NaturalNews.com
March 11, 2008
by Rami Nagel

(NaturalNews) People of the world, the US Government is planning to poison more than two million people, in California, using an untested biological "pesticide" this summer. The chemical to be sprayed is classified by the EPA as a "pesticide" and the plan is to douse cities with this chemical designed to stick on everything for 90 days or longer. This application is not a one time event, but will continue every 1-3 months for as long as five years. The pesticide to be sprayed is not designed to harm the light brown apple moth's who it is designed for, but merely to confuse its mating habits. While harmless to moths, the pesticide has been documented to harm humans.

Side effects range from vomiting and flu like systems, to male and female reproductive cycle disruption. One child nearly died from the exposure, and some people have developed asthma from being exposed to this chemical concoction. It is cause for alarm that a chemical being labeled as harmless and "safe" even in minute doses, causes severe health effects in some people. The government is racing to cover up and hide the dangerous health effects so that they can continue their aerial spray plans this summer. Your attention and action on this subject is needed in the most important way.

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Sott.net
By Luke Baker
March 7, 2008

LONDON - A British company has developed a camera that can detect weapons, drugs or explosives hidden under people's clothes from up to 25 meters away in what could be a breakthrough for the security industry.

The T5000 camera, created by a company called ThruVision, uses what it calls "passive imaging technology" to identify objects by the natural electromagnetic rays -- known as Terahertz or T-rays -- that they emit.

The high-powered camera can detect hidden objects from up to 80 feet away and is effective even when people are moving. It does not reveal physical body details and the screening is harmless, the company says.

The technology, which has military and civilian applications and could be used in crowded airports, shopping malls or sporting events, will be unveiled at a scientific development exhibition sponsored by Britain's Home Office on March 12-13.

"Acts of terrorism have shaken the world in recent years and security precautions have been tightened globally," said Clive Beattie, the chief executive of ThruVision.

"The ability to see both metallic and non-metallic items on people out to 25 meters is certainly a key capability that will enhance any comprehensive security system."

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Xenophilia
March 10, 2008

This is in the news today but see the 2001 article on Salon.

A vast array of pharmaceuticals — including antibiotics, anti-convulsants, mood stabilizers and sex hormones — have been found in the drinking water supplies of at least 41 million Americans, an Associated Press investigation shows.

To be sure, the concentrations of these pharmaceuticals are tiny, measured in quantities of parts per billion or trillion, far below the levels of a medical dose. Also, utilities insist their water is safe.

But the presence of so many prescription drugs — and over-the-counter medicines like acetaminophen and ibuprofen — in so much of our drinking water is heightening worries among scientists of long-term consequences to human health.

In the course of a five-month inquiry, the AP discovered that drugs have been detected in the drinking water supplies of 24 major metropolitan areas — from Southern California to Northern New Jersey, from Detroit, Michigan, to Louisville, Kentucky.

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AP News
the raw story
MARILYNN MARCHIONE
March 5, 2008

Government Concedes Vaccines May Have Injured Georgia Girl; Impact on Autism Claims Is Unclear

Government health officials have conceded that childhood vaccines worsened a rare, underlying disorder that ultimately led to autism-like symptoms in a Georgia girl, and that she should be paid from a federal vaccine-injury fund.

Medical and legal experts say the narrow wording and circumstances probably make the case an exception — not a precedent for thousands of other pending claims.

The government "has not conceded that vaccines cause autism," said Linda Renzi, the lawyer representing federal officials, who have consistently maintained that childhood shots are safe.

However, parents and advocates for autistic children see the case as a victory that may help certain others. Although the science on this is very limited, the girl's disorder may be more common in autistic children than in healthy ones.

"It's a beginning," said Kevin Conway, a Boston lawyer representing more than 1,200 families with vaccine injury claims. "Each case is going to have to be proved on its individual merits. But it shows to me that the government has conceded that it's biologically plausible for a vaccine to cause these injuries. They've never done it before."

