NewsTarget.com
April 18 2007
by Mike Adams

The Chicago Tribune reports that Cho Seung Hui, the Virginia Tech shooter who killed 32 fellow students in a shooting rampage, was taking antidepressant drugs. This is not the first time a school shooting rampage has been linked to antidepressants. The infamous Colombine High shootings took place almost exactly eight years ago, and the shooters in that rampage were also -- you guessed it -- taking antidepressant drugs.

What is it about antidepressant drugs that provokes young men to pick up pistols, rifles and shotguns, then violently assault their classmates? Clearly, there's something wrong with the mind of anyone who engages in such violent acts. Could the drugs be "imbalancing" their minds, priming them for violence?

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Indian herbal remedy cancer hope

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BBC NEWS:
April 17, 2007

An Indian herbal remedy could one day be used to help fight pancreatic cancer, scientists hope.
A team at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute found extracts of triphala slowed the growth of human pancreatic tumours grafted onto mice.

The findings, presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, offer hope that one day a treatment might be developed.

But experts have warned the research is still at a very early stage.

Triphala triggered the cancerous cells to die off and significantly reduced the size of the tumours
Professor Sanjay K Srivastava

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ADHD: too many kids on drugs?

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The Herald
By Ann Donald
April 16, 2007

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Scotland is currently under scrutiny. This June sees the publication of the first part of an audit from NHS watchdog Quality Improvement Scotland (QIS) into the care and treatment of Scottish children with difficulties of attention, concentration and impulsivity.

Meanwhile, at an international conference about ADHD held at Edinburgh University last month, neurologist Baroness Susan Greenfield warned of the potentially harmful long-term effect of drugs commonly used to treat ADHD on the developing brains of young children.

This is particularly pertinent given the 10-fold increase from 1996 to 2004 in Scottish prescriptions for methylphenidate - the generic name for the psychoactive drug widely known as Ritalin.

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Dr. Morando Soffritti of the European Ramazzini Foundation will present the results of a new study confirming the carcinogenicity of Aspartame on April 23, 2007 at the Mount Sinai Medical School of New York, where he also will receive the prestigious Irving J. Selikoff Award.

Aspartame, the artificial sweetener made by Searle/Monsanto was found to cause cancer in laboratory animals already in the original studies that were submitted to the FDA when approval was asked to put it on the market. The justified doubts of the FDA's scientists were overridden when Donald Rumsfeld called in his political markers.

Another study conducted in Spain by Trocho et al came to similar results, identifying a transformation of parts of the molecule into formaldehyde as a probable cause. Later, a study of the European Ramazzini Foundation confirmed the sweetener's carcinogenicity in laboratory rats and seriously questioned its safety. But industry, through the European Food Safety Authority, succeeded in diverting attention from the damaging findings, calling them an artifact of the study's design. But the Ramazzini Foundation stuck to its guns and announced another long-term study (now concluded) to look into the sweetener's adverse effects.

Now that this new long-term study has been completed with lower dosages but confirming, once again, the carcinogenicity of the sweetener, the jig may be up - how can a cancer-causing additive remain on the market?

Here is the announcement from the Ramazzini Foundation and a comment about the FDA's list of Aspartame's adverse effects from Betty Martini:

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New aspartame data to be presented at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in NYC, USA
A second study conducted by the European Ramazzini Foundation (ERF) confirms the carcinogenicity of aspartame. The results of this study will be presented April 23, 2007 at the Mount Sinai Medical School of New York, where ERF Scientific Director Morando Soffritti will receive the third Irving J. Selikoff Award. [vedi testo completo per l'italiano]

Aspartame is an artificial sweetener consumed by hundreds of millions of people worldwide. It is used in over 6,000 diet products including soft drinks, chewing gum, candy, desserts, yogurt as well as in pharmaceuticals, in particular, syrups and antibiotics for children. In 2005, the European Ramazzini Foundation published important experimental data demonstrating the carcinogenicity of aspartame. These data demonstrated for the first time that aspartame is a carcinogenic agent, inducing various types of malignant tumors in rats, even at dose levels currently considered acceptable for humans.

As soon as carcinogenic effects were perceived during this first study, the ERF began a second long term experiment, administering aspartame at low doses in feed to rats beginning during fetal life.

