PhysOrg.com
May 14, 2007

A walk in the country is an effective alternative to chemical anti-depression treatment, a leading mental health charity said Monday, calling on British doctors to prescribe outdoor activities.

The Mind charity said so-called "ecotherapy" could help millions of people with mental health problems after two studies it commissioned suggested it could have significant benefits for sufferers in most cases.

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PHYSORG.com
May 15, 2007

Individuals who have higher dietary intake of foods with omega-3 fatty acids and higher fish consumption have a reduced risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration, while those with higher serum levels of vitamin D may have a reduced risk of the early stages of the disease, according to two reports in the May issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.

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NewsWithViews.com
By Byron J. Richards, CCN
May 15, 2007

Your right to have free access to safe and highly effective dietary supplements is under an intense multi-pronged FDA attack. On May 14, 2007 the Supreme Court sided with the FDA by deciding not to hear the case of Nutraceutical v FDA, letting stand a federal appeals court ruling that permits the FDA to use drug-related risk/benefit analysis to determine if a nutrient is safe. This is the exact same point the FDA is trying to get put into law through Senate bill S.1082 and HR.1561, which consumers have flooded the Senate on over the past few weeks. And it is the same point the FDA is seeking to help implement on an international basis through Codex. The Supreme Court denial to hear this case is a dramatic turn of events that means there is very little time left to act to preserve free access to dietary supplements. The first part of this article explains this issue in depth so that Americans can understand what is taking place. The second part explains the steps Americans need to take to preserve their health freedom.

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rense.com
Jeff Rense
May 10, 2007

Note - This is likely the biggest non-surprise 'study result' of the last 50 years. The vile, despicable commercial food industry has been POISONING hundreds of millions of children and destroying the lives of many of them for decades...with total, leering impunity. There has never been any question that these chemicals and 'additives' approved as 'safe' by the hideously corrupt Monsanto/Big Pharma/Factory Farming/AMA-dominated FDA - and the FSA in the UK - are toxic, life-altering, life-destroying POISONS.

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The Independent
May 13, 2007
By Marie Woolf and Geoffrey Lean

'IoS' report on the dangers of electronic smog from wireless technology examined by ministers

Ministers are to investigate arrangements for erecting mobile phone masts in the light of growing fears that they may cause cancer and other diseases because of "electronic smog".

They will review the exceptionally favourable rules that allow mobile phone companies to escape normal planning regulations and stop councils from considering the effects of the masts on health, even when they are sited near homes and schools.

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NewScientist
May 11, 2007
Roxanne Khamsi

Overzealous doctors who order unnecessary body scans that use X-ray technology are placing their patients at risk of cancer, radiologists warn.

Radiation from such scans is in some cases equivalent to that received by some survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, they say. In response, hospitals and professional associations, such as the American College of Radiologists, are taking new steps to promote more careful use of scanning technologies.

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Vitamin D 'may help ward off TB'

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BBC News
May 13, 2007

A dose of vitamin D may help ward off tuberculosis, research suggests.

A study of 131 people found the vitamin helped to boost the ability of the body to inhibit the growth of bacteria that causes the respiratory disease.

Researchers from Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Imperial College said it could be used to target at-risk patients or added to drinks.

The study appeared in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Vitamin D was originally used to treat TB in sanatoriums before antibiotics came in to use.

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Polly Curtis, health correspondent
May 14, 2007
Guardian.co.uk

Levels of suicide and self-harming are soaring in mental health wards where there are few activities, locked wards and constant surveillance, according to a major study.

Patients are self-harming and even attempting suicide because of the "prison-like" conditions they are kept in according to the evaluation of over acute psychiatric wards.

The idea that patients already suffering acute mental problems are being bored into self-harming and even suicide prompted calls for an urgent overhaul of the way wards are managed.

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The New York Times
May 10, 2007

When Anya Bailey developed an eating disorder after her 12th birthday, her mother took her to a psychiatrist at the University of Minnesota who prescribed a powerful antipsychotic drug called Risperdal.

Created for schizophrenia, Risperdal is not approved to treat eating disorders, but increased appetite is a common side effect and doctors may prescribe drugs as they see fit. Anya gained weight but within two years developed a crippling knot in her back. She now receives regular injections of Botox to unclench her back muscles. She often awakens crying in pain.

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Science daily
May 7, 2007

Science Daily — The growing premature birth rate in the United States appears to be strongly associated with increased use of pesticides and nitrates, according to work conducted by Paul Winchester, M.D., professor of clinical pediatrics at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He reports his findings May 7 at the Pediatric Academic Societies' annual meeting, a combined gathering of the American Pediatric Society, the Society for Pediatric Research, the Ambulatory Pediatric Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

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