Alliance for Human Research Protection
AHRP
March 18, 2007
By Vera Hassner Sharav

The Washington Post reports that "a new trend" in organic harvesting is underway within minutes of cardiac arrest. This government sanctioned program euphemistically called, "donation after cardiac death" (DCD) accelerates the organ "donation" process.

"Some doctors and bioethicists, however, say the practice raises the disturbing specter of transplant surgeons preying on dying patients for their organs, possibly pressuring doctors and families to discontinue treatment, adversely affecting donors' care in their final days and even hastening their deaths."

"The person is not dead yet," said Jerry A. Menikoff, an associate professor of law, ethics and medicine at the University of Kansas. "They are going to be dead, but we should be honest and say that we're starting to remove the organs a few minutes before they meet the legal definition of death."

In Denver, surgeons at Children's Hospital wait 75 seconds before starting to remove hearts from infants.

The number of these "donations" more than doubled from 268 in 2003 to at least 605 in 2006, enabling surgeons to transplant more than 1,200 additional kidneys, livers, lungs, hearts and other organs. "It's starting to go up exponentially," said James Burdick, who leads organ-donor efforts at the federal Department of Health and Human Services.

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Washington Post
By Margarita Bauza
Detroit Free Press
March 20, 2007

As Internet blogging spreads across professions, doctors' observations and opinions about patients -- some expressed in graphic detail -- are now ending up on the Web for all to see.

Hundreds of doctors across the country are writing Internet diaries that sometimes include harsh judgments of patients, coarse observations and distinct details of some cases.

Medical blogging is so new that medical boards, schools and professionals disagree on what is acceptable. Critics say the blogs cross into an ethical gray area and threaten patient privacy while posing liability risks for health workers and their employers.

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In July 2006 the British Medical Journal (BMJ) published a highly defamatory article alleging that Dr Matthias Rath, a leading vitamin researcher, was standing trial in a German court for “fraud” in relation to the death of a young cancer patient. The BMJ’s article also discredited Dr Rath and the effect of treatments which result from his research in the field of natural control of cancer.

None of these allegations were true.

Because the biased nature of the article clearly had only one benefactor - the multi-billion pound market for pharmaceutical cancer drugs, including chemotherapy - Dr Rath felt that he had no option but to file a lawsuit against the BMJ seeking a retraction, an apology and payment of damages for the harm done by its publication.

In September 2006, after a British judge stated that these false accusations were among the severest possible, the BMJ finally published a full retraction of the article and an apology to Dr Rath.

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NewsWithViews.com
By Joyce Morrison
March 18, 2007

Henry is a good man - the kids all love him. He picks out kids that often go unnoticed and gives them special attention. They are not the prettiest or most popular children, but he always gives them a pat on the back and words of encouragement.

Many of these young people would like to participate with livestock projects in 4-H and FFA, but they don’t have livestock. Henry takes a lot of pride in his herd of cross-bred cattle, and he also takes a lot of pride in seeing kids grow up to be good citizens. He gives these “special kids” the opportunity to use one of his herd animals as their project and if they work hard, they can show the animal in competition at the county fair. Without Henry, the lessons learned about responsibility and pride in achievement would never happen.

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http://apnews.myway.com
March 17, 2007

CHICAGO (AP) - A 2-year-old Indiana boy and his mother contracted a rare and life-threatening infection from his soldier father's smallpox vaccination, according to a published report.

The boy and his mother were being treated in a specially ventilated room at the University of Chicago's Comer Children's Hospital, the Chicago Tribune reported Saturday.

The family's name and home town were not released at their request.

The boy developed a virulent rash over 80 percent of his body earlier this month after coming in contact with his father, who had recently been vaccinated for smallpox before he was to be deployed overseas by the Army, the paper said.

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Betty Martini
Mission Possibile International
www.wnho.net
www.dorway.com
March 19, 2007

Dear Dr. Adamson:

Why did NSDA, file a protest against the approval of aspartame for soft drinks, then turn around and lobby for NutraSweet? NSDA's stunning protest is in the Congressional Record S 5507 - 5511, May 7, 1985
http://www.wnho.net/congressional_record1.doc

Now you say that after this protest you interrogated the G. D. Searle Co., and the answers they gave assured you everything is fine. Please send me a copy of the questions and the answers which made you change your mind.

How do you repudiate the detailed and damning objections NSDA wrote against aspartame which fill 6 pages of the Congressional Record? For instance, NSDA said: "An important decomposition product of aspartame, aspartic acid, cannot be detected at all using TLC." Did Searle go back and use the right test, HPLC, high pressure liquid chromatography instead of TLC, thin layer chromatography? Did they not want their testing to detect aspartic acid because as an isolate its an excitotoxin (product that stimulates the neurons of the brain to death causing brain damage)?
http://www.wnho.net/aspartame_brain_damage.htm

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Los Angeles Times
By Lianne Hart
March 19, 2007

An unusually high number are washing up along Texas' Gulf Coast this calving season for unknown reasons.

GALVESTON, TEXAS — An unusually large number of dead bottlenose dolphins have washed ashore near this Gulf of Mexico city in the last month, and investigators are looking at laboratory slides, satellite photos and anything else they can think of in their search for clues.

About 180 dolphins are stranded in Texas each year, many from January through March — their calving season, when infants may die during birth or become separated from their mothers and are unable to survive alone.

The 47 bodies found recently included many newborns with umbilical cords still attached. That is three times the number found during the same period last year.

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Too many drugs 'not child tested'

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BBC NEWS:
February 2, 2006

Too many children's drugs have not been properly tested, a report says.

The House of Lords said 90% of medicines for new born babies and 50% of those aimed at children are untested after collating evidence from doctors.

The warning comes after the EU proposed a law requiring firms producing adult drugs to test if they can also be used to treat children.

The Lords report said the EU plan was right, but care must be taken on drafting the guidelines for testing.

We need to ensure maximum safety for children's drugs. Equally it is difficult to conduct the very clinical trials on children needed to improve safety
Andrew Lansley, shadow health secretary

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Daily Mail
by ISLA WHITCROFT
March 15, 2007

After years of shattering cancer therapy, this little girl says she's had enough - and so does her mother. But doctors refuse to stop treating her. So who's right?

As Leah Beth Richards lay sobbing in her bed, her mother Kathryn could hardly bear to look at the pitiful little scrap that her once lively, happy daughter had become. The eight-year-old had been the picture of health, dashing about on her quad bike, enjoying horse riding and playing with the other children in the close-knit Welsh community of Beddau, north of Cardiff.

She loved school, her terrier Charlie and following her older sisters around. But, after seven months of gruelling cancer treatment following surgery to remove a massive stomach tumour (the third in her short life), Leah Beth was at breaking point.

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Timesonline
March 12, 2007
Nigel Hawkes, Health Editor

The drug trial that left six young men seriously injured was poorly designed and possible risks had not been taken fully into account, a report by the Royal Statistical Society has concluded. The trial, at Northwick Park in northwest London, went disastrously wrong when a drug codenamed TGN 1412, being tested on human beings for the first time, produced horrifying effects, triggering a violent reaction from the six volunteers’ immune systems that caused extensive organ damage.

The society set up an expert committee to review the trial. It concludes that it had major defects, some of which could have been anticipated. Giving six volunteers doses of the drugs without a sufficient interval between them to assess ill-effects was the most serious error.

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