Natural chemical 'beats morphine'

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BBC News
November 14, 2006

The human body produces a natural painkiller several times more potent than morphine, research suggests.

When given to rats, the chemical, called opiorphin, was able to curb pain at much lower concentration than the powerful painkiller morphine.

The French team said their findings could be lead to new pain treatments.

But other scientists were unsure of the significance of the work, which is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The significance of these findings for pain control is.. still uncertain
john Wood, UCL

The researchers isolated the chemical in human saliva, although they believe it may also be present in other parts of the body.

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Vitamin C as a Cancer Fighter

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A Special HealthCheck Report
6abc.com
By Anita Brikman

November 8, 2006 - Millions of us start the day with orange juice, because it tastes good and because we think vitamin C is important for overall health.

A growing number of doctors think this essential vitamin could do a lot more. They are putting it directly into bloodstreams of patients to fight one of the deadliest diseases around.

When Donna Gudauskas of Cherry Hill learned she had early-stage colon cancer last December, she underwent surgery to take out the tumor. But the advertising representative did not want to have chemotherapy and radiation afterward.

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Shock Over Drugs Offer

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Shock Over Drugs Offer
Sky News
November 08, 2006

A mother has spoken of her shock after a doctor suggested her four-year-old daughter needed anti-depressants.

The GP suggested the drugs could be used to treat her anxiety at not going to the same primary school as her friends.

Mollie Murphy was taken to see her doctor after she began wetting the bed and vomiting because she was so distraught at missing her friends from nursery school.

Her mother, Victoria Anderson, 26, of Sunderland, said: "I thought how can a little girl suffer from that?

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November 10, 2006.
By Evelyn Pringle

USA: Prior to the arrival of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) on the market, depression was estimated to affect only 100 people per million.

And those 100 people per million sought help from a medical professional trained in psychiatry and the treatment of depression.

Since the introduction of SSRIs, rates for depression are now considered to be in the range of 50,000 to 100,000 cases per million, or between a 500 to 1,000 fold increase, according to The Marketization of Depression: The Prescribing of SSRI Antidepressants to Women, by Janet Currie, in the May 2005 journal Women and Health Protection.

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New Hope for Cataracts
Vitamin Research Products
Ward Dean, MD

Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness, accounting for about 42 percent of all cases of blindness worldwide (affecting about 17 million people). Twenty-eight thousand new cases are reported everyday. About 20 percent of all people over 60 have at least the beginning of a cataract in one or both eyes, and that figure rises to 80 percent for people over 75.

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By Jeremy Laurance
The Independent UK
Wednesday 08 November 2006

Chemical pollution may have harmed the brains of millions of children around the world in what scientists are calling a "silent pandemic".

The world is bathed in a soup of industrial chemicals which are damaging the intellectual potential of the next generation and may increase the incidence of conditions such as Parkinson's disease, they say.

One in every six children has a developmental disability, such as autism, attention deficit disorder or cerebral palsy, the effects of which may be life-long.

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November 9, 2006
By ANDREW BRIDGES
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON - Check your medicine cabinet: Millions of bottles of the widely used pain reliever acetaminophen, some sold as long as three years ago, are being recalled because they may contain metal fragments.

The recall affects 11 million bottles containing varying quantities of 500-milligram acetaminophen caplets made by the Perrigo Co. The pills were sold under store brands by Wal-Mart, CVS, Safeway and more than 120 other major retailers, the Food and Drug Administration said. At least one chain started pulling the pills from store shelves Thursday.

There were no immediate reports of injuries or illness. The contaminated pills had metal fragments ranging in size from "microdots" to portions of wire one-third of an inch long, the FDA said. The FDA could not describe further the type of metal.

Perrigo discovered the metal bits during quality-control checks done after the company discovered its equipment was wearing down prematurely, the FDA said. Agency officials declined to say whether the metal found in the pills caused the damage or resulted from it.

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Therapeutic Benefits of Olive Oil

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mediterraneandiet.gr
November 9, 2006

The health and therapeutic benefits of olive oil were first mentioned by Hippocrates, the father of medicine. For centuries, the nutritional, cosmetic and medicinal benefits of olive oil have been recognized by the people of the Mediterranean.

Olive oil was used to maintain skin and muscle suppleness, heal abrasions, and soothe the burning and drying effects of sun and water. Olive oil was administered both internally, and externally - for health and beauty.

Recent research has now provided firm proof that a Mediterranean diet, which includes olive oil, is not only generally healthy, but that consuming olive oil can actually help lower harmful LDL cholesterol.

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27 October 2006
Exclusive from New Scientist
newscientist.com
Jessica Marshall
Peter Aldhous

They are supposed to be grassroots organisations representing the interests of people with serious diseases. But Drummond Rennie, professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and deputy editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association, believes that some patient groups are perilously close to becoming extensions of pharmaceutical companies' marketing departments. "There's a crisis here," he contends.

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BBC News
http://news.bbc.co.uk
November 7, 2006

Toxic chemicals may be causing a pandemic of brain disorders because of inadequate regulation, researchers say.

A report in the Lancet identifies over 200 industrial chemicals, including metals, solvents and pesticides, which have potential to damage the brain.

Studies have shown low-level exposure of some can lead to neurobehavioral defects in children, the US and Danish team behind the report said.

UK experts remained divided over the findings.

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