Shane Ellison M. Sc.
January 4, 2007
NewsWithViews.com

If there were a contest for the best example of total disregard for human life the victor would be McNeil Nutritionals ? makers of Splenda™. Manufacturers of Vioxx™ and Lipitor™ would tie for a very distant second.

McNeil Nutritionals is the undisputed drug-pushing champion for disguising their drug Splenda™ as a sweetener. Regardless of its drug qualities and potential for side-effects, McNeil is dead set on putting it on every kitchen table in America. Apparently, Vioxx™ and Lipitor™ makers can’t stoop so low as to deceptively masquerade their drug as a candy of sort. There is no question that their products are drugs and by definition come with negative side-effects. Rather than sell directly to the consumer, these losers have to go through the painful process of using doctors to prescribe their dangerous goods.

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Parents back radiotherapy refusal

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BBC News
21 December 2006

The parents of an eight-year-old girl with a rare kidney cancer are backing what they say is her decision to stop her treatment.

Leah-Beth Richards, from Beddau near Pontypridd, has been battling Wilms Tumour since she was two.

Now, her family say, she does not want any more radiotherapy and they are fighting any pressure to continue.

Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust said it acts only in patients' best interests but will not treat without consent.

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TeenScreen Video, view here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RfU9puZQKBY and pass the word!

In less than 24 hours that video has received "4 honors" in YouTube lingo:
#14 - Top Favorites (Today) - News & Blogs - English
#16 - Top Favorites (Today) - News & Blogs - All
#58 - Top Rated (Today) - News & Blogs - All
#64 - Most Viewed (Today) - News & Blogs - All

TMAP Video - view here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kPlVs6TKoQ

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Part 2
By Byron J. Richards, CCN
December 18, 2006
NewsWithViews.com

In the middle of the night the House passed a bill at the conclusion of the lame duck session known as Adverse Event Reporting legislation for dietary supplements (S.3546). The bill was pushed through the Senate and the House by Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT), also known as the Hatch-et-man. Many Congressional leaders were hoodwinked by Hatch to back the bill, as he passed around letters of various trade organizations to imply the bill had wide support amongst stakeholders (it does not). Others were most likely bribed with threats to hold other legislation hostage in the Senate unless Hatch-et-man’s bill was passed in the House.

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High vitamin D levels cut MS risk

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BBC NEWS:
December 20, 2006

Higher levels of vitamin D in the blood may lower the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), research suggests.

Previous studies have suggested vitamin D may have a protective effect - but the evidence has been inconclusive.

A Harvard School of Public Health team measured levels of the vitamin in large numbers of US military personnel.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, found the risk of MS fell as blood levels of the vitamin rose.

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By ALEX BERENSON
Published: December 17, 2006

The drug maker Eli Lilly has engaged in a decade-long effort to play down the health risks of Zyprexa, its best-selling medication for schizophrenia, according to hundreds of internal Lilly documents and e-mail messages among top company managers.

The documents, given to The Times by a lawyer representing mentally ill patients, show that Lilly executives kept important information from doctors about Zyprexa’s links to obesity and its tendency to raise blood sugar — both known risk factors for diabetes.

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Playing Down the Risks of a Drug

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The New York times
nytimes.com
EDITORIAL
December 19, 2006

It was bad enough when studies showed that the newest and most heavily promoted drugs for treating schizophrenia weren’t worth their high cost. Now the disturbing tale of their excessive use has taken a tawdry turn with revelations that Eli Lilly, a pharmaceutical giant, has consistently played down the risks of its best-selling antipsychotic drug, Zyprexa, and has promoted it for unapproved uses.

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The New York Times
nytimes.com
December 18, 2006
By ALEX BERENSON

Eli Lilly encouraged primary care physicians to use Zyprexa, a powerful drug for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, in patients who did not have either condition, according to internal Lilly marketing materials.

The marketing documents, given to The New York Times by a lawyer representing mentally ill patients, detail a multiyear promotional campaign that Lilly began in Orlando, Fla., in late 2000. In the campaign, called Viva Zyprexa, Lilly told its sales representatives to suggest that doctors prescribe Zyprexa to older patients with symptoms of dementia.

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Christopher Barr
Naturally Speaking
December 18, 2006

Mourning freedom's early morning loss

Does this nation have a war on drugs or are drugs at war with this nation? This question concluded last week’s column. The answer was clearly given by Congressional cowards while most all of America slept after 3 a.m. in the early morning hours of 12/09/06.

Late in the evening of the day that last week’s column was written there was a bill passed stealthily by the United States Senate without a vote being taken. This was accomplished through a parliamentary maneuver that was also a paramilitary maneuver for the war of drugs against this nation.

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InfoGM press release
14 December 2006.

Carcassone, France -- In a judgment issued on 13 December, the Correctional Tribunal of Carcassone sentenced the directors of Monsanto subsidiary Asgrow, Serge Reymond and Jean-Bernard Bonastre, to a € 15,000 fine for the placing on the market of non-authorised GMOs.

Tests carried out by France's General Directorate for Fair Trading, Consumer Affairs and Fraud Control detected the presence of unauthorised GMOs in bags of seeds imported by Asgrow on 13 April 2000. The follow-up investigation proved the company's executives knew about the contamination in their products since at least December 1999.

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