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March 4, 2008
www.eu-referendum.org

Six non-governmental organizations (NGOs), collectively representing consumers from all 27 European Union (EU) countries, today announced the official launch of a campaign for citizens to have the right to vote in referendums whenever significant changes to laws affecting them are made at either national or European level. In particular, they are demanding that all EU citizens should immediately be given the opportunity to vote in referendums on the Lisbon Treaty.

Arguing that the EU is increasingly favouring the interests of big business over those of its own citizens, the six organizations say that unless this situation is reversed and European citizens are given the right to be directly involved in political decision-making, the European political system will rapidly degenerate into a dictatorship where democracy, freedom of choice and the privacy rights of individuals are routinely violated.

Paul Anthony Taylor, External Relations Director of the Dr. Rath Health Foundation and the campaign’s coordinator, said: “Last November, for the thirteenth year in a row, the EU’s auditors refused to sign off its financial accounts citing errors of legality and presumed attempts at fraud. Then, only two weeks ago, EU politicians were openly accused of fraud and embezzlement on a massive scale and an official investigation was launched that could potentially lead to the imprisonment of a number of MEPs. Corruption, fraud and an overall lack of accountability are becoming increasingly rife amongst the European Union’s political elite and it is clearly time that ordinary citizens are given a direct say in the way that the EU is developing. Simply giving people one vote every four or five years - to elect their political representatives - is not nearly enough in any political system that still professes to be a democracy.”

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The International Herald Tribune
March 3, 2008
by Doreen Carvajal

Paris, France - Thousands of garments in the sprawling men’s department at the Galeria Kaufhof are equipped with tiny wireless chips that can forestall fashion disaster by relaying information from the garment to a dressing-room screen.

The garments in the department store, in Essen, Germany, contain radio frequency identification chips, small circuits that communicate by radio waves through portable readers and more than 200 antennas that can not only recommend a brown belt for those tweed slacks but also track garments from the racks, shelves and dressing rooms on the store’s third floor.

This pioneering pilot project of the Metro Group, a retail chain in Germany, heralds a shopping experience of the future in which dress shirts can wirelessly offer accessorizing tips to shoppers. But the rapid development of RFID technology is also being regarded cautiously by the authorities in the European Union, who are moving quickly to establish privacy guidelines because the chips - and the information being collected - are not always visible.

Their goal is to raise awareness among consumers that the data-gathering chips are becoming embedded in their lives - in items like credit cards, public transportation passes, work access badges, borrowed library books and supermarket loyalty cards.

There are also policy concerns regarding whether retailers could link a customer’s credit card data to an RFID tag in a product, allowing clients to be identified when they return to a store.

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Healthy News Service
March 1, 2008

EC investigators are carrying out raids on the offices of drug companies around Europe. The raids began in January, and the companies aren’t given any advance notice in case executives destroy sensitive documents.

Astonishingly, the raids have been prompted by a general sense of mistrust of the drugs industry rather than by a specific allegation. In other words, they are sure the pharmaceuticals are doing something wrong even if they don’t know what it is.

European competition commissioner Nellie Kroes is co-ordinating the raids in the name of antitrust laws, although she has admitted she has not received any specific allegations.

As industry commentator Andrew Jack put it: “Instead of being viewed as heroic providers of the latest life-saving medicines, drug companies seem often to be viewed as 19th century snake oil salesmen.”

Suspicions have been fuelled by the knowledge that the drugs industry is heading for a major crunch, with many top-selling drugs losing their patent protection soon. This year blockbusters such as Fosamax, Effexor, Keppra and Risperdal lose their patents, which means their market becomes immediately open to generic, copycat drugs that are also often cheaper. GlaxoSmithKline has already warned of a 7 per cent drop in earnings this year.

(Source: British Medical Journal, 2008; 336: 418-9).

Provided by What Doctors Don't Tell You on 3/1/2008

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Daily Mail
Geoffrey Lean
February 27, 2008

Next time you hear a starling sing, stop and listen hard. It may well be warning of a peril that endangers the whole world of nature - and the very future of the human race itself.

For scientists have found that gender-bender chemicals - increasingly contaminating the environment, our food, our water and our bodies - are having a bizarre effect on common birds, causing the males to give voice to longer and more complex songs.

This is only the latest in a long series of increasingly urgent alarms being sounded by wildlife against an insidious but devastating danger that threatens our children.

But so far our leaders have steadfastly and scandalously turned a deaf ear to them - and, even more shamefully, ignored the first signs that the peril is already affecting birth patterns, causing thousands of babies who should have been boys to be born as girls instead.

Starlings and their diverse, complicated and mimicking - though not beautiful - songs have long fascinated humanity.

Mozart was entranced by a starling after it copied a tune that the great composer was whistling in a pet store.

Modern scientists have discovered that starlings' songs contain similar patterns to human speech.

But if we could, indeed, understand what they are communicating, we would be wise to take heed.

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Hawaii Reporter
Freedom to Report Real News
By Betty Martini
February 26, 2006

HONOLULU, HI - A blazing epidemic ravages the planet. Everywhere are reports of the disabled and dying. There are 92 symptoms, seizures, comas, sexual dysfunction, death are listed by the FDA. Medical texts by eminent doctors define the causation and delineate a preventive to stop the slaughter. Thousands of case histories and dozens of peer reviewed studies by top professionals and research institutions confirm the source of the sickness, a sweet addictive toxin poisoning our foods and beverages: aspartame/NutraSweet/Equal.

But Government intransigently refuses to protect the people since big money is involved. Let people die, the profits of the poisoners must be protected, whatever the cost to citizens. The political influence and bottomless checkbooks of the producers overwhelm reason and evidence.

It's tobacco Redux. Nicotine murders millions, an endless rampage powered by greed, addiction and profit. But nicotine is known as a killer and its adult users are aware of it. Aspartame is in children's vitamins, even vaccines, plus thousands of prepared foods and "diet" products. No "Warning, this product includes a deadly poison" labels tell gum chewers and cola drinkers that they're putting death in their mouth. No warning for pregnant women aspartame causes birth defects.

So it will continue in Hawaii. On Monday the Senate Bill 2506 to ban aspartame was "deferred". Senator David Ige and the committee decided that FDA has this responsibility.

James Turner, renowned consumer attorney fought the approval of aspartame with world famous neuroscientist Dr. John Olney and explained: "The toxicity of this deadly carcinogen is well known. The FDA not only refused to approve aspartame for years, but asked the Department of Justice to indict G.D. Searle, the manufacturer, for submitting fraudulent test reports to get the poison approved.

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The Independent
By Jeremy Laurance
February 27, 2008

The pharmaceutical industry came under assault from senior figures in medical research yesterday over its practice of withholding information to protect profits, exposing patients to drugs which could be useless or harmful.

Experts criticised the stranglehold exerted by multinational companies over clinical trials, which has led to biased results, under-reporting of negative findings and selective publication driven by the market, which was worth £10.1bn in the UK in 2006, amounting to 11 per cent of total NHS costs.

The latest attack was triggered yesterday by an analysis of published and unpublished trials of modern antidepressants, including Prozac and Seroxat, showing they offer no clinically significant improvement over placebos (dummy pills) in most patients. But doctors said patients on the drugs should not stop taking them without consulting their GPs.

It was the first time researchers - from the UK, Canada and the US - had successfully used freedom of information legislation to obtain all the data presented to regulators when the companies applied to license their drugs. In some cases it had not been made public for 20 years. Over the past two decades the drugs, known as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), have been among the biggest selling of all time, earning billions of pounds for their makers. Yesterday's finding suggests that the money may have been misspent. Drug companies are required by law to provide all data on a drug, published and unpublished, to the regulatory authorities when applying for a licence. But this requirement does not apply to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice), which assesses cost effectiveness and recommends which drugs should be used by the NHS.

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