DailyTech
Science
Tiffany Kaiser
October 5, 2010


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May slowly but surely switch from biotech seed to conventional seed

Seed farmers throughout the United States are complaining that biotech seeds (which are genetically altered seeds) are becoming much too expensive, resistant to weed killer, and can contaminate conventional seed crops. However, they still continue to use the seeds. But with anticompetitive practices being investigated on biotech seed companies, seed farmers may change their minds.

"The technology has really been hyped up a lot," said Doug Gurian-Sherman, author of a 2009 study for the Union of Concerned Scientists, which concluded that yield increases have come mainly from conventional plant breeding. "Even on a shoestring, conventional breeding outperforms genetic engineering.

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Xenophilia
Posted by Xeno on October 7, 2010

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Anger is growing in Europe about new Washington data sharing demands, in what they call a move to stop potential terrorists from entering the U.S. The requirements include fingerprints, DNA samples and cross border payments – data considered by many as private and sensitive. Travellers from countries refusing to share the information will have to apply for a visa to enter the U.S. However some EU states – like Austria and Germany – have already agreed to hand over the personal data of its citizens.

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Natural News
October 06, 2010
by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer

(NaturalNews) October is breast cancer awareness month, which means pink ribbons and literature about getting mammograms litter the landscape even more than they normally do during the rest of the year. But many women who have survived the disease are questioning the role environmental chemicals play in contributing to breast cancer, and wondering why groups like Susan G. Komen for the Cure and the American Cancer Society (ACS) -- groups that claim to be doing everything possible to find a cure -- have nothing to say about it.

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The Independent
By Jeremy Laurance, Health Editor
October 1, 2010

Female sexual dysfunction – which is claimed to affect up to two thirds of women – is a disorder invented by the pharmaceutical industry to build global markets for drugs to treat it, it is claimed today.

Drug companies have invested millions in the search for a female equivalent of Viagra, so far without success. But while doing so they have stoked demand by creating a buzz around the disorder they have created, according to Ray Moynihan, a lecturer at the University of Newcastle in Australia.

Corporate employees worked with medical opinion leaders, ran surveys aimed at portraying the problem as widespread and helped create the diagnostic instruments to persuade women that their sexual difficulties deserved a medical label. But sex problems in women are far more complex than they are in men, encompassing lack of desire, lack of arousal and lack of orgasm and the drug industry's narrow focus is failing them.

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CommonDreams.org
October 4, 2010
by This Can't Be Happening
by Dave Lindorff

If you have been feeling uneasy about having to be X-rayed by a Transportation Security Administration goon who can look under your clothes every time you fly, consider this: at least you can say no, and agree to be subjected to an old-fashioned full-body search.

No opt-out for the latest in anti-terror technology though, with reports just out in Forbes Magazine and the Christian Science Monitor that the Homeland Security Department has purchased 500 mobile X-ray vans called ZBVs that can scan cars, trucks and homes without the drivers even knowing that they're being zapped.

These vans, made by a Massachusetts company called American Science & Engineering, are fitted out with what are called Z Backscatter X-ray devices, which aim a focused X-ray beam that reportedly has the capability of penetrating 14 inches of steel.

In theory, the device is supposed to be safe for human targets, because it is operated at a distance, and because the beam is weakened by penetrating the metal of a vehicle before it reaches a person. But the flaws in this kind of reassuring safety calculus are readily apparent in a photo of a small truck carrying contraband that accompanies the Christian Science Monitor story. The X-ray image, after penetrating the truck cab's metal body, clearly shows the contraband behind the driver's seat, but it also just as clearly shows the shadowy outline of the driver of the pickup. Worse yet, even his window is half-way down, so there is no shielding at all of the X-rays hitting his head.

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The One Click Group
Dr Meryl Nass, MD
October 1, 2010

NIH's Experts Estimate 59% of the US population is already immune to swine flu

Tony Fauci (head of NIH's NIAID), along with David Morens and Jeffrey Taubenberger, both renowned flu experts, have run the numbers and concluded that a majority of Americans are already immune to swine flu, either from last year's vaccination (62 million) or a prior exposure. Most of those exposed never got sick.

