Fridge magnets 'can be a killer'

| | Comments (0)

BBC News/Health
December 1, 2006

Fridge magnets and decorative jewellery could be a killer if you have a weak heart, experts warn.

A strong type of magnet used in many new commercial products can interfere with pacemakers and implanted heart devices with deadly consequences.

Close contact - within about 3cm - with a neodymium magnet is enough to destabilise these life-saving heart devices, Heart Rhythm journal reports.

The authors suggest manufacturers include a health warning on products.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

An Epidemic No One Understands

| | Comments (1)

New York Times
Second Opinion
By DENISE GRADY
November 28, 2006

When our first son developed asthma as a 3-year-old, my husband and I felt pretty much blindsided. We were only a little less shocked when the same thing happened to our second son, at the same age.

The disease turned out to be tenacious, and for years both boys needed inhalers or a nebulizer machine several times a day to prevent asthma attacks that could keep them up half the night, coughing and wheezing.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

NewsTarget.com
November 29 2006
by Jessica Fraser

(NewsTarget) Breast cancer patients who are treated with both surgery and chemotherapy may suffer from brain shrinkage that can affect memory and cognition, according to a new Japanese study appearing in the Jan. 1 issue of the journal Cancer.

Women who undergo adjuvant chemotherapy -- chemo used in conjunction with another treatment; usually surgery -- to treat breast cancer often experience a phenomenon called "chemobrain" during treatment. Patients who experience "chemobrain" complain of memory and cognition problems.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

NewsTarget.com
November 29 2006
by Jessica Fraser

(NewsTarget) The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced last week that it has deregulated a genetically engineered variety of rice that contaminated the U.S. rice supply over the summer.

The rice -- a special long-grain variety created by Bayer CropScience called LL601 -- invaded non-genetically modified crops in nearby fields after Bayer abandoned its test plots in 2001. Bayer applied for approval of LL601 with the USDA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shortly after the contamination was reported in August.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Concern at nutrition in hospitals

| | Comments (1)

BBC News
November 30, 2006

Hospital food needs to be more nutritious, according to a watchdog.

The Audit Scotland report said patients were not routinely screened for poor nutrition, and claimed this should be a priority for the NHS.

The research also suggested catering services had improved over the past three years and patients were now being offered a greater choice of food.

The Scottish Executive said it was working on new nutritional standards, which NHS caterers will have to meet.

  • Currently 5/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 5/5 (1 votes cast)

USA TODAY
By Liz Szabo
November 29, 2006

Doctors once dismissed complaints of "chemobrain," a common side effect of cancer therapy in which patients experience memory problems or mental fuzziness.

Research now shows that chemotherapy can cause real changes in the brain, ranging from forgetfulness to seizures, vision loss and even dementia. More than 80% of cancer patients develop memory and concentration problems, according to a study in June from the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Chemo drugs 'destroy brain cells'

| | Comments (0)

BBC News
November 30, 2006

Drugs used to destroy cancer cells may actually be more harmful to healthy cells in the brain, research suggests.

A team from New York's University of Rochester found several types of key brain cell were highly vulnerable to the drugs.

They say it might help explain side effects such as seizures and memory loss associated with chemotherapy - collectively dubbed 'chemo brain'.

The research, on mice, is published in the Journal of Biology.

Drug therapy for cancer can prompt a wide range of neurological side effects, even the onset of dementia.

But they were thought not to be directly linked to the drug treatment itself.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

NewsTarget.com
November 27 2006
by Ben Kage

(NewsTarget) Experts have long recommended folic acid for pregnant women or women who may become pregnant, but a new study by researchers at the Wolfson Institute for Preventive Medicine in London and the Barts & The London Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Dentistry has confirmed the B vitamin also reduces people's risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

NewsTarget.com
November 27 2006
by Jerome Douglas

(NewsTarget) Hard recreation drugs are being passed up many drug abusers in favor of prescription narcotics like morphine and OxyContin, according to a new study across seven Canadian cities.

A recent research report states that heroin continues to be the number-one illegal drug across cities such as Vancouver and Montreal, but cities such as Edmonton, Toronto, Quebec City and Fredericton continue to witness drug abuse from prescription opioids and other prescribed drugs.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Did this Phone Mast give me cancer?

| | Comments (0)

Omega-News
By David Johnson
November 8, 2006

Families living within feet of a phone mast say it is to blame for 27 deaths and illnesses in their streets in the past 13 years.

Now residents are spending hundreds of pounds trying to protect themselves from radiation.

They are lining their lofts with tin foil, putting up metal mesh curtains and installing specialist windows.

They want the 82-foot Orange-owned antenna in Shooters Hill, Stoke-on-Trent - which collects and distributes signals from other masts - to be torn down.

They say the microwaves from the mast are potentially lethal.

Mother-of-two Karen Owens, pictured, aged 40, who lives 300 feet from the mast, has just had a mastectomy after contracting cancer.

  • Currently 0/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rating: 0/5 (0 votes cast)

Health Supreme News

Loading...
Powered by Movable Type 5.13-en

Receive updates

Subscribe to get updates of this site by email:

Enter your Email


Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz

Recent Comments

Other sites of ours