Medical error death risk 1 in 300

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The Guardian, UK
Sarah Hall, health correspondent
Tuesday November 7, 2006

The risk of dying in hospital as a result of medical error is one in 300, Britain's most senior doctor warned yesterday.

Clinical misjudgments or mistakes mean that the odds of dying as a result of being treated in hospital are 33,000 times higher than those of dying in an air crash, according to the chief medical officer, Sir Liam Donaldson. "In an airline industry, the evidence ... from scheduled airlines is the risk of death is one in 10m. If you go into a hospital in the developed world, the risk of death from a medical error is one in 300," he said.

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NewsTarget.com
November 7 2006

(NewsTarget) Men who eat just one serving of salmon per week reduce their risk of developing prostate cancer by 43 percent, compared to men who do not consume fish, according to new research published in the online edition of the International Journal of Cancer.

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NewsTarget.com
November 7 2006

(NewsTarget) At a Friday meeting in New Delhi, the Bush administration won international approval for the use of a little more than 5,900 tons of ozone-destroying pesticide methyl bromide, despite the objections of European nations.

Nearly two years ago, methyl bromide was banned under international treaty except in critical cases, but after Friday, the U.S. farmers are exempt from the ban if the pesticide is used on tomatoes, strawberries and some other crops in agriculture-heavy states such as Florida and California.

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NewsTarget.com
November 6 2006

(NewsTarget) A group of 40 women who use a popular birth-control patch sued the patch's manufacturer this past Wednesday. The group claimed that the contraceptive caused serious illnesses -- and at least one death.

One lawsuit stipulates that 43 women suffered from blood clots and other health ailments after taking the Ortho Evra birth-control patch, currently one of the fastest-growing forms of contraception in the country. A second lawsuit states that Kelly Bracken, 25, died of severe blood clots in her lungs and legs after she began using the Ortho Evra patch.

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NewsTarget.com
November 6 2006

(NewsTarget) A federal appeals court recently rejected an attempt by the Bush administration to overturn a ruling that restricted the U.S. Navy's use of low-frequency active (LFA) sonar, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC).

Three years ago, the NRDC won a landmark federal case that put limitations on the Navy's use of LFA sonar, which was found to pose a serious threat to whales and other marine life.

Since losing its appeal, the Navy must stick to an agreement with the NRDC that limits its testing and training using LFA sonar to an area in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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MSNBC.com
The Associated Press
October 20, 2006

National trial is one of a growing number to look at natural treatments

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - A plant used widely in China is the focus of a national clinical trial that aims to see if it could help treat Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia.

The University of North Carolina Hospitals are participating in the national clinical trial on Chinese club moss, which is already being sold in stores with nutritional supplements and is used in China as a treatment for cognitive disorders.

The study, sponsored by the National Institute on Aging, is one of a growing number of federally funded research studies focused on natural and alternative therapies. The centers of the National Institutes of Health expect to spend $300.5 million in complementary and alternative medicine research in the 2007 budget year.

Even with the recent financial commitment, research in that area is limited, making it difficult for doctors to get information that is essential to understanding the risks and benefits of certain treatments.

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October 29, 2006
Contact: Rick Callender, President
(408) 406-5203 Phone

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE (NAACP) PRESS RELEASE
Says Foster Care Children should be protected from the financial incentives the Foster Care Industry receives for pushing psychiatric drugs on them.

OAKLAND, CA - Mr. Rick Callender, president of the San Jose Silicon Valley branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) submitted a resolution to the State NAACP Convention calling for an end to the profit-motivated practice of using psychiatric drugs on foster youth.

The resolution was unanimously passed today by the membership.

Several investigations into Foster Care have recently exposed how group-home "parents" request and administer psychotropic drugs on foster youth at far greater rates than any other population. Since 1999 State & Federal regulations provide a financial incentive for Group Homes and Foster Parents to use psychiatric drugs on these children. California's deranged foster-care system pays higher rates when young people are drugged for even the slightest sign of misbehavior or upset.

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By Stephen Foley in New York
November 5 2006

Drug company chiefs dig deep to get a result they like in the Senate

Executives at the UK's three biggest pharmaceuticals companies have been funnelling thousands of dollars from their personal fortunes to help the re-election campaigns of industry-friendly politicians in the US.

David Brennan, the chief executive of AstraZeneca, has emerged as one of the most generous donors to candidates in the midterm elections, in which drug prices have emerged as a big political issue. He and his wife have contributed a total of $31,000 (£16,000) to individual politicians and to Republican party schemes such as the Majority Initiative to Keep Electing Republicans.

Mr Brennan said he "supports candidates who recognise and value the importance of innovative medicines and innovative companies in enhancing people's health".

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Asthma: Nutritional Protocol

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Willner Chemists
Reference Library
www.willner.com

Fifteen million people suffer from asthma. Over six billion dollars are spent on asthma annually, with over one billion spent on medications alone.
But are these medications working? Are the side effects worse than the cure?
Dr. Richard Firshein believes there is a better answer, and his new book provides a detailed, alternative approach to treating asthma.
In one chapter, he provides information on the role of certain nutrients:

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Rethinking First Foods

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Time magazine
By PAMELA PAUL
Posted Sunday, Jun 11, 2006
www.time.com

Somewhere between mother's breast and the lunchroom, something has gone very wrong. How to instill good eating habits from the start

Too much sugar, too much fat, too many meals on the run and not enough vegetables or variety. Could it be that Americans' worst eating habits all take root in the high chair and stroller? Consider this: By age 2, according to a 2002 survey, 1 in 5 babies is eating candy every day. And the No. 1 vegetable for toddlers isn't pureed peas or carrots; it's French fries. Sounds a lot less like baby food and a lot more like, well, our own meals.

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