Yes, Red Wine Holds Answer

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The New York Times
By NICHOLAS WADE
November 2, 2006

Yes, Red Wine Holds Answer. Check Dosage.

Can you have your cake and eat it? Is there a free lunch after all, red wine included? Researchers at the Harvard Medical School and the National Institute on Aging report that a natural substance found in red wine, known as resveratrol, offsets the bad effects of a high-calorie diet in mice and significantly extends their lifespan.

Their report, published electronically yesterday in Nature, implies that very large daily doses of resveratrol could offset the unhealthy, high-calorie diet thought to underlie the rising toll of obesity in the United States and elsewhere, if people respond to the drug as mice do.

Resveratrol is found in the skin of grapes and in red wine and is conjectured to be a partial explanation for the French paradox, the puzzling fact that people in France enjoy a high-fat diet yet suffer less heart disease than Americans.

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Why aren't we buying gum?

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Zoe Williams
November 1, 2006
The Guardian

The British gum market went down 6% last year and 5% the year before. Cadbury blames a lack of competition and believes that breaking into the market with its American brand, Trident, will help sales snap back.

I would dispute this reasoning. When I decide to buy slightly less of something, year on year, it is almost never because I'm thinking, "If only there were more choice! If only I wasn't staring down the barrel of the same old minty flavours!"

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Alternative Medicine
November / December 2006
By ALAN REDER

The Other Youth Drug Problem

Teaching our kids to "just say no" may keep them off street drugs, but what do we do when the schools, government, and pharmaceutical companies partner to push another kind of dangerous drug?

When 13-year-old Luisa (family names and location changed to protect identity) of Atlantic City, New Jersey, began complaining of stomachaches, her mother, Eva, did what a good mom does - drove her to the pediatrician. After an exam, the doctor agreed with Luisa that her stomach pain was likely caused by anxiety. He prescribed a psychiatric medicine, Zoloft, commonly given to adults to ease depression. When her parents asked about side effects, the doctor reassured them the drug was mild. "If she needed something strong, I would have sent her to a psychiatrist," he said.

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Crystal Lite HIGH

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Alternative Health and Nutrition

Dr. Janet Starr Hull:
www.janethull.com
October 31, 2006

Can you imagine discovering that your 12-year-old child is using dry, powdered forms of aspartame to get high? I recently received an email from a woman who discovered her daughter had been eating dry aspartame to get "high."

"I learned months ago," she wrote, "that a friend of my 12-year-old daughter had turned her on to ingesting Crystal Lite® (with aspartame) without water to get "hyper." I consulted with our doctors, called Poison Control, and met with school administrators to see if they were aware of this.

"The message I received," she continued, "was 'Crystal Lite is perfectly safe and the problem was most likely in their heads.'"

As a concerned parent, this mother has been researching aspartame ever since. "With the listed symptoms/side affects of aspartame on your website," she continued, "it is apparent to me that the children are getting some type of 'altered' sensation. I know my daughter experiences a rapid heart beat, dizziness, headaches and nausea, to name a few reactions she has described to me."

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Kiss My Aspartame

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Alternative Medicine forum
By JoAnn Guest
October 31, 2006

Claim: The artificial sweetener aspartame has been proven responsible for an epidemic of cancer, brain tumors, and multiple sclerosis

Example: [Collected via e-mail]

I have spent several days lecturing at the WORLD ENVIRONMENTAL CONFERENCE on "ASPARTAME marketed as 'NutraSweet', 'Equal', and 'Spoonful"'. In the keynote address by the EPA, they announced that there was an epidemic of multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus, and they did not understand what toxin was causing this to be rampant across the United States. I explained that I was there to lecture on exactly that subject.

When the temperature of Aspartame exceeds 86 degrees F, the wood alcohol ASPARTAME coverts to formaldehyde and then to formic acid, which in turn causes metabolic acidosis. (Formic acid is the poison found in the sting of fire ants). The methanol toxicity mimics multiple sclerosis; thus people are being diagnosed with having multiple sclerosis in error. The multiple sclerosis is not a death sentence, where methanol toxicity is.

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by Erica Orden
Special to Newsday
May 2, 2006
http://www.thenhf.com/fda_51.htm

To many people these days, simply sweetening a cup of coffee is practically akin to picking a poison. Sugar or honey? Too many calories. Equal or Nutrasweet? Too many health risks, especially given recent reports detailing diet soda's dangerously high levels of the cancer-causing compound benzene.

So to the sweet-toothed consumer, the increasingly popular, all natural, calorie-free substance called stevia sounds too good to be true. And to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, it is.

For the past 11 years, while artificial sweeteners like Splenda, Equal, and Nutrasweet have dominated the diet-conscious market, the Stevia industry and the FDA have been at odds over whether the additive poses health risks.

But with sales of the plant-based substance, indigenous to South America, growing rapidly in the past few years, Stevia's sticky situation is creating an increasingly complex marketplace for consumers, manufacturers and retailers.

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The Irish Times
October 31, 2006
Carl O'Brien, Social Affairs Correspondent

Almost 300 children and adolescents were admitted or detained in adult psychiatric hospitals last year because no other suitable facilities were available.

Children as young as nine have been placed in adult facilities, despite warnings from patients' groups and psychiatrists that the practice is adversely affecting children.

The official figures, seen by The Irish Times and due to be published in November, come on the eve of the full implementation of the Mental Health Act (2001), which aims to improve services for young people with psychiatric problems.

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Fatty Fish Fights Cancer

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CBS News.com
Sep 19, 2006
By Daniel DeNoon

(WebMD) Eating fatty fish — but not lean fish or shellfish — cuts women's risk of kidney cancer, a Swedish study shows.

A recent overview of all existing dietary studies recently found no proof that eating fish fights cancer. But that study didn't differentiate fatty fish — which are full of healthy omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D — from lean fish.

Alicja Wolk, DMSc, of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues looked at more than 15 years of data on 61,433 women aged 40 to 76. The women filled out food-frequency questionnaires.

Women who ate fatty fish at least once a week had a 44 percent lower risk of kidney cancer than those who ate no fish. Those who consistently ate lots of fatty fish over a 10-year period had a 74 percent lower risk of kidney cancer.

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U.S. Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
Drug and Chemical Evaluation Section,1995
http://www.blockcenter.com/pages/pages_news.asp#6

Methylphenidate (Ritalin®) - Overview

1. Ritalin is a Schedule II stimulate, structurally and pharmacologically similar to amphetamines and cocaine and has the same dependency profile of cocaine and other stimulants.

2. Ritalin produces amphetamine and cocaine-like reinforcing effects including increased rate of euphoria and drug liking. Treatment with Ritalin in childhood predisposes takers to cocaine's reinforcing effects.

3. In humans, chronic administration of Ritalin produced tolerance and showed cross-tolerance with cocaine and amphetamines.

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Washington Post.com
By Marc Kaufman
Washington Post Staff Writer
October 17, 2006

Lester M. Crawford, who resigned mysteriously last fall just two months after being confirmed as commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, will plead guilty today to charges that he hid his ownership of stock in food and drug companies that his agency regulated, his lawyer said.

The Justice Department charged Crawford yesterday with two misdemeanors for withholding the financial information, which included his ownership of shares in food and drink manufacturers Pepsico Inc. and Sysco Corp. and the drug company Embrex Inc.

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