In a world exclusive, Italian news station TG2 announced on April 13th that the European Ramazzini Foundation will present the results of this second study at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine at the end of April when Scientific Director Dr. Morando Soffritti will receive the third Irving J. Selikoff Award. The news story may be viewed at: http://www.raiclicktv.it/raiclickpc/secure/list_content_tg.srv?id=1986#

Source: http://www.ramazzini.it

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CNNMoney.com
By Aaron Smith
April 4 2007

Amid mounting competition and a backlash against Big Pharma's aggressive sales tactics, drug reps are looking more and more like an endangered species.

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- It's hard out there for drug sales reps--particularly if they work in places where gaining access to doctors is becoming increasingly difficult.

Take Boston. Glenn Abrahamsen, senior director of global analytics for drug company Schering-Plough (up $0.14 to $25.56, Charts), says the city is full of medical groups with formal policies restricting the access that company reps have to individual doctors.

"We weren't allowed to leave samples: not tissue boxes or anything," said Abrahamsen, speaking at iiBig conference in Atlantic City, N.J. late last month "We weren't allowed past the receptionist."

Such "closed door" policies are now common around the country, especially in Washington, Minnesota and Wisconsin, according to anecdotal evidence from drug sales reps and medical groups.

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CVBT
MERCED
April 12, 2007
by Ching Lee

• Beekeepers baffled, farmers worried

• Colony collapse disorder now found in 24 states, Canada

Beekeepers nationwide are opening their hives and finding them empty, a baffling phenomenon that has researchers scratching their heads and farmers worrying about their crops.

The bees are mysteriously vanishing and no one is sure why. Instead of thriving colonies, beekeepers say they're typically finding only a queen and a few attendants left -- but no trace of the other bees, not even their bodies.

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As many may know, aspartame is on the market illegally. It's adulterated as discussed by the National Soft Drink Assn (now American Beverage) and in the congressional record. Because you cannot ship an adulterated product for sale it, therefore, violates Interstate Commerce. Dr. Adrian Gross, FDA toxicologist, told Congress that aspartame violated the Delaney Amendment which forbids putting anything in food that caused cancer in animals. www.wnho.net/whopper.htm It's also a drug, an addictive excitoneurotoxic carcinogenic drug that interacts with all drugs and vaccines, and is masquerading as an additive. Additives by law must be inert or non-reactive. Inert products do not produce a list of 92 documented symptoms from 4 types of seizures to coma and death, nor necessitate a 1038 page medical text. (Aspartame Disease: An Ignored Epidemic, H. J. Roberts, M.D., www.sunsentpress.com or 1 800 827 7991.) Nor would consumers using this product need to be detoxed. "What To Do If You Have Used Aspartame" by neurosurgeon Russell Blaylock, M.D., www.wnho.net/wtdaspartame.htm

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AHRP
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
April 12, 2007

The Los Angeles Times has spent more than a year chronicling lapses in the nation's organ transplant system. Below is a report by investigative reporters, Charles Ornstein and Tracy Weber.

They found problems that resulted in the closure of individual programs in California, as well as failings by those charged with regulating transplantation nationally. It also explored how organs are distributed, including the role geography plays in the wait times for new livers and how a patient's age may one day prevent him from receiving a kidney.

Our Infomail last month about the harvesting of organs from the "not-yet-dead" elicited several rebukes from doctors who called the Infomail "sensationalist" http://ahrp.blogspot.com/2007/03/us-organ-harvesting-in-not-yet-dead.html

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April 12, 2007
Computerworld
Marc L. Songini

Governor wants a balance between technology, privacy

As expected, North Dakota has become the second state in the U.S. to ban the forced implanting of radio frequency identification (RFID) chips in people.

The two-sentence bill, passed by the state legislature, was signed into law by Gov. John Hoeven last Wednesday. Essentially, it forbids anyone from compelling someone else to have an RFID chip injected into their skin. The state follows in the steps of Wisconsin, which passed similar legislation last year.

"We need to strike a balance as we continue to develop this technology between what it can do and our civil liberties, our right to privacy," Hoeven said in an interview. He emphasized that the law doesn't prohibit voluntary chipping. Military personnel who want an RFID chip injected so they can be more easily tracked will still be allowed to get a chip. There are also potential uses for the technology in corrections or in monitoring animals, he noted.

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