HerbalGram. 2005;65:46-49 © American Botanical Council
by Kenneth Jones
http://www.herbalgram.org

Purple corn is fast approaching classification as a functional food˜ an integral component of the diet that provides energy and essential nutrients. Researchers in the fields of food and nutrition are intensely searching for functional foods in almost every corner of the world and from a diversity of plants. Examples include purple corn (Zea mays L., Poaceae), green tea (Camellia sinensis [L.] Kuntze, Theaceae), soy isoflavones (Glycine max [L.] Merr., Fabaceae), various nuts, plus various other natural substances in the human diet containing antioxidant and other substances with alleged or proven potential disease-preventive properties.

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'40% of ADHD pupils' excluded

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Healthy Skepticism Library number: 6865
Publication type: journal article
Rayner C.
BBC News 2006 Oct 21

Notes:
Ralph Faggotter's Comments:

Children with behavioural difficulties at school have always existed, and were formerlly considered to be at one end of the normal behavioural spectrum of childhood behaviour. Now they have been redefined to have an illness, 'ADHD', which conveniently leads to the legitimization of the policy of giving them mind-altering drugs to control their behaviour. This enables the educational authorities and the parents to avoid confronting the root causes of the behaviour and the labour-intensive management which is required to help these kids to make their behaviour more socially acceptable in unnatural, constraining, environment of the school classroom.

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The ADHD dilemma for parents

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BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk
October 22, 2006
By Cordelia Rayner
All Out Productions

With a recent survey suggesting almost 50% of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder have been excluded at some point, parents face difficult choices.

Up to one in 20 children have ADHD, which affects concentration and can cause them to be disruptive.

Many are being put on medication but unions warn that some schools cannot meet their medical needs.

And American scientists have raised concerns about the widespread use of ADHD medications.

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Healthier respect for herbs

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Los Angeles Times
By Chris Kraul
Times Staff Writer
October 30, 2006

WHENEVER her son's arthritis becomes unbearable, Mery Aguilar heads to a stall in the Seventh of August farmers market, where she buys a big bag of flowers.

Then she boils the petals and buds of the borrachero and ruda plants, which grow wild in the Andes, and adds the brew to a hot bath that is her son's only salvation from debilitating pain.

"Sometimes," Aguilar said, "grandmothers' secrets are better than the doctors'."

The treatment for Aguilar's 29-year-old son was just one of dozens "prescribed" by Pilar Hernandez in her stall at the market on a recent overcast day. All involved plants from Colombia's rich array of native flora, among the most diverse in the world.

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NewsTarget.com
October 20 2006

(NewsTarget) According to a 70-week government study published in the November edition of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, popular attention deficit hyperactivity disorder drug Ritalin's side effects -- including stunted growth -- are more likely to affect preschoolers.

The scientists maintain that the drug benefits children with severe ADHD, and that the positive outcome of its use outweighs its drawbacks, but they also recommended close monitoring of preschoolers on the medication.

Preschoolers on the generic version of Ritalin, methylphenidate, showed slowed growth, increasing about a half-inch less in height and gaining 2 pounds less in weight than expected during the study. About 40 percent of children taking the drug developed side effects, and 11 percent of children dropped out of the study due to irritability, weight loss, insomnia, and other problems. Some children even reacted with severe behaviors including hanging from ceiling fans and playing with fire.

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Caspian Newsletter
http://www.spychips.com
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 23, 2006

CASPIAN Advises Consumers to Immediately Remove Cards from Wallets

Consumer watchdog group CASPIAN is demanding a recall of millions of RFID-equipped contactless credit cards in light of serious security flaws reported today in the New York Times. The paper reports that a team of security researchers has found that virtually every one of these cards tested is vulnerable to unauthorized charges and puts consumers at risk for identity theft.

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a controversial technology that uses tiny microchips to transmit information at a distance. These RFID microchips have earned the nickname "spychips" because the data they contain can be read silently and invisibly by radio waves without an individual's knowledge or consent. The technology has long been the target of criticism by privacy and civil liberties groups.

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NewsTarget.com
October 24 2006

(NewsTarget) A new study from researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has found that an antioxidant nutrient in strawberries may help improve memory and protect the brain from the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

The researchers found that fistein -- a flavonoid (plant chemical) found in strawberries -- improved the memory and mental function of mice. To test fistein's effects on memory, the researchers split healthy mice into two groups: The first received a single dose of fistein, and the second did not.

To test the animals' memory, the researchers presented the mice in each group with two objects. Each day, one object would be swapped for a new object of a different shape. Memory was tested by timing how long the mice spent on the new object versus the old object. The researchers found that the mice supplemented with fistein recalled the previous day's object more quickly than the control mice.

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NewsTarget.com
October 24 2006

(NewsTarget) The Australian government has established the National Collaboration on Trans Fats in order to reduce the presence of the harmful food ingredient, and one American health author is applauding Australia for protecting its citizens from the ingredient.

Trans fats are found in foods that contain hydrogenated oils, usually added to make fried food crisper, and has been linked to several health concerns including increased LDL (bad) cholesterol and an increase in heart disease risk. Denmark banned food with more than 2 percent trans fats two years ago, but thus far has been the only country to impose such a severe restriction.

The new Australian body will be made up of the National Heart Foundation of Australia, the Dietitians Association of Australia, the Australian Food and Grocery Council, and Food Standards Australia New Zealand, and promotes mandatory labeling of foods with trans fats. Currently, foods are only required to have trans fat content listed on the label if it claims to be "low in saturated fat" or have "no cholesterol."

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NewsTarget.com
October 24 2006

(NewsTarget) Antidepressant drug use could severely lower men's sperm counts, according to a case report presented at yesterday's American Society for Reproductive Medicine conference in New Orleans.

Dr. Peter Schlegel of the Cornell Medical Center in New York, along with a colleague, recently treated two men for infertility and found when both patients stopped taking their prescription antidepressant medications -- selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) -- their sperm counts dramatically increased. Schlegel then observed that when both men re-started their antidepressants, their fertility problems returned.

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NewsTarget.com
October 24 2006

(NewsTarget) A recent study notes the diabetes drug pioglitazone (Actos) has no clear-cut benefit for patients with type 2 diabetes, and may even be harmful to users.

The scientists analyzed data from 22 clinical trials involving 6,200 patients who were prescribed pioglitazone -- a member of the thiazolidinediones class of drugs, which theoretically increase the body's natural insulin supply -- for type 2 diabetes. The authors reported no evidence that the drug had a positive impact on patients, but they did note an increase in edema and heart failure among pioglitazone users.

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