By Byron J. Richards, CCN
December 5, 2006
NewsWithViews.com

Today I received an e-mail from the Natural Products Association (NPA) asking me to support the Dietary Supplement and Non-Prescription Drug Consumer Protection Act (the “AER bill”). Apparently they do not know I am one of the most outspoken critics of this legislation. I have already posted two articles on this topic for NWV, one in July and one in November. The NPA, formerly the NNFA (National Nutritional Foods Association), is the largest trade association for ingredient suppliers and health food stores. This group, along with CRN (the Council for Responsible Nutrition) has been taken over by Big Pharma and is selling out the supplement industry.

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Alzheimer's and Dementia

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Baseline of Health Foundation
December 4, 2006
By Jon Barron

Well, it looks like Alzheimer's is set to become our next big medical terror. In the early 1900's it was infectious diseases. From 1950 to around 1975, it was heart disease; and then from the mid 70's to pretty much now, it's been cancer. But rising rapidly in our consciousness as it makes regular appearances on popular TV shows from Boston Legal to Grey's Anatomy, Alzheimer's looks ready to take its place as our new collective nightmare. So what is Alzheimer's? What do we know about it? What can we do about it?

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Nutrausa
ingredients.com
By Stephen Daniells
November 27, 2006

Regular consumption of the antioxidant rich green tea could reduce blood lipid levels and cut the risk of developing heart disease, suggests a small trial from Portugal.

The results, which suggest a heart-healthy benefit for the tea, add to an ever-growing body of science linking consumption to a wide range of health benefits, including lower risk of certain cancers, weight loss, and protection against Alzheimer's.

Such benefits have mainly been put down to the polyphenol content of the tea. Green tea contains between 30 and 40 per cent of water-extractable polyphenols, while black tea (green tea that has been oxidized by fermentation) contains between 3 and 10 per cent.

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By Jessica Fraser
www.newstarget.com
December 4, 2006

(NewsTarget) The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced last week that it has deregulated a genetically engineered variety of rice that contaminated the U.S. rice supply over the summer.

The rice -- a special long-grain variety created by Bayer CropScience called LL601 -- invaded non-genetically modified crops in nearby fields after Bayer abandoned its test plots in 2001. Bayer applied for approval of LL601 with the USDA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shortly after the contamination was reported in August.

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By Jessica Fraser
NewsTarget.com
December 4, 2006

(NewsTarget) Industrial chemicals are hindering children's development, lowering IQ scores and triggering attention and behavior disorders, according to a new study by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health.

The study, published in The Lancet, warns that 201 chemicals that can have neurotoxic effects on the public -- and on children in particular -- lack sufficient safety regulation. According to the study's lead author, Dr. Philippe Grandjean, such chemicals are causing "a silent pandemic in modern society," and millions of children may have already been affected by exposure to industrial toxins.

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c/net news.com
http://www.news.com/
By Declan McCullagh
December 1, 2006

The FBI appears to have begun using a novel form of electronic surveillance in criminal investigations: remotely activating a mobile phone's microphone and using it to eavesdrop on nearby conversations.

The technique is called a "roving bug," and was approved by top U.S. Department of Justice officials for use against members of a New York organized crime family who were wary of conventional surveillance techniques such as tailing a suspect or wiretapping him.

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The New York Times
nytimes.com
December 4, 2006
By ALEX BERENSON

The news came to Pfizer’s chief scientist, Dr. John L. LaMattina, as he was showering at 7 a.m. Saturday: the company’s most promising experimental drug, intended to treat heart disease, actually caused an increase in deaths and heart problems. Eighty-two people had died so far in a clinical trial, versus 51 people in the same trial who had not taken it.

Within hours, Pfizer, the world’s largest drug maker, told more than 100 trial investigators to stop giving patients the drug, called torcetrapib. Shortly after 9 p.m. Saturday, Pfizer announced that it had pulled the plug on the medicine entirely, turning the company’s nearly $1 billion investment in it into a total loss.

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Online Journal/Health
By Richard A. Warner
Online Journal Contributing Writer
Nov 29, 2006

Under the guise of combating the stigma of mental illness, the U.S. government will soon begin a massive campaign of psychiatric indoctrination, designed to increase the acceptance of psychiatric chemical imbalance theories and labeling, and to pave the way for national psychiatric screening, driving more Americans into seeking psychiatric drug treatment.

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By Beldeu Singh
December 1, 2006

According to the HIV theory of AIDS, the virus is sexually transmitted and that should produce an HIV-AIDS explosion in the heterosexual population within 25 years. But it did not happen.

This point is well put forth by Dr. Robert Root-Bernstein. Female prostitutes often have 200-300 sexual partners per year and are therefore assumed to have much higher rates of exposure to HIV and AIDS than the vast majority of heterosexuals. Many AIDS researchers assumed that female prostitutes would be the vectors (or means of transmission) of HIV and AIDS to the heterosexual community based on the fact that a single HIV-infected intravenous drug user or bisexual man could infect one female prostitute, who in turn could infect dozens or perhaps even hundreds of non-drug using heterosexual men. These men could, in turn, infect their other sexual partners, and an explosion of HIV and AIDS could occur among people without any obvious risk for AIDS. Paradoxically, no heterosexual epidemic has occurred and no evidence of female prostitutes transmitting HIV or AIDS into the heterosexual community exists for any Western nation. Transmission almost always seems to be drug related. In fact, sexual acquisition of HIV and AIDS among female prostitutes themselves is almost unknown in the absence of concomitant intravenous drug use. Cell-free viral particles have never been found directly in semen. In 'American Journal of Epidemiology' (Vol. 146, No.4), Nancy S. Padian et al reported:

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Los Angeles Times
By Thomas H. Maugh II
Times Staff Writer
December 1, 2006

Findings that it can kill cells and cause areas to shrink lend support to patients' reports of feeling mental effects.

Cancer chemotherapy can impair the brain, killing crucial neural cells and causing key parts of the organ to shrink, according to two studies released this week.

The new findings add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that "chemo brain" — the mental fuzziness, memory loss and cognitive impairment often reported by cancer patients but often dismissed by oncologists — is a serious problem.

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