http://www.nytimes.com
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
April 12, 2007

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A painkiller proposed as a successor to Vioxx should not be approved, a panel of federal health advisers overwhelmingly recommended Thursday.

The nonbinding 20-1 vote was on the prescription drug Arcoxia, made by Merck & Co., Inc.

A Food and Drug Administration drug safety expert had told the panel the drug may increase substantially the risk of stroke and heart attack and is no more effective for pain relief than other medicines in the same class.

''What you're talking about is a potential public health disaster,'' Dr. David Graham told the outside experts before the vote. Graham was a leading critic of Vioxx, a related drug also known as rofecoxib.

''We could have a replay of what we had with rofecoxib,'' Graham said.

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NBC11.com
HEALTH
April 12, 2007

Drug May Raise Risk Of Stroke, Heart Attack, Scientist Says

WASHINGTON -- A federal drug safety expert is raising red flags about a painkiller proposed as a successor to Vioxx.

Food and Drug Administration scientist Dr. David Graham said the new drug, called Arcoxia, may substantially increase the risk of stroke and heart attack.

He also said it does not provide any more pain relief than other drugs in its class.

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12 April 2007
New Scientist
Aria Pearson

If true, it could turn the conventional wisdom of how obesity causes diabetes on its head. Emerging evidence suggests that pollutants stored in body fat may be contributing to the ongoing rise of type 2 diabetes.

While obesity is still thought to be a major cause, there is more and more evidence to suggest that persistent organic pollutants (POPs) also play a key role.

POPs are synthetic chemicals that can accumulate in the fatty tissue of animals. Many POPs - such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which were used as coolants in electrical equipment, and pesticides such as DDT - have been banned in developed countries, but they remain in the food chain and often end up in people.

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Prison Planet
Paul Joseph Watson
April 10, 2007

GM, toxic chemicals, chemtrails destroying eco-system, threatening very survival of humanity

The alarming decline in bee populations across the United States and Europe represents a potential ecological apocalypse, an environmental catastrophe that could collapse the food chain and wipe out humanity. Who and what is behind this flagrant abuse of the eco-system?

Many people don't realize the vital role bees play in maintaining a balanced eco-system. According to experts, if bees were to become extinct then humanity would perish after just four years.

"If the bee disappeared off the surface of the globe then man would only have four years of life left. No more bees, no more pollination, no more plants, no more animals, no more man," said Albert Einstein.
Others would say four years is alarmist and that man would find other food sources, but the fact remains that the disappearance of bees is potentially devastating to agriculture and most plant life.

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NBC11.com
April 9, 2007

Forskolin Flushes Out Hidden Infections

A study at Duke University says that a common herbal extract could greatly reduce urinary tract infections and boost antibiotics' power against the bacteria that cause them.

Encyclopedia: What Are Bladder Infections?

Researchers studying mice found that forskolin, an exract from the Indian coleus plant, kills bacteria that can hide in the bladder's lining, leading to reinfections.

The researchers said in a news release that about 90 percent of urinary tract infections in the bladder are caused by E. coli. Women are four times as likely to have them.

"After customary antibiotic treatment, the vast majority of the bacteria are either killed by the antibiotics or eliminated during urination," Abraham said. "However, there are small numbers of bacteria that survive antibiotic treatment because they sneak into the lining of the bladder, waiting for the opportunity, after antibiotic treatment, to come out and start multiplying again," said author Soman Abraham.

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Exclusive from New Scientist
April 3, 2007
Debora Mackenzie

"This thing has immense potential for social and human destruction." Startling words - but spoken by the father of the Green Revolution, Nobel laureate Norman Borlaug, they are not easily dismissed.

An infection is coming, and almost no one has heard about it. This infection isn't going to give you flu, or TB. In fact, it isn't interested in you at all. It is after the wheat plants that feed more people than any other single food source on the planet. And because of cutbacks in international research, we aren't prepared. The famines that were banished by the advent of disease-resistant crops in the Green Revolution of the 1960s could return, Borlaug told New Scientist.

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OpEdNews.com
April 4, 2007
By Evelyn Pringle

Drug makers are hell-bent on recovering the antidepressant customer base represented by women of childbearing years. With doctors now reluctant to prescribe the drugs to pregnant women, a new recruitment scheme has cropped up. Screening programs are being set up all over the country to screen every pregnant woman for mental disorders.

The name-brand selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants, or SSRIs, with a stake in this controversy, include Paxil, by GlaxoSmithKline; Zoloft, from Pfizer; Prozac by Eli Lilly;
Celexa and Lexapro, from Forest Laboratories; and Luvox, from
Solvay.

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By Byron J. Richards, CCN
April 5, 2007
NewsWithViews.com

Americans are up in arms that our pets are being injured and killed by a toxin sent to America by a Chinese company. Melamine, a toxic fertilizer used in China, is the suspected culprit behind the deaths and injuries to potentially hundreds of thousands of our pets. The FDA assures us that this toxin has not entered the human food supply – does anyone believe in the competence of the FDA? It is only a matter of time before this type of problem happens to humans, as the inept FDA has no control over imported food intended for humans, let alone pets.

Melamine was used to help grow wheat, a practice that is legal in China and illegal in the U.S. This poison ended up in wheat gluten used as a protein source and thickening agent in pet food. Why were all these pet food companies, many claiming to be producers of fine quality pet food, buying wheat gluten from China when the U.S. is one of the top producers of wheat in the world? These companies sacrificed the health of your pet to make a profit, buying the cheapest source of wheat gluten they could find. This is the new way of the global economy, find the cheapest price and forget about health implications.

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PHYSORG.com
April 4, 2007

While nicotine is highly addictive, researchers have also shown the drug to enhance learning and memory—a property that has launched efforts to develop nicotine-like drugs to treat cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, schizophrenia, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

A key problem in designing such drugs has been that little was known about the detailed mechanism by which nicotine exerts its learning-enhancing effects.

Now, researchers have discovered important details of how nicotine adjusts the signaling properties of neuronal wiring to enhance memory. Such signaling properties include the strength of the connections by which one neuron triggers another. Huibert Mansvelder and colleagues reported their findings in the April 5, 2007, issue of the journal Neuron, published by Cell Press.

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BBC NEWS
April 3, 2007

Air pollution may be a bigger risk to health than exposure to radiation, such as that after the Chernobyl disaster, a study suggests.

Researchers examined the health impact of the meltdown of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, and the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945.

They concluded the risks were probably no greater than those posed by obesity, smoking and urban pollution.

However, a radiation expert cast doubt on the BMC Public Health research.

I'm not sure that it helps to compare the health risks from radiation among survivors of the atomic bombings in Japan with the risks from obesity or smoking -Dr Michael Clark, Health Protection Agency

He said the risks posed by radiation were not comparable to those from other sources.

Researcher Dr Jim Smith, from the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, said exposure to radiation took fewer years off life expectancy than heavy smoking or severely obese.

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