/fda_petition1.doc Read how Don Rumsfeld got it on the market when the FDA said no. See the URL clip from the movie Sweet Misery: A Poisoned World. Notice one of the reasons the FDA revoked the petition for approval is that it caused brain tumors and brain cancer.

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NewsTarget.com
June 26 2006

A recent study by the California Department of Health Services indicates that industrial air pollutants may increase the risk of autism by 50 percent in young children and unborn babies. The report was published online in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives.

Researchers compared 959 children from six San Francisco Bay area counties who were born in 1994. Out of these, 284 were diagnosed with autism-spectrum disorders. The study showed that children with autism were more likely to be born in areas with high levels of mercury, cadmium, nickel, trichloroethylene and vinyl chloride. Elemental mercury -- which is released into the air from coal-burning power plants, chlorine factories and gold mines -- appears to be particularly hazardous.

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BBC NEWS:
June 26, 2006

Top European pharmaceutical firms are using unscrupulous marketing practices to promote their products, a consumer report says.

The Consumers International lobby group accused drugmakers of using the methods to get doctors to prescribe products and persuade consumers they need them.

It said there was a "shocking" lack of publicity about where the $60bn (£33bn) annual marketing spend went.

Drug firms say that they act within strict guidelines.

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