In a paper titled, "The 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Virus: What Next?" they note that 19% of Americans (60 million people) had immunity even before the swine flu outbreak was identified in Mexico in March 2009, based on seroprevalence data. They estimate another 20% of Americans (61 million people) were naturally infected since March 2009 with the swine flu virus.

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Coca-cola to phase out controversial Sodium Benzoate

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Coca-cola to phase out controversial chemical linked to hyperactivity and gene damage

By Colin Fernandez

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Phase out: Coca cola is withdrawing the chemical sodium benzoate, which is used to stop fizzy drinks going mouldySoft drink giant Coca-Cola is phasing out a controversial additive that has been linked to hyperactivity and causing damage to DNA.The chemical Sodium Benzoate, also known as E211, is used to stop fizzy drinks going mouldy. But recent research has shown that the chemical can deactivate parts of DNA, the genetic code in the cells of living creatures.

Coca-Cola said it was withdrawing the additive from Diet Coke in response to consumer demand for more natural products.
The move will mean that by the end of the year  no can will contain E211 - and it plans to remove it from its other products as soon as possible.
But the company said at present it had not found a satisfactory alternative to replace the additive in some soft drinks with a higher juice content including Fanta and Dr Pepper.
Other fizzy drinks made by rival companies, such as Irn-Bru, Pepsi Max and Lucozade will continue to contain the additive.


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Mercola.com  
By Jeffrey Smith
October 4, 2010

Arpad Pusztai

Biologist Arpad Pusztai had more than 300 articles and 12 books to his credit and was the world’s top expert in his field.

But when he accidentally discovered that genetically modified (GM) foods are dangerous, he became the biotech industry’s bad-boy poster child, setting an example for other scientists thinking about blowing the whistle.

In the early 1990s, Dr. Pusztai was awarded a $3 million grant by the UK government to design the system for safety testing genetically modified organisms (GMOs). His team included more than 20 scientists working at three facilities, including the Rowett Institute in Aberdeen, Scotland, the top nutritional research lab in the UK, and his employer for the previous 35 years.

The results of Pusztai’s work were supposed to become the required testing protocols for all of Europe. But when he fed supposedly harmless GM potatoes to rats, things didn’t go as planned.

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Autism and retroviruses...

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Autism has recently been associated with a virus, which brings to mind the somewhat frightening possibility that there are some researchers already working on a vaccine to prevent ... autism.

Cal Crilly isn't agreeing that XMRV is a causative agent for autism, any more than HIV has been shown to cause Aids. But then what is autism caused by. Cal has written up some more of his research ... as usual dense with relevant links. Let's follow him down the rabbit hole ...

Autism and retroviruses...

Well I wrote The Castle Wall Theory of Disease as it happened in my head knowing my net access was going to go at work and the computer at home died within the month.... And I've been too broke to afford a net cafe until now.

In the meantime I did the usual Cal Crilly search this week to see if I was getting abused by people like Todd Deshong and found that on the Age of Autism site someone read the Castle Wall Theory and made some sense of it.
The Whittemore-Peterson Institute - A Light in the Darkness (XMRV Update!!!)

So I will talk about XMRV and why it is like HIV and AIDS as in "NOT THE CAUSE" .....and is only a small part of the picture in Autism.

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For OpEdNews: Kevin Zeese - Writer

September 29, 2010

Trend of Activist Searches Began Under Bush, Continues Under Obama

Series of Inspector General Reports Shows FBI Violating Constitutional Rights of American Peace Activists While Raids Occur in Illinois and Minneapolis

Earlier this week the FBI raided six homes of eight peace activists in Minneapolis and Chicago as well as a Minneapolis office of an antiwar group. Agents kicked down doors of homes with guns drawn, smashed furniture, and seized computers, documents, phones, and other materials without making any arrests. These groups do not use guns and bombs. They are not terrorists. Their "weapons" are leaflets, newsletters, and nonviolent demonstrations.

The FBI searches highlight a dangerous trend that has been building for nearly a decade: domestic surveillance of peace and other activists. Americans need to understand the context of these raids so they can work to stop the infringement of constitutional rights.

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