The New York Times
November 17, 2006
By NICHOLAS WADE

A drug already shown to reverse the effects of obesity in mice and make them live longer has now been shown to increase their endurance as well.

Experts say the finding may open up a new field of research on similar drugs that may be relevant to the prevention of diabetes and other diseases.

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By Liz McIntyre & Katherine Albrecht
November 17, 2006
NewsWithViews.com

Election Bid Raises Specter of RFID Implant Threat

Former U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy Thompson is considering a run for president in 2008, a move that should spark alarm among those familiar with Thompson's calls for widespread RFID chipping of Americans. The authors of "Spychips," Dr. Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre, who closely monitor the RFID industry, caution that his position on the Board of the VeriChip Corporation and his stock options in the company make Thompson one of the most dangerous figures in American politics today.

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Vaccine death: maker quizzed

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Evening telegraph and post
31 October 2006

The Procurator Fiscal’s office in Dundee, investigating the death of a woman following her devastating reaction to a flu jab, is seeking answers from the German pharmaceuticals company that made the vaccine (writes Bruce Robbins).

Depute fiscal Kirsty McGowan said the firm has been asked if it is aware of any other adverse reactions to the vaccine.

Dundee woman Sylvia Thomson suffered a fatal reaction to the injection in November last year and died a few weeks later, on December 2,.

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The Vancouver Sun
November 13, 2006
Sharon Kirkey
CanWest News Service

In 'cholesterol paradox,' heart failure patients with higher levels fared better

In what scientists are calling a "cholesterol paradox," new research is linking low cholesterol with a higher death rate in people with heart failure -- the opposite of what researchers expected.

A study of 10,701 patients with suspected heart failure found those with low cholesterol were 1.7 times more likely to die within 12 weeks of being hospitalized than people with normal cholesterol.

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Heart Risk Seen in Drug for Anemia

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The New York Times
nytimes.com
November 16, 2006
By ALEX BERENSON

A medical study to be released today suggests that high doses of a best-selling drug used to treat anemia in dialysis and cancer patients may increase the risk of heart problems and deaths.

Almost a million Americans a year receive prescriptions for the drug, known as epoetin, or darbepoetin, a closely related drug also used in anemia treatment. Worldwide, sales of the two drugs — sold under the brand names Epogen, Procrit and Aranesp — topped $9 billion last year for Amgen and Johnson & Johnson, their makers.

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MERCURY MADNESS - FDA STILL IN DENIAL

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Elissa Meininger
November 7, 2006
NewsWithViews.com

The Dental Amalgam Issue
“a terrible sin against humanity”
--Dr. Alfred Stock, 1926

Some months ago, I learned that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was going to stage another hearing about the safety of dental amalgam (aka mercury) fillings scheduled for September 6 and 7, 2006. Immediately, like thousands of other victims of mercury poisoning who had monitored the last major FDA hearing in 1991, I wondered if this time the hearing would be objective, or if we would experience the same attempt to cover up what we all knew was a major health crisis fifteen years ago.

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Radiation Causes Bone Loss

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Cancer Decisions Newsletter Archives
cancerdecisions.com
October 29, 2006
By Ralph Moss, PhD

The scientific world has been shaken by a report from Clemson University that a single therapeutic dose of radiation can cause appreciable bone loss. Senior author Ted Bateman, PhD, a professor of bioengineering, and his South Carolina colleagues showed that when mice were given a dose of just two Gy (two gray, a radiation dosage formerly designated as 200 rads), between 29 and 39 percent of their interior bone mass was destroyed.

It did not particularly matter which kind of radiation the mice were exposed to. Gamma rays, protons, high-speed carbon and iron nuclei all had a similar and markedly destructive effect. Dr. Bateman and his colleagues reached these figures by creating 3D computer scans of the spongy interior of the bones and then calculating how much bone mass these irradiated mice had lost compared to a control group.

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Health warning antibacterial soaps

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November 14, 2006
By Dr. Ben Kim
http://drbenkim.com

antibacterial soap Triclosan bad for health

If you are still using antibacterial soap that contains a compound called triclosan, I hope that a brilliant study published in the journal, Aquatic Toxicology will persuade you to consider switching to the plainest bar of soap that you can find.

Researchers have discovered that exposure to triclosan can cause significant disruption to the endocrine system, a finding that has countless and serious health implications.

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Vitamin D The Antibiotic Vitamin

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Science News Online
Week of Nov. 11, 2006; Vol. 170, No. 20
By Janet Raloff

Deficiency in vitamin D may predispose people to infection

In April 2005, a virulent strain of influenza hit a maximum-security forensic psychiatric hospital for men that's midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles. John J. Cannell, a psychiatrist there, observed with increasing curiosity as one infected ward after another was quarantined to limit the outbreak. Although 10 percent of the facility's 1,200 patients ultimately developed the flu's fever and debilitating muscle aches, none did in the ward that he supervised.

"First, the ward below mine was quarantined, then the wards on my right, left, and across the hall," Cannell recalls. However, although the 32 men on his ward at Atascadero (Calif.) State Hospital had mingled with patients from infected wards before their quarantine, none developed the illness.

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By Byron J. Richards, CCN
November 12, 2006
NewsWithViews.com

Last week Americans sent a warning shot into the oversized belly of the Republican Party. Unfortunately for President Bush, Americans turned out not to be the zombies he was counting on. This week Bush is trying to figure out why his public health goons forgot to double the fluoride content in the drinking water prior to the elections. Even Hitler knew this was the best way to make a population docile.

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