Source: newstarget.com
March 5, 2007
Originally published December 4 2006
by Ben Kage

EPA uses nanotech regulation ploy to target colloidal silver while ignoring all other nanotech particles

Nanomaterials -- products and materials changed or created at the atomic and molecular level -- are quickly gaining popularity for their multitude of uses, and while the Environmental Protection Agency is preparing to regulate popular nanosilver antibacterial products, ostensibly to protect consumers, critics say the move is a thinly veiled attempt to solely regulate nanosilver as a health supplement.

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The Wall Street Journal
By Anna Wilde Mathews
March 3, 2007; Page A1

The Food and Drug Administration has bungled its effort to build a new system for detecting the side effects of medicines after they go on the market, delaying its implementation by at least four years, according to a report commissioned by the agency itself.

As a result, the agency must continue to rely on its existing "dysfunctional" computer system as a primary tool for tracking the safety of medications sold in the U.S., according to the November 2006 report, which hasn't been made public.

The situation is "frustrating and undermining...the post-marketing drug safety work" of its staff "because they lack some of the basic tools they need to perform their jobs, e.g. a computing system that meets their requirements," says the report. It was prepared by the Breckenridge Institute, a research and consulting firm in Breckenridge, Colo.

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The Sydney Morning Herald
Justin Norrie in Tokyo
March 1, 2007

JAPANESE health authorities are investigating a flu medicine that is also available in Australia after a teenager jumped 11 storeys to his death after taking the drug. It was the 18th juvenile fatality linked to Tamiflu in 17 months.

The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has asked the Japanese importer of Tamiflu, an anti-viral drug regarded as the most important shield against bird flu in humans, to collect information about the conditions of patients who take the drug.

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Washington Post
By Rick Weiss
March 2, 2007

The Agriculture Department has given a preliminary green light for the first commercial production of a food crop engineered to contain human genes, reigniting fears that biomedically potent substances in high-tech plants could escape and turn up in other foods.

The plan, confirmed yesterday by the California biotechnology company leading the effort, calls for large-scale cultivation in Kansas of rice that produces human immune system proteins in its seeds.

The proteins are to be extracted for use as an anti-diarrhea medicine and might be added to health foods such as yogurt and granola bars.

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In June 2006, the FDA approved a new vaccine from Merck for the prevention of cervical cancer, which is thought to be caused by the Human Papilloma Virus. Under a new 'rapid approval' process, it took the FDA only 6 months to complete the evaluation of the vaccine and authorize it for the market.

"This vaccine is a significant advance in the protection of women's health in that it strikes at the infections that are the root cause of many cervical cancers," said Andrew C. von Eschenbach, MD, then Acting Commissioner of Food and Drugs, according to an FDA statement on the approval of this new vaccine.

Despite lingering doubts as to the exact genesis of cervical cancer, and despite a distinct lack of evidence that the vaccine will indeed be a useful preventive tool, Merck lobbied heavily to make the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine mandatory for girls all over the United States. Texas governor Rick Perry's move to make the vaccine mandatory in his state drew heavy criticism, not to mention allegations that pharma money may have played a role in making this decision.

The rush to mandate an HPV vaccine to prevent Cervical Cancer, may not even make sense as a preventive measure. Is Human Papillomavirus the Real Cause of Cervical Cancer? Gary Krasner thinks there may be other causes and that vaccinating every girl would be a waste, if not a danger because the real cause - antibacterial douches that tend to destroy the natural balance of flora in the vagina - tends to get covered up.

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NewsTarget.com
February 28 2007
by Mike Adams

The latest round in conventional medicine's ongoing attempts to discredit (and ultimately outlaw) nutritional supplements is found in a highly questionable study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which claims that vitamins actually increase the risk of death.

The study claims to have analyzed a collection of previous studies on Vitamin A, beta carotene, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and selenium, concluding that most of the nutrients are actually dangerous to human health. Of course, this is research from conventional medicine – an industry that promotes patented chemicals as perfectly safe, even though FDA-approved pharmaceuticals are killing 100,000 Americans each year. (Imagine the uproar if vitamins killed even a fraction of that number…)

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In These Times
By Terry J. Allen
February 27, 2007

Merck launched its new cervical cancer vaccine with a major advertising and lobbying blitz, and pushed to make the drug mandatory for all 11- to 12- year-old girls. Cervical cancer, caused by the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), affects 10,000 women in the United States every year, and kills 3,700. The toll is far greater in the developing world, where women lack diagnostic Pap tests.

Gardasil may well be what Merck claims: a lifesaving vaccine that protects against key HPV strains without any significant side effects. Because the drug is most effective on unexposed populations, the FDA recommends vaccinating girls as young as nine — before they are sexually active.

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Taking back the FDA

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THE BOSTON GLOBE
February 26, 2007
By Marcia Angell

IT'S TIME to take the Food and Drug Administration back from the drug companies. Before a prescription drug can be sold, the manufacturer must conduct clinical trials to prove to the FDA that the drug is safe and effective. Without that, doctors have no way of knowing how good or bad a drug is. Just trying it out would be not only risky, but unreliable, since individual experience can be misleading. The scrutiny that this agency exists to provide is vital to our health.

But in 1992, Congress put the fox in the chicken coop. It passed the Prescription Drug User Fee Act, which authorizes drug companies to pay "user fees" to the FDA for each brand-name drug considered for approval. Nearly all of the money generated by these fees has been earmarked to speed up the approval process.

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23 YEARS OF DOCUMENTED VITAMIN SAFETY

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Orthomolecular Medicine News Service
February 27, 2007

(OMNS, Feb 27, 2007) Over a twenty-three year period, vitamins have been connected with the deaths of a total of ten people in the United States. Poison control statistics confirm that more Americans die each year from eating soap than from taking vitamins.

Where are the bodies?
A 23-year review of US poison control center annual reports (1) tells a remarkable and largely ignored story: vitamins are extraordinarily safe.

Annual deaths alleged from vitamins:

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The New York Times
February 27, 2007
By ALEXEI BARRIONUEVO

VISALIA, Calif., Feb. 23 — David Bradshaw has endured countless stings during his life as a beekeeper, but he got the shock of his career when he opened his boxes last month and found half of his 100 million bees missing.

In 24 states throughout the country, beekeepers have gone through similar shocks as their bees have been disappearing inexplicably at an alarming rate, threatening not only their livelihoods but also the production of numerous crops, including California almonds, one of the nation’s most profitable.

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