SOTT.net
Jaikumar Vijayan
ComputerWorld
April 22, 2008

In a ruling that's likely to come as a disappointment for privacy-rights advocates, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit this week held that Customs officers need no reasonable suspicion to search through the contents of any individual's laptop computer at the country's borders.

The ruling reversed an earlier decision by the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, which had granted a motion seeking to suppress evidence gathered from such a search in a case involving child pornography. In arriving at that decision, the District Court ruled that Customs officers indeed did need to have reasonable or particularized suspicion for searching through laptop computers at U.S. borders.

The case involves a man named Michael Arnold, who was arrested in 2005 on charges of transporting child pornography on his laptop computer. According to a description of the case in court records, Arnold was returning home from a three-week vacation in the Philippines in July 2005, when he was pulled aside for secondary Customs screening at Los Angeles International Airport.

A Customs officer who was inspecting Arnold's luggage asked him to start his computer and had it examined by colleagues who found several images of what they believed were child pornography on the computer and in several storage devices that Arnold was carrying with him.

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Tipping Point in Autism-Vaccine Debate

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OpEdNews
April 22, 2008
By Anthony Wade

Little Hannah Poling was just 19 months old when she received five shots as part of the usual vaccination program. These shots would severely aggravate an underlying mitochondrial disorder which would result in a brain disorder; with features of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Prior to the vaccinations little Hannah was a normal toddler with appropriate verbal development. Within 48 hours of the vaccines her life would be irreparably and irretrievably changed. She developed a high fever, inconsolable crying and would choose to no longer walk. She no longer slept through the night and soon the signs of autism were obvious. Hannah started spinning behavior, staring at lights and stopped speaking for a time. This seemingly once normal child now requires one-on-one care at all times. Her parents realized that their child developed autism from the critical point when she received her vaccines.

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Exposed: The Great GM Crops Myth

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Common Dreams
April 20, 2008 by The Independent/UK
By Geoffrey Lean

Genetic modification actually cuts the productivity of crops, an authoritative new study shows, undermining repeated claims that a switch to the controversial technology is needed to solve the growing world food crisis.

The study - carried out over the past three years at the University of Kansas in the US grain belt - has found that GM soya produces about 10 per cent less food than its conventional equivalent, contradicting assertions by advocates of the technology that it increases yields.

Professor Barney Gordon, of the university’s department of agronomy, said he started the research - reported in the journal Better Crops - because many farmers who had changed over to the GM crop had “noticed that yields are not as high as expected even under optimal conditions”. He added: “People were asking the question ‘how come I don’t get as high a yield as I used to?’”

He grew a Monsanto GM soybean and an almost identical conventional variety in the same field. The modified crop produced only 70 bushels of grain per acre, compared with 77 bushels from the non-GM one.

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Sott.net
April 22, 2008
OpenPR
New York State Coalition Opposed to Fluoridation, Inc

Fluoride exposure is rising and causing children's tooth imperfections, ranging from white spots to brownish discolorations and pitting (fluorosis), dentist Elivir Dincer reports in the New York State Dental Journal. (1)

"Such changes in the tooth's appearance can affect the child's self-esteem which makes early prevention that much more critical," writes Dincer.

Children, aged 2 to 7 years, can swallow about one-quarter milligram of fluoride with every brushing because their swallowing reflexes are not fully developed, reports Dincer.

"Children from the age of 6-months to 3-years should not have more than one-quarter milligram of fluoride per day. Brushing the teeth of a 2-year-old twice a day will expose the child to about one-half milligram, exceeding the allowable [daily] limits" [from toothpaste alone], writes Dincer.

Intentionally swallowing the toothpaste which is likely, given the pleasant flavor of children's toothpaste, increases children's fluorosis risk, Dincer reports.

Fluoridated water, supplements, mouth rinses and/or foods add to daily fluoride intake.

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Handsets pose danger for children

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CNews.ru: Top Headlines
April 18, 2008

Handsets pose danger for children and teen-agers, state experts of the Russian National Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection having carried out experiments with animals of different age. The oncoming generation is recommended to reduce communication through handsets, as their nerves might be badly injured.

The Russian National Committee on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (RNCNIRP) has expressed its opinion regarding the possible influence of handset electromagnetic field on children and teen-ages. The experiments, consultations and discussions held led to the resolution ‘Children and handsets: future generations’ health is under threat’. The given resolution comprises opinions of leading Russian scientists in hygiene and radiobiology of Non-Ionizing Radiation. The given resolution is based on modern scientific knowledge and fundamental submission generated in many years of research into the influence of electromagnetic fields on human health.

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Rethinking AIDS Day

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April 23, 2008 is the first Rethinking AIDS Day. On this day and every day thereafter we ask that people all over the world begin questioning the HIV-AIDS paradigm – whether this diagnosis of a supposed death certificate disease, using faulty tests, for a virus that cannot be cultured, and then being prescribed expensive toxic drugs that destroy the immune system, makes any sense.

Here is a link to activities, new videos, and places – both virtual and real – where you can learn more about what you have not been told. We encourage you to become an AIDS Rethinker, and join us in commemorating Rethinking AIDS Day!

Commemorate Rethinking AIDS Day - Act Now!

After Earth Day - Rethinking AIDS on 23 April

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Associated Press
Eileen Sullivan
April 17, 2008

Washington - The government plans to begin collecting DNA samples from anyone arrested by a federal law enforcement agency - a move intended to prevent violent crime but which also is raising concerns about the privacy of innocent people.

Using authority granted by Congress, the government also plans to collect DNA samples from foreigners who are detained, whether they have been charged or not. The DNA would be collected through a cheek swab, Justice Department spokesman Erik Ablin said Wednesday. That would be a departure from current practice, which limits DNA collection to convicted felons.

Expanding the DNA database, known as CODIS, raises civil liberties questions about the potential for misuse of such personal information, such as family ties and genetic conditions.

Ablin said the DNA collection would be subject to the same privacy laws applied to current DNA sampling. That means none of it would be used for identifying genetic traits, diseases or disorders.

Congress gave the Justice Department the authority to expand DNA collection in two different laws passed in 2005 and 2006.

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NaturalNews.com
by Mike Adams
April 16, 2008

(NaturalNews) The latest attack on vitamins A, C, E, selenium and beta-carotene comes from the Cochrane Library, a widely-read source of information on conventional health matters. In the paper published yesterday, these antioxidants were linked with a higher risk of mortality ("they'll kill you!"), and now serious-sounding scientists have warned consumers away from taking vitamins altogether. But with all the benefits of antioxidants already well known to the well-informed, how did the Cochrane Library arrive at such a conclusion? It's easy: The researchers considered 452 studies on these vitamins, and they threw out the 405 studies where nobody died! That left just 47 studies where subjects died from various causes (one study was conducted on terminal heart patients, for example). From this hand-picked selection of studies, these researchers concluded that antioxidants increase mortality.

Just in case the magnitude of the scientific fraud taking place here has not yet become apparent, let me repeat what happened: These scientists claimed to be studying the effects of vitamins on mortality, right? They were conducting a meta-analysis based on reviewing established studies. But instead of conducting an honest review of all the studies, they arbitrarily decided to eliminate all studies in which vitamins prevented mortality and kept people alive! They did this by "excluding all studies in which no participants died." What was left to review? Only the studies in which people died from various causes.

Brilliant, huh? This sort of bass-ackward science would earn any teenager an "F" in high school science class. But apparently it's good enough for the Cochrane Library, not to mention all the mainstream press outlets that are now repeating these silly conclusions as scientific fact.

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washingtonpost.com
By Nita Farahany
April 13, 2008

Imagine a world of streets lined with video cameras that alert authorities to any suspicious activity. A world where police officers can read the minds of potential criminals and arrest them before they commit any crimes. A world in which a suspect who lies under questioning gets nabbed immediately because his brain has given him away.

Though that may sound a lot like the plot of the 2002 movie "Minority Report," starring Tom Cruise and based on a Philip K. Dick novel, I'm not talking about science fiction here; it turns out we're not so far away from that world. But does it sound like a very safe place, or a very scary one?

It's a question I think we should be asking as the federal government invests millions of dollars in emerging technology aimed at detecting and decoding brain activity. And though government funding focuses on military uses for these new gizmos, they can and do end up in the hands of civilian law enforcement and in commercial applications. As spending continues and neurotechnology advances, that imagined world is no longer the stuff of science fiction or futuristic movies, and we postpone at our peril confronting the ethical and legal dilemmas it poses for a society that values not just personal safety but civil liberty as well.

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To: Professor Kent Woods
Chief Executive
Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency -- MHRA

Copy: All European Medical Agencies (concerned member states
for Strattera)
Copy: Media

April 13, 2008

Reports indicate that 55 children and adolescents have died under Strattera treatment in 5 years -- 31 of them committed suicide.

In total there are reports of 102 instances of death -- 57 of them from suicide.

This is a request for an official investigation into ALL instances of death in connection with the ADHD drug Strattera